CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-09-2004, 07:45 PM   #1
Tim Morrison
Member Tim Morrison is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: chicago  il
Posts: 149
The tough thing is that the workouts/exercises are programmed so infrequently/randomly(which I know can be a good thing that after failing to successfully do the majority of the workouts/exercises you really want the chance to work towards DOING that damn workout/exercise again!... but you know you won't...and thats frustrating... not having the usual path of progressions towards eventually achieving a specific training challenge.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2004, 08:48 PM   #2
Michael Pearce
Member Michael Pearce is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Noda-shi  Chiba-ken
Posts: 320
Some WODs don't come back as you said but so far all the exercises used in any of the WODs do come back. Sometimes to haunt me. So what I do is keep a record of what I can do in each exercise, and only on the WODs that do turn up again do I keep records.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2004, 10:03 PM   #3
Carrie Klumpar
Member Carrie Klumpar is offline
 
Carrie Klumpar's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Seattle/Redmond  WA
Posts: 461
In a way, that's just part of the nature of the whole wonderful variety thing that is CF. And, I dunno, maybe it's useful as a sort of being-in-the-present exercise too. That is, you just do the work as intensely as you can on a given day, focusing fully on it and its merits, rather than always thinking about what it gets you toward, if you see what I mean.

Of course, we all are progress-minded, and some goals and challenges are built in, such as the CrossFit Challenges listed on the Trophy Case page, any of the named benchmark workouts (the "girls") or other recurring WODs, the 40-pullup challenge that recently took place, or your own PRs and maxes on specific lifts or exercises. And while some of these things you may in fact work specifically and train for in a focused way, they’re also useful, imo, as benchmarks of your overall fitness as much as your ability on that particular thing. For example, tracking progress over time on the 5K runs that show up periodically in the WOD, even though CF isn’t a running program; or using the benchmark workouts to judge the general gains you’ve made from doing the whole variety of CF workouts, without training specifically for those “events.” It might be a bit of a paradigm shift, in that it’s more various and less single-minded than “the usual path of progressions,” but it’s not all that different, I don’t think. Every workout is a step on the path; the path just may lead to something bigger than that one specific challenge.

That said, of course I do think it’s interesting to track and perhaps set goals for various specific things, like (to mention some of the ones that I find interesting): length of time you can hold a handstand or L-sit; KB snatch & C&J numbers; rowing times; max lifts; number of a certain exercise in a single set; getting that first muscle-up or press to handstand; improving in your sport of choice; or whatever. I wish I had tracked this sort of thing better all along.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 08:47 AM   #4
David Werner
Affiliate David Werner is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Seattle  WA
Posts: 399
Carrie

You really get it. Your point about focusing fully on the challenge at hand is perfect.

Tim

You are making progress toward specific goals - just in a non-linear way. Which counterintuitively, will get you there faster! And get you to more places at once!

Dave Werner
Crossfit North
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 09:46 AM   #5
Matt Gagliardi
Member Matt Gagliardi is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Memphis  TN
Posts: 946
Dave...how many dimensions is that ;)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 09:58 AM   #6
Tim Morrison
Member Tim Morrison is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: chicago  il
Posts: 149
Thanks.
It'l take a little time.
Each workout I've done I've come away feeling I'm incredibly inadequate in the cardio/respiratory dept then am thinking in terms of regretting the fact I can't master THAT workout again...... because when I fail at something I damn well want to conquer it as soon as I can..... whereas 'failing' at a workout in say my old 20rep squat routine goal was 'ok' cause I knew it was a necessary step toward eventually mastering that 300 pd 20 rep squat challenge.
I'm a longtime coach and thrive on clearly defined measurable outcomes bit I think I need to think more of acquiring the designated Crossfit athletic capacities in general and not certain workouts per se.
Setting up benchmarks is something Crossfit should highlight more I think (at the risk of instilling routine,I know!).
Thanks again for the input.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 10:00 AM   #7
Mike Yukish
Member Mike Yukish is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: State College  PA
Posts: 448
This discussion on metrics reminds me of a passage from Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.
http://www.virtualschool.edu/mon/Quality/PirsigZen/

All quarter long papers would go back to the students with comments but no grades, although the grades were entered in a book.

...Many of the students with A records in previous quarters were contemptuous and angry at first, but because of their acquired self-discipline went ahead and did the work anyway. The B students and high-C students missed some of the early assignments or turned in sloppy work. Many of the low-C and D students didn't even show up for class. At this time another teacher asked him what he was going to do about this lack of response.

