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Old 04-26-2010, 05:51 PM   #1
Danim Suer
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Adapting boxing to muay thai and MMA?

I'm currently trying to do this for myself, mixing boxing experience into muay thai and MMA training. Getting leg kicked is a whole new feeling and boxing with a low stance to avoid take downs is a different story. I welcome all opinions and experiences to contribute.
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Old 04-27-2010, 10:44 AM   #2
Tony Black
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Re: Adapting boxing to muay thai and MMA?

What sort of boxing experience do you have m8?


You also dont have a ref to stop a clinch from going on longer then a few seconds..... And the glove sizes dont really facilitate a guard up defense like in boxing...

Those seem to be the main critical MMA sport fighting points of difference.


However not all opponents are kickers or even inclined to kick! Also not all opponents are inclined to shoot for a takedown or clinch. Predictable opponents make your job easier!


Reading and reacting to the opponent intentions is a big part of the game - and drilling good instant responses to a shoot, leg kick whatever. This factor alone makes a single fighting style fighter very vunerable at the start. Youll get pwned alot by guys who're doing something youve left yourself open too...

You will become better at this with experience and decent coaching. But it always suks at the start


Your own posture should lend itself to being able to kick and do takedowns/clinches too! If the only threat you present to a opponent is boxing based skills it makes it alot more predictable and easier to counter. Low leg kicks/ shoots/clinchs and throws should be in your arsenal too! A well round fighter is a better one!


Anyhow beyond all that....


So if you wanting to make your hand skills and boxing background count you looking to cross the kicking range and stay in that intermidate "hand range" all the while avoiding being clinched or taken down. This is all much easier with a stunned or dazed opponent!

So in essence you need to learn how to be able to generate effective striking power from that "adapted" MMA stance you were talking about....and either draw or close until your in range.

Once i was in my "ideal range" i would personnelly avoid bilateral striking (left, right, left, right) and focus on much more on indexing or fixing the opposition with my lead (say a left) and belting him with lots of rights. This has the advantage of being more accurate!

Its the equivalent of being infront of a speed ball and trying to accurately land lefts then rights. Or grabbing hold with one hand and then laying in lots of rights! Except the moving bag is a human! Which is going to give a better hit rate?

Remember your not there to do pretty boxing - your there for a result - in this case neutralising the opposition!

Theres a excellent clip illustrating what im saying ill dig it up later.
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Old 04-29-2010, 10:55 PM   #3
Matt Spooner
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Re: Adapting boxing to muay thai and MMA?

You need to keep your front (& back heel) up the whole time (so you can check/block the kicks) and maintain your balance-This allows you to raise your front leg off the ground (block kick) & also enables you to pivot your front foot when you punch/kick for more power due to whole body rotation-you also must be able to sprawl to counter takedown-not sure of your experience but a good drill is to shadow box while a partner either randomly leg kicks you (check/block kick) or attempts double leg (sprawl). Key is not to much weight on your front leg-have fun!
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Old 04-30-2010, 05:31 PM   #4
Matt Payne
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Re: Adapting boxing to muay thai and MMA?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Spooner View Post
You need to keep your front (& back heel) up the whole time (so you can check/block the kicks) and maintain your balance-This allows you to raise your front leg off the ground (block kick) & also enables you to pivot your front foot when you punch/kick for more power due to whole body rotation-you also must be able to sprawl to counter takedown-not sure of your experience but a good drill is to shadow box while a partner either randomly leg kicks you (check/block kick) or attempts double leg (sprawl). Key is not to much weight on your front leg-have fun!
Why would you keep your front and back heel up off the ground? That does not make sense to me. Rear heal yes not lead foot. You can check a kick without the heel raised.
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Old 05-04-2010, 02:18 AM   #5
Matt Spooner
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Re: Adapting boxing to muay thai and MMA?

There are many reasons-to list a few-The front heel up allows you to be fast and agile (like a sprinter)when you step- your ball of foot lands first(quicker,again like sprinting) instead of heel striking first (slower)-weight should be 50/50 over both feet-also allows easier to front foot pivot when throwing hooks/body rips of lead hand (whole body rotates)-also allows being able to step when you slip or weave (angles) instead of just moving your head (still in front of opponent)-and it is easier to block both outside & inside kicks then having weight on front foot.Stops you from leading with your head-& allows you to go backwards for evasion or walking an opponent onto strikes.
To name a few of many reasons.Quality striking is about knowing your range & good footwork to create angles & get a advantage over your opponent.
Some people prefer to just stand in front, toe 2 toe & bang-good for the spectators & fine if you want brain damage. Footwork & angles are the key to becoming a great striker & longevity in the sport.
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Old 05-13-2010, 03:22 AM   #6
Danim Suer
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Re: Adapting boxing to muay thai and MMA?

Thanks for the tips guys. My boxing isn't top notch (only been at it for a year) but it's something I'd really like to work in. I'll give the advice a try.
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