CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-01-2011, 10:20 PM   #1
Chris Mason
Banned Chris Mason is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Charlottesville  VA
Posts: 4,708
Weight gain threads

I just wanted to say something on the subject. If you are an individual who has trouble gaining weight and you are CrossFitting 3-5 times per week and then running on alternate days etc., IT AIN'T GOING TO HAPPEN.

You need to train for your goal. If you want to gain body weight then the focus of your training should be on hypertrophy based training.

If you want to get stronger then the focus of your training should be on proper strength training.

You can always FOCUS on something and do a couple of WODs per week to maintain conditioning while you address your need.

Once you obtain your goal, you can then go back to focusing on your CrossFit conditioning and maintain the weight and or strength gains.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 08:47 AM   #2
Mike Johnson
Member Mike Johnson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Phoenix  AZ
Posts: 439
Re: Weight gain threads

Hey Chris do you think weight gain is a requirement for strength building? If it is possible to lose weight and gain strength do you have any ideas how to make it work?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 08:57 AM   #3
Evan Peikon
Banned Evan Peikon is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: East Northport  NY
Posts: 650
Re: Weight gain threads

just my 2c but i don't think its a requirement. I've upped all my strength numbers a lot and have stayed the same weight. increases in strength can be caused by a few factors.
INB4- there was a thread on this awhile back
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 09:29 AM   #4
Katherine Derbyshire
Member Katherine Derbyshire is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Seattle  WA
Posts: 7,596
Re: Weight gain threads

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Johnson View Post
Hey Chris do you think weight gain is a requirement for strength building? If it is possible to lose weight and gain strength do you have any ideas how to make it work?
Weight class athletes are able to get stronger at a stable weight, so it's certainly possible. A lot of strength gain actually comes from improved muscular recruitment, not increased muscle mass.

There are a couple of problems, though. The first and most important is the calorie deficit: to lose weight, you need a calorie deficit, but to recover from heavy lifting you need lots of food.

The second problem is mixed up priorities. A lot of people who post with those goals turn out to be skinny teenagers with essentially no lifting experience. They want muscle definition, but don't actually have much muscle. Those people -- and I'm not saying that's you, just that it's a common phenomenon -- need to gain a lot of weight and get a lot stronger before worrying about teh abz.

Katherine
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 09:44 AM   #5
Mike Johnson
Member Mike Johnson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Phoenix  AZ
Posts: 439
Re: Weight gain threads

Thanks for the feedback, and I have made good gains at a relatively stable weight. Let me clarify my question a little. I am looking at losing 5%-10%, most of that would hopefully be made with a change in body composition. My goal would be to find that comfortable medium of being able to run well and lift heavy. However do I have to be resigned to much slower gains (weight/speed/distance) and body weight losses? Is there a way to expedite one side of the equation while settling for slower progress on the other?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 09:56 AM   #6
Sheldon Kreger
Member Sheldon Kreger is offline
 
Sheldon Kreger's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pocatello  ID
Posts: 155
Re: Weight gain threads

I've seen you explain this *so many* times here. I actually took your advice a few months ago and switched to Crossfit Football. None of the metcons are longer than 20 minutes. Strength work is a lot of fun, my numbers are going up, and I'm *slowly* gaining weight (maybe 2 lbs per month).

Had I kept hitting long metcons, I don't think I would have realized how much I love focused strength work. My overall fitness was suffering because I was always too exhausted to work on lifting heavier.

I would be gaining faster if I wasn't on my bike so much (about 40 minutes per day). If I owned a car, I would probably cut most of that out as well. But, I love riding my bike and I am happy with my progress overall.

I am actually going to be training with an Olympic weightlifting coach starting next month. I'm really excited to see what we can do!

-sheldon

Last edited by Sheldon Kreger : 10-03-2011 at 10:03 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 10:17 AM   #7
Scott Tredennick
Member Scott Tredennick is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Orlando  FL
Posts: 118
Re: Weight gain threads

My two cents on gaining strength and losing weight is that it will work for a while with a novice lifter but for someone who is more advanced it might take a bit of nutrition programming with higher carb and kcal on training days with less on rest days. Don't think a program like that would work very well with metcons spread out throughout the week and strength training. "A calorie deficit is a recovery deficit. Avoid deficit spending." -Martin Berkham
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 10:32 AM   #8
Matt Haxmeier
Member Matt Haxmeier is offline
 
Matt Haxmeier's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Arvada  CO
Posts: 1,619
Re: Weight gain threads

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
There are a couple of problems, though. The first and most important is the calorie deficit: to lose weight, you need a calorie deficit, but to recover from heavy lifting you need lots of food.
This is my problem. I can see strength gains if I eat a ton. But getting heavier makes most crossfit workouts just suck. Crossfit is definitely a little guys sport. Nobody over 200lbs would be like "hey, let's do 150 pullups" or whatever ridiculous number of bodyweight exercises.

So then I start getting too heavy or near my goal weight and cut back on calories and then start feeling like utter crap, getting way more sore, and stalling.

I debate with myself on taking some time to cut a little weight and then having another run of heavy lifting and heavy eating.

I don't really believe that people can't gain weight. My wife just tried to put on a little size and couldn't do it. It's not that she's a "hard gainer", although she might disagree. In my opinion, she is just some combination of
a.) not committed enough to the process to put up with how crappy you feel when you overeat
b.) too busy to take the proper time required to overeat and burning too many calories chasing our kids around
c.) not willing to eat the kinds of foods that put on a ton of weight quickly.
d.) not willing to chill out any more than she already is on the metcons

Last edited by Matt Haxmeier : 10-03-2011 at 10:40 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2011, 05:15 PM   #9
Chris Mason
Banned Chris Mason is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Charlottesville  VA
Posts: 4,708
Re: Weight gain threads

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Johnson View Post
Hey Chris do you think weight gain is a requirement for strength building? If it is possible to lose weight and gain strength do you have any ideas how to make it work?
That is such a loaded question with such a complex answer...

Ok, let me try to keep it simple.

First, the individual's relative level of development plays hugely into the answer. If you have been training properly for a while and really acclimated your nervous system to strength training then adding lean muscle in order to increase strength becomes more important.

Demonstrable strength is a combination of your nervous system and contractile myofibrils (force producing components of the muscle cells).

So, if you have not improved and or optimized your nervous system to a given movement then you can get stronger without adding any lean muscle mass. The less improved the more room for progress.

Adding strength while losing body weight is possible in those who are quite undeveloped, but the stronger you are relative to your baseline the more difficult it gets (not counting body weight movements as they can obviously get easier even if your force production capacity drops as the load may drop faster).

If you have more or less tapped out neural improvements then you have to increase the force production capacity of the muscle cells by increasing the size of the contractile myofibrils. This is why highly experienced weightlifters will often move up in class. They have more or less tapped themselves out at a given body weight.

So, to answer your question, if you are relatively untapped, and I would guess you are, train specifically for strength while in a caloric deficit and you will be able to increase your strength while losing body fat.

You probably know I feel Westside is the best way to train for absolute strength.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Some threads moved, some threads deleted. Why? Laurion Burchall Technical Support 2 02-23-2010 02:10 PM
trying to gain weight Jacob Magnan Nutrition 16 02-12-2009 11:26 AM
Weight Gain? Joshua Williams Starting 5 11-27-2007 08:37 PM
Weight gain Dale S. Jansen Testimonials 1 06-07-2004 03:29 AM
Weight Gain Roy Fitness 10 09-15-2003 10:21 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.