"Outwait them," he said.

...The A students began to get nervous and started to turn in superb work...The B and high-C students began to...bring up the quality of their papers...The low C, D and future F's began to show up for class just to see what was going on.

...Phædrus was getting a kind of class participation that made other teachers take notice...Only the D's and F's sat frozen in their chairs, in a complete internal panic.

"Everyone decided the best way was just to figure you were going to fail and then go ahead and do what you could anyway."

...Fifty-four percent opposed it. Thirty-seven percent favored it. Nine percent were neutral...when Phædrus broke down the returns according to the grades...The A students were 2 to 1 in favor of the system. The B and C students were evenly divided. And the D's and F's were unanimously opposed!

...supported a hunch he had had for a long time: that the brighter, more serious students were the least desirous of grades...whereas the dull or lazy students were the most desirous of grades, possibly because grades told them if they were getting by.


  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 10:26 AM   #8
Matt Gagliardi
Member Matt Gagliardi is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Memphis  TN
Posts: 946
Tim...keep in mind that there are several recognized "benchmark" workouts. There's no reason you can't pick 1 out on a regular basis and do it to see where you stand.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 10:51 AM   #9
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
This is a tough thing! There simply is no "A+" here and that can be a little ego bruising at first.

I had a client two years ago who was very over weight and just getting into fitness. The WOD was Diane-21,15,9 dead lift and hand stand push ups. I had her do ~65lbs on the DL and just kicked up to a hand stand for time. Most of the session she complained about how inadequate her effort was compared to the prescribed WOD. I pointed out to her that it is dead easy to create a WO no one can do. For example when one can straight set Diane as prescribed it takes around 3:30, what if we make those HSPU's on paralettes? How about on the rings? Get my drift? This program is about stimulus,adaptation and growth. This is NOT getting 1600 on the SAT's!!!

As folks have pointed out, the benchmark WO's are there...as bench marks. Relax into the process and enjoy both the challenges and the rewards.

BTW-This client never could come to terms with where she was starting from and slowly drifted away from training. Each situation I encounter like this I take a a personal failure on my part but alas, there is only so much Coaching one can do. It is ultimately up to the individual to wrap and package reality in a digestible way.
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2004, 12:04 PM   #10
Scott Kustes
Member Scott Kustes is offline
 
Scott Kustes's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisville  KY
Posts: 1,258
Tim, when I started doing CrossFit, I worried about the lack of routine as well. I couldn't do the exercises that were staples very well (Barry Cooper can vouch for my first few attempts at the Clean...not pretty) and what I thought was a decent aerobic base turned out to be insufficient for the anaerobic work of a WOD. I struggled with 115 and 135 was beyond me on the clean (just 8 months later, I can workout with those and clean 215 as a single). I don't recall where I read it, but I read an article recently talking about how the body neurologically adapts with repeated efforts and eventually it just "happens", it "clicks", your body "knows" how to do it. It happened to me aerobically, anaerobically, and strength-wise (with some coaching from Barry and repeated attempts)...my time's dropped drastically after a couple of months and the weights I use have gone way up.

As everyone has said, you can pick your own benchmarks. There are heavy singles WODs in the bench, squat, OH squat, deadlift, etc that I use to benchmark my limit strength. In the past 4 months, my deadlift max has gone from 315 with a struggle to 395 with less of a struggle. There are the "girls" which I also use. I use max pullups to see how that's going. I use recovery time (somewhat subjective, but nonetheless...it's your subjectivity) to see how well my anaerobic abilities have improved. CrossFit has all of the elements of a traditional weight program and then some. You aren't going for your max squat or 20 reps weekly. But every couple months, benchmarks come back around and you just may blow right through your previous limits. Everytime I feel like I've hit my peak, CrossFit takes my peak a step further.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Paradigm Shift - it's your guts, stupid! Ragnar Speicher Nutrition 26 05-16-2010 07:44 PM
Getting old is tough Eugene R. Allen Community 11 10-26-2005 05:33 PM
Tough New Zealander Donald Woodson Community 1 04-21-2005 12:42 PM
Tough guy mark litherland Competitions 2 01-25-2005 02:37 PM
Midnight Shift & Crossfit James R. Climer Fitness 7 12-12-2004 11:08 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.