CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-16-2004, 06:35 AM   #1
Ryan Atkins
Member Ryan Atkins is offline
 
Ryan Atkins's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Racine  WI
Posts: 925
Yesterday, I asked my 5yo daughter Julia if she wanted to do a WOD. Her reply was a lot more enthusiastic than I anticipated, so was her continuing effort throughout the three rounds of a modified version of Helen that I ran her through. Before going to bed last night, she asked if she could do another WOD the next day. I have the February 2003 issue of the CFJ (which addresses issues of using the WOD for elderly and children), so I know it's important to scale the loads/distances back, insist on perfect form and celebrate small gains. Also, I never plan on having her do a structured WOD unless she requests it. In spite of this, I want to make sure that I'm not missing anything important. If anybody has any useful advice for fitness involving young children, my ears are open. Thanks in advance.

Ryan
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2004, 09:36 AM   #2
Michael Rutherford
Affiliate Michael Rutherford is offline
 
Michael Rutherford's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Leawood  Kansas
Posts: 200
Keep it FUN with bodyweight only resistance. Emphasize proper movements, running mechanics, climbing, jumping and throwing stuff. Make the movements a game.

I am basically opposed to too much structure until around twelve. There will be plenty of structure as she advances through her athletic career.

If you call anything the WOD she will buy it. Frank Forencich has some neat concepts at http://www.goanimal.com.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2004, 12:17 PM   #3
Larry Cook
Member Larry Cook is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Cheshire  CT
Posts: 274
Ryan,
Sounds like you have her off to a good start ... my first thought is that you'll know what is right and what is not just by being involved and monitoring her interest and attitude.

I would second Rut's comment on FUN/GAMES ... my kids (10 now - twins) are very active and, I think like most kids, competitive. So, while not everyone can win THE game, there is generally an aspect to any game that they can enjoy (i.e. "win" - celebrate small gains).

Our favorite thing lately (now that the weather is improving) is to set up an obstacle course with things to climb over/under/through ... stations for push-ups or jumping jacks ... cones to kick a soccer ball through ... things like that. We change it around all the time.

I have not yet considered doing anything with weights ... but maybe very light DB swings as a station would work.

One thing to caution against is that when they say they've had enough ... they generally have. That "one more rep" mentality is not really appropriate for kids. I notice that my kids' intensity level during activity is very high ... relatively speaking, I think they push themselves harder than I push myself.

Anyway, judging from your posts in general, I'm sure you'll manage her activities superbly. Enjoy!
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2004, 06:50 PM   #4
Dale S. Jansen
Member Dale S. Jansen is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: tucson  arizona
Posts: 279
be prepared at some point for a loss of interest in p.t. My eldest(20) was in the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps from 13-16. During this time she was a p.t. animal outrunning and outperforming almost everyone in her bootcamp. she set the female record for pushups in the gas chamber(without mask)at 57 which nailed almost all the males in her unit. she yelled and screamed and motivated the doughies. then, a 3 yr hiatus. Mind you, the Sea Cadets was her idea. Now, she is running and doing SEAL routines again(she left Cadets when she learned the military would not let her be a SEAL). She is a tough little animal but no amount of encouragement, cajoling etc would get her going again til she was ready. your daughter may not do this, but just be aware it is a possibility. dale
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2004, 07:17 AM   #5
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
My 8 year old son is very involved in sports. He developed his intrest independent of me. I was into more individual sports when I was young, for me in high school: cross country running, swimming and gymnastics, also martial arts. My little guy loves the major sports. He played contact football last year, baseball (3 years), basketball (3 years), soccer (5 years). I took him to a father and son 6 week hitting clinic, he's doing a non-contact football camp this summer, and he plays basketball in the driveway every day. I want him to have fun with sports and develop the basic skills (CORRECTLY) until he's about 10-11, in Middle School I think I'm going to introduce him to the basic lifts and structure of Crossfit. Highschool, I hope he will join me 6 days a week in the WOD. . .we'll see. I would love to hear Dan John's comments on training kids.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2004, 05:40 AM   #6
Michael Rutherford
Affiliate Michael Rutherford is offline
 
Michael Rutherford's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Leawood  Kansas
Posts: 200
Larry-Just make sure it's HIS idea to go and train. I will assume that the six day WOD will be really light and play orientated.

I have spent a considerable amount of time coaching youth sports and working with kids and their overly zealous parents. Everyone is convinced that their son/daughter is going to be the next Heisman trophy winner. Several of these little league all-stars are burned out by high school and sit at home after school smoking weed.

It’s natural to want the best and see the best in your child. You walk a fine line being their parent and coach. If you step across the line then you will alter the dynamics of your parenting role.

I often speak of creating a support environment for young athletes. Opportunities should be made available without too much insistence. I am also convinced that modeling by parents is a much better approach than shoveling it down their throats.

At the end of the deal you hoped to have a well rounded young adult who embraces a healthy lifestyle that includes physical training.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2004, 06:45 AM   #7
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
Michael, I hear you loud and clear, great advise. I see this pushing often with parents. I think kids specialize way to early these days. I think from 1-12 the primary focus for kids should be FUN and exposure to play and a lot of various sports to develop motor skills. Thanks again for the reply.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2004, 10:55 AM   #8
Ryan Atkins
Member Ryan Atkins is offline
 
Ryan Atkins's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Racine  WI
Posts: 925
Thanks for all the advice, gentlemen. I didn't get the chance to have her do a WOD yesterday (unless you count our trip to the park).

Today she programmed her own WOD while I was warming up for mine. She did some front squats (with a 5# +/- training bar I made for her), some cartwheels, punched the bag a little, did some one-legged lateral jumps back and forth over an unloaded bar, used a 5# dumbbell for some swings and did some ringwork.

Although I encouraged her in her efforts, I didn't count reps, time her or direct her what to do (outside of a minor form correction and having her repeat a cartwheel that I missed because I was in the middle of a pirouette attempt). She moved directly from one activity to another for almost the entire length of my warm up (approx. 20 minutes). Her activity gave me a small amount of understanding as to why Jim Thorpe failed in his efforts to imitate the actions of toddlers for a day.

I am pleased that she has chosen to follow my example and pursue physical activity on a regular basis. However, I hope that she never feels pressured by me. Although physical fitness and martial arts, for me, have been a tremendous source of personal enjoyment and challenge, not to mention an awesome tool through which to interpret and deal with life, I realize this is not the case for all people. As long as Julia finds something to pursue with a great amount of passion, whether it be a gymnastics, dance, art, music, math, debate or whatever, I think I'll be satisfied (as long as it's constructive - smoking weed doesn't quite qualify).

Michael, thanks for making the reference to goanimal. It's one of my favorite sites. Although I wasn't to impressed initially with their exercises and games sections, they now make perfect sense when the world of children is considered, especially in light of what you've said. I had planned on teaching Julia primal hopscotch today, but she injured her ankle. She decided to forego the slide option and instead jumped off the top of her playset.

-Ryan
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sport instruction for young kid Jason Naubur Community 9 06-01-2007 05:44 PM
For those with young kids... Brian Taylor Starting 17 05-30-2007 10:30 AM
Dairy and Children Nathan Stanley Nutrition 19 04-05-2006 06:09 AM
A roomful of young women...and young men...doing the O lifts Dan John Exercises 3 09-09-2005 06:38 PM
Resistance Training for Children Paul Scott Suliin Fitness 17 05-15-2005 04:02 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.