CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Starting
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Starting For newcomers to the CrossFit methodology

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-07-2004, 09:54 PM   #1
Tom Schneitter
Member Tom Schneitter is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: San Francisco  CA
Posts: 132
Hello everyone. I have been reading posts on this board for awhile. I am very impressed with the concept of Crossfit, the knowledge ot those within the community and the willingness to share that knowledge with everyone. I seek gudance from others in the community regarding the selection of a martial arts style. I want to become active in an art that is street oriented and emphasizes very strenuous conditioning.I am leaning toward Kajukenbo and Krav Maga. Are there other styles that I should consider? Thanks for any feedback
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 01:49 AM   #2
Graham Hayes
Member Graham Hayes is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Sidmouth  Devon
Posts: 880
Check the teachers out if you want something street oriented. Kajukenbo and Krav Maga may be good for real life situations but the teachers could be useless in a real life situation.
For the conditioning again it will depend on the teacher rather than the style. One school I attended said we should be doing conditioning in our own time as they prefered to teach fighting.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 01:51 AM   #3
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
Tom-

Welcome to CrossFit! What martial arts style....yikes!!! This question in and of itself can get a fight started! From both an efficacy and conditioning position I think brasilian Jiu-jitsu and thai boxing are tough to beat. Add in some grecco/freestyle wrestling and you have some pretty scary stuff there.


This happens to be the core curriculum of Straight Blast Gym:

www.straightblastgym.com

If you can find any of their affiliates I suspect you will thouroughly enjoy it.

Let us know what you go with and pleas do keep us posted on your progress with CrossFit.
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 05:41 AM   #4
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
I'll stir up some controversy here and say, the style doesn't matter as much as most people think! I believe it's the styles ability to develop individual attributes that makes it an effecive self defense art. I could argue all sides of this because I've been involved in high level martial arts for 23 years. Grappling is great, but not so great against multiple opponents or a guy with a weapon. Boxing is great but you hit a guy in the skull and your breaking a hand. Kicking is great but not so great on the street in dress pants, on ice (IMO high kicks for self defense should remain in the movies). Everything has a place, time and range. Combat is like a conversation: learn the alphabet (punch, kick, holds, traps, etc), learn sentences (combinations, ie: round kick to thigh jab, cross, elbow, cross), then train in the art of conversation (sparring: all distances including grappling standing and on the ground). So pick an art, get good at it, identify your own weaknesses (like. . .I suck at grappling), then make efforts to get better at grappling (I suck at grappling, therefore I'm going to train with Ryan Atkins). Look for a great instructor not for the latest MA fad. Ultimately MA is about life and understanding you role in it and becoming a better person. I'm a cop (15 years) and work in and around the city of Chicago, I was on a SWAT team, rode in an individual squad car (State Trooper), and am now a detective; I could count on one hand the amount of times I used my MA training in combat. So, look at this as somthing to develop yourself with the side benefit of making you combativly effective.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 09:17 AM   #5
Beth Moscov
Member Beth Moscov is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Boulder Creek  CA
Posts: 1,269
HI,

I just read something worth considering when choosing a martial art. Consider what you want out of it. Consider where you might really be attacked and find a way to get skills in that way. I love BJJ for many reasons but one is that, as a small female, I am likely to be attacked, knocked down, and have rape attempted. BJJ gives me leverage skills that work against bigger opponents plus experience on the ground. Anyway, I think if you consider what it is you might encounter, then use Larry's ideas and the rest of the folks here, you will find what is right for you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 09:40 AM   #6
George Koupatadze
Member George Koupatadze is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Arlington Heights  IL
Posts: 110
Tom, what everybody said here is right. I'll have to agree with Robb though. The straightblast gym seems to have an awesome, comprehensive curriculum. I don't know how close San Fransisco is to Berkley but one of the SBG locations is in Berkley. Check this out:

http://www.moderncombatives.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 04:35 PM   #7
Roy Taylor
Member Roy Taylor is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Rowlett  TX
Posts: 146
Tom,

Im in a similar situation(in a way) I've been in Olympic(WTF) Taekwondo for a year and a half, and am thinking about giving it up (when my contract is over) for kickboxing with friends. Why? Kickboxing, IMHO, is probably the best stand up tool in a weaponless fight out there. As long as, like Larry said, keep high fancy kicks in the movies. Four limbs are always better than two, IMO.

