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Old 04-02-2009, 12:15 PM   #1
Jack Stetson
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Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

I was reviewing the article referenced below and thought I’d throw out some of the key points.

Interesting article overall, and worth a read. I don’t necessarily agree with all points, but thought I’d put it out there for informational purposes. Some of these key points seem ridiculously obvious, but the authors included them for completeness sake. The macronutrient split does not look Zone to me as this is a carbohydrate rich set of recommendations.

Key Points from: Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance
Journal of the American Dietetic Association - Volume 109, Issue 3 (March 2009)

-- Athlete’s must consume adequate energy during periods of high-intensity training. Low energy intake may lead to loss of muscle mass and increased risk of injury/illness.

-- Approximately 50 to 60% of energy during 1-4 hours of continuous exersize at 70% VO2max comes from carbohydtrates with the remainder comming from free fatty acids. As the intensity of the exercises is reduced, the proportion of energy derived from free fatty acids increases.

-- With increased aerobic training, a greater propotion of energy used during exercise comes from free fatty acids. ("A trained individual uses a greater percentage of fat than an untrained person does at the same workload.")

-- Carbohydrate recommendations are for 6-10g/kg body weight per day.

-- Protein recommendations are for 1.2-1.7g/kg body weight per day.

-- Fat intake should be 20-35% of total energy intake.

-- Athletes who do restrict energy intake, consume high- or low-carbohydrate diets of low micronutrient density are at highest risk for micronutrient deficiencies.

-- Dehydration decreases exercise performance, adequate fluid intake is required before, during, and after exercise. Post-fluid replacement requires approximately 16-24oz per pound body weight lost during exercise.

-- Pre-exercise snacks should be low in fat and fiber, high in carbohydrate, and moderate in protein. (And well tolerated.)

-- During exercise, the primary goal is to replace lost fluids and carbohydrates (30-60g/hour). Primarily of importance in endurance events.

-- Post exercise, goals include fluid, electrolyte, and carbohydrate replacement. Recommendations include intake of 1-1.5g/kg body weight of carbohydrate within the first 30min, and then again every 2 hours for 4 to 6 hours to replace glycogen. Protein intake may help build and repair muscle tissue.

-- Vitamin and mineral supplements are generally not required if an athlete is eating a varied, balanced diet. Athletes eliminating major food groups or restricting energy intake or recovering form injury may benefit from supplements.

-- Vegetarian athletes may be at increased risk for lower intake of energy, protein, fat, and key micronutrients (iron, calcium, Vit D, Vit B-12, riboflavin, and zinc.).
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Last edited by Jack Stetson : 04-02-2009 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 04-02-2009, 12:40 PM   #2
Danni Coffman
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

Do all athletes have the same protein requirements? I doubt it but I don't know. People whose focus is weight lifting would seem to want more protein than distance runners. Thoughts?

Last edited by Danni Coffman : 04-02-2009 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 04-03-2009, 06:21 AM   #3
Darryl Shaw
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Stetson View Post
I was reviewing the article referenced below and thought Iíd throw out some of the key points.

Interesting article overall, and worth a read. I donít necessarily agree with all points, but thought Iíd put it out there for informational purposes. Some of these key points seem ridiculously obvious, but the authors included them for completeness sake. The macronutrient split does not look Zone to me as this is a carbohydrate rich set of recommendations.

Key Points from: Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance
Journal of the American Dietetic Association - Volume 109, Issue 3 (March 2009)

-- Athleteís must consume adequate energy during periods of high-intensity training. Low energy intake may lead to loss of muscle mass and increased risk of injury/illness.

-- Approximately 50 to 60% of energy during 1-4 hours of continuous exersize at 70% VO2max comes from carbohydtrates with the remainder comming from free fatty acids. As the intensity of the exercises is reduced, the proportion of energy derived from free fatty acids increases.

-- With increased aerobic training, a greater propotion of energy used during exercise comes from free fatty acids. ("A trained individual uses a greater percentage of fat than an untrained person does at the same workload.")

