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Old 10-03-2011, 05:18 AM   #11
Graeme Moore
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Re: Legumes

Thanks everyone, some great insight and links there.

So, it's really a case of moderation then (as always!). I agree with Thom and Michael, they're such an economical food I'd be loathe to cut them out.

With regards fermenting/soaking the beans, am I right in assuming that if I buy beans in a can, they're already fermented or soaked?!

I'm still confused about the soy argument, as far as I'm aware the Chinese are the biggest consumers of soy products yet live healthily til they're about 4million years old.....

As the main driver with regards my current diet is economy, I'll continue to include legumes.
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Old 10-03-2011, 06:20 AM   #12
Darryl Shaw
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Re: Legumes

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Originally Posted by Graeme Moore View Post
Sorry, I've looked around but I can't quite find the info I'm looking for. If there's an existing relevant thread, please just let me know.

Basically, 'Why should I not be eating legumes?'. I understand the case for grains but not sure what the issue is here...is it digestibility?

Thanks in advance.
The only reason I can think of for avoiding legumes would be a genuine allergy or a G6PD deficiency that would predispose you to favism. If neither of those applies to you you would almost certainly benefit from making legumes a regular part of your diet.

Legumes: the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people of different ethnicities.

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Originally Posted by Graeme Moore View Post
With regards fermenting/soaking the beans, am I right in assuming that if I buy beans in a can, they're already fermented or soaked?!
Canned beans can be eaten straight from the can without any further preperation beyond giving them a quick rinse to get the salt off them.

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I'm still confused about the soy argument, as far as I'm aware the Chinese are the biggest consumers of soy products yet live healthily til they're about 4million years old.....
Soy beans and traditional soy foods are perfectly safe to eat.

Hormonal Effects of Soy in Premenopausal Women and Men.

Soybean isoflavone exposure does not have feminizing effects on men: a critical examination of the clinical evidence.

Soy protein isolates of varying isoflavone content do not adversely affect semen quality in healthy young men.

Veganhealth.org - Soy: What's the Harm?

*All links wfs*
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Old 10-04-2011, 09:50 AM   #13
Rob Samuels
 
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Re: Legumes

I agree. The only reason to avoid beans is if you have some personal negative reaction to them. The same with any food item. Avoiding things because some self proclaimed expert did a study once where he made some ridiculous correlation is not what you should base your diet on.
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Old 10-09-2011, 08:03 PM   #14
Luke Seubert
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Re: Legumes

Soaking Legumes - Master Recipe
For those who wish to reduce the flatulent effects of legumes, the following recipe will help considerably. This multiple-soak process does slightly reduce the nutrients in legumes, but also significantly reduces flatulence for most people.
  • Measure volume of legumes to be prepared.
  • Thoroughly rinse legumes in colander under cold tap water. Pick out any malformed legumes, stones, or debris. Transfer legumes to large stainless steel pot.
  • Fill the pot with tepid water. Water quantity equals 10 times the volume of the legumes. (For example, 2 cups of legumes would require 20 cups, or 5 quarts, of tepid water.)
  • Soak the legumes for 1/3 the total required soaking time, and then drain and refill the pot with the same amount of tepid water as before.
  • Soak legumes for 2/3 the total required soaking time, and then drain and prepare as required by recipe.
Cooked Lentils - Master Recipe
For those who wish to eat legumes while minimizing consumption of lectins, lentils are a good choice. The following recipe, adapted from Julia Child, provides a master recipe for most lentil dishes.
  • Rinse, soak, drain, soak, and drain the lentils according to Soaking Legumes - Master Recipe.
  • Place soaked lentils, water, and salt into cooking pot.
  • Bring water just to a low boil for a few seconds. As the temperature rises, use the large spoon to skim off the white-gray scum that appears on the surface of the water. Discard scum in the small bowl.
  • Once momentarily brought to a low boil, reduce temperature, bringing water to a shiver. Continue skimming scum and discarding.
  • Shiver for approximately 5 to 20 minutes, depending on lentil type. Taste lentils from time to time, checking for the correct amount of doneness. Lentils are best when soft through to the center, but not mushy; retaining their shape with good texture.
  • Serve lentils immediately or place immediately in refrigerator in covered container in their own cooking liquid.

The question of what, exactly, constitutes a "shiver" is left as a research exercise for the student who apparently quite literally does not know how to boil water.
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:05 PM   #15
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Legumes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Seubert View Post
Soaking Legumes - Master Recipe
For those who wish to reduce the flatulent effects of legumes, the following recipe will help considerably. This multiple-soak process does slightly reduce the nutrients in legumes, but also significantly reduces flatulence for most people.
  • Measure volume of legumes to be prepared.
  • Thoroughly rinse legumes in colander under cold tap water. Pick out any malformed legumes, stones, or debris. Transfer legumes to large stainless steel pot.
  • Fill the pot with tepid water. Water quantity equals 10 times the volume of the legumes. (For example, 2 cups of legumes would require 20 cups, or 5 quarts, of tepid water.)
  • Soak the legumes for 1/3 the total required soaking time, and then drain and refill the pot with the same amount of tepid water as before.
  • Soak legumes for 2/3 the total required soaking time, and then drain and prepare as required by recipe.
Alternatively, for those who aren't organized enough to allow extensive soaking time, cover the legumes with cold water and bring to a boil. Drain, cover with more cold water and again bring to a boil. Drain again, and then proceed as specified in the recipe.

Katherine
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