Another reason I may give up TKD is because of forms and tests. We spend a lot of time on forms and strange strikes(i.e. bearclaw strike, useless in any situation) and tests are getting expensive.

I agree that any art involving more than just your fists or just legs and is centered around sparring is excellent for conditioning.

for the street, the best style would probably be Sprinting. get the hell out of any situation if possible. you just never know how nutty they could get. Hope this shed some light.

Cheers

Roy
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 05:38 PM   #8
Beth Moscov
Member Beth Moscov is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Boulder Creek  CA
Posts: 1,269
Hey Roy - maybe you could answer a question for me about Olympic style tkd? I went and watched the Olympic trials (which was cool - they were along with the Judo trials and the whole day was great). What I didn't understand was that the fighters just left their arms hanging at their sides. They never used them at all, except for maybe a counter weight. Is this cause of olympic rules? I do a Korean kickboxing type of martial art along with my BJJ and we always have our hands up protecting our faces and we do use punches (just not as often as kicks). So, I guess I am confused as to whether there are different styles of tae kwon do and what the Olympic rules are - if you can help me out before I watch them on TV in a week or two that would be great.

Beth
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 05:53 PM   #9
Jeff Martin
Affiliate Jeff Martin is offline
 
Jeff Martin's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Ramona  Ca.
Posts: 1,318
Tom,
First of all welcome to CrossFit. Whatever you choose to do will be enhanced by the fitness and athletisicsm you gain from CrossFit. I probably like Roy's answer best. Work the sprints. The best defense is the sneaker defense. I spent several years in FMA, JKD, and Kenpo. Our Kenpo system is heavily influenced by kajukenbo, so I have a fondness for the art. I appreciate Larry's answer it was very complete and right on point. That having been said, a few years ago I began Krav Maga. I would highly recommend it. It is a great place to start. I know one of the KM instructors in S.F. I don't think you would go wrong by checking in with him. But then I would also add never stop learning, check out the Filipino Martial Arts and of course grappling arts. Roy what do you mean by "contract" and tests are expensive?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 08:14 PM   #10
Roy Taylor
Member Roy Taylor is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Rowlett  TX
Posts: 146
Beth--just like you can't use your legs to kick in boxing, you can't punch in Taekwondo. You can do what is known as "cover punch" to knock an opponent off balance and/or to create distance to kickk. The cover punch itself does not count as a point and can only be delivered to the opponent's chest. The sparring itself is quite frustrating, but the payoff is huge if you get good at it. It can't seem to enjoy it enough to get good at it. Thats just me, though.

Jeff--attending my TKD class is set up just like a health club membership. im on a one year contract with the dojo. To test for a belt promotion, it costs anywhere from $35-$200 depending on the level you're at, and are done every 2-3 months. Since Im heading toward a budget crisis soon, I may not attend anymore after the contract is over and just kickbox with friends instead. I might work on my sprinting too :wink:

Cheers

Roy
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Martial arts in Seattle?? Adrian Dowst CrossPit 4 09-20-2006 08:24 PM
Anyone do any Martial Arts? Ben Fanjoy CrossPit 5 07-18-2006 03:12 PM
Entry to martial arts Mitchell Brown CrossPit 5 07-11-2006 03:14 PM
WOD and martial arts Wim Lokate Starting 11 10-25-2005 08:09 AM
Martial Arts? Parth Shah Starting 13 05-07-2003 07:02 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:02 AM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.