-- Carbohydrate recommendations are for 6-10g/kg body weight per day.

-- Protein recommendations are for 1.2-1.7g/kg body weight per day.

-- Fat intake should be 20-35% of total energy intake.

-- Athletes who do restrict energy intake, consume high- or low-carbohydrate diets of low micronutrient density are at highest risk for micronutrient deficiencies.

-- Dehydration decreases exercise performance, adequate fluid intake is required before, during, and after exercise. Post-fluid replacement requires approximately 16-24oz per pound body weight lost during exercise.

-- Pre-exercise snacks should be low in fat and fiber, high in carbohydrate, and moderate in protein. (And well tolerated.)

-- During exercise, the primary goal is to replace lost fluids and carbohydrates (30-60g/hour). Primarily of importance in endurance events.

-- Post exercise, goals include fluid, electrolyte, and carbohydrate replacement. Recommendations include intake of 1-1.5g/kg body weight of carbohydrate within the first 30min, and then again every 2 hours for 4 to 6 hours to replace glycogen. Protein intake may help build and repair muscle tissue.

-- Vitamin and mineral supplements are generally not required if an athlete is eating a varied, balanced diet. Athletes eliminating major food groups or restricting energy intake or recovering form injury may benefit from supplements.

-- Vegetarian athletes may be at increased risk for lower intake of energy, protein, fat, and key micronutrients (iron, calcium, Vit D, Vit B-12, riboflavin, and zinc.).
I'm in full agreement with all of those recommendations and I believe that people here would benefit enormously if they ditched all that Zone bullsh*t and followed this advice.
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Old 04-03-2009, 07:22 AM   #4
Brandon Head
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

Almost sounds like the recommendations made in "Paleo Diet for Athletes"...
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Old 04-03-2009, 08:55 AM   #5
James Compora
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

so what does that end up being, like 40-40-20 C/P/F? That is telling me that at 88kg i need ~600g of carbs a day?
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:23 AM   #6
Jack Stetson
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danni Coffman View Post
Do all athletes have the same protein requirements? I doubt it but I don't know. People whose focus is weight lifting would seem to want more protein than distance runners. Thoughts?
I don't think anybody really knows. This particular position paper--in reviewing the avaliable evidence--says, "There is not a strong body of evidence documenting that additional dietary protein is needed by healthy adults who undertake endurance or resistance exercise."

The article does differentiate between strength and endurance athletes and gives protein intake ranges for both: Strength 1.2 to 1.7g/kg body weight daily, Endurance 1.2 -1.4 g/kg/day.

But what is a CrossFitter?

I saw one study that demonstrated that muscle growth required minimally increased protein requirements, maybe 10-16 grams per day. The current RDA recommendation is 0.8gm/Kg/day. Increasing protein to 1.2g/Kg/day would add 28gms of protein for a 70kg athlete. Seemingly more than enough for muscle growth.

The above recommendations are based off nitrogen balance studies. Many studies show that trained individuals become more adept at conserving and utilizing protein. This adaptation is why many people feel athletes do not really require significantly increased protein consumption.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:45 AM   #7
Jack Stetson
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Compora View Post
so what does that end up being, like 40-40-20 C/P/F? That is telling me that at 88kg i need ~600g of carbs a day?
Seems excessive to me too.

However, there have been some studies demonstrating increased glycogen stores and performance for individuals consuming a diet of >65% carbohydrate.

This position paper does not advocate for a fixed percentage of intake for protein and carbohydrate, but rather a weight and activity based range (6-10gm/Kg body weight for carbs).
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:58 AM   #8
Scott Erb
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Re: Nutrition and Athletic performance postion paper

FYI... Ran the numbers for my size (about 85Kg) using the high end of PRO (1.7 g/KG) and FAT (35% daily cal) and the low end of CHO (6g/Kg) and came up with the following:

CHO: 510g/day = 51% cal
PRO: 145g/day = 14% cal
FAT: solved for 35% cal = 156 g/day

so about 50/15/35...
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