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Injuries Chronic & Acute

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Old 06-11-2007, 11:50 AM   #1
Darren Zega
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I was browsing the boards and couldn't find anything related to this so I was wondering if any of you had ever heard of anything similar...

I have one flat foot (the flexible kind, not rigid) and one regular arched foot. In the past, I've had a decent amount of pain, but nothing too extreme. After about two and a half months of serious Crossfitting, though, I'm starting to get some serious pain to the point that it’s limiting my performance. I usually feel it in the patellar and IT areas on the flat footed leg but not the normal one.

Since only one foot is flat, short of laying out a ton of money for custom insoles or shoes, do any have any knowledge on how to deal with the problem?

Thanks if anyone has any information on the subject.
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Old 06-11-2007, 05:40 PM   #2
Joey Powell
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I have this problem and I relate it Speed Skating as a teenager. Right foot is much flatter than the left. All that "go fast - turn left" must have done a number on my ligamnents and tendons.

I have picked up POSE running style and have noticed a serious strength gain in my feet and increased stability.
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Old 06-12-2007, 07:34 AM   #3
Garrett Smith
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POSE drills and running will help.

Jumping rope (especially barefoot) will help too.

Foot drills before every workout (don't underestimate them): work/fam safe http://wellness.ndsu.nodak.edu/fitne...footDrills.pdf

Until you start regaining an arch, I'd highly suggest you stick to mainly unilateral leg exercises--the key is always focusing on lifting the arch through muscular activity. Don't go deeper or do more reps than you can maintain the arch in the foot. You will improve your arch with time, as well as your depth on the exercises. You should start with simply balancing on one foot and keeping the arch held high.

And yes, your arch(es) will be sore as heck for a period of time, you're waking up muscles that have been underactive for a long time.

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Old 06-13-2007, 05:50 AM   #4
Darren Zega
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Chuck and Garrett,

Thanks for the advice. I tried doing the foot drills and they apparently woke up a bunch of mucscles in my calves that hadn't been used in a while.

I also did some reading on pose running, and it looks like a great concept. It's probably been beaten to death on the forums in the past, but as far as pose running shoes go, will my motion control running shoes prevent me from learning the style properly, or should I dive right in and worry about a racing style shoe later?
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Old 06-13-2007, 07:21 AM   #5
Emily Mattes
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Darren, try walking barefoot for a bit. It will strengthen your feet tremendously. I can't find the thread, but there was another flat-footed Crossfitter who said within a few weeks of barefoot walking and foot strengthening drills his feet began to develop arches.

I have tried learning POSE in motion control shoes and it's possible, but difficult. I've been doing it barefoot instead, but my feet are pretty calloused from years of walking barefoot so if you're not used to barefooting you should be careful about tearing your feet up. You may want to alternate regular running with walking barefoot and practicing POSE until you get to the point where it is worth it to buy a whole new pair of shoes.
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Old 06-13-2007, 07:49 AM   #6
Garrett Smith
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Darren,
An investment in the POSE book and video, along with some shoes, will be well worth it.

At the very least, get some Nike Frees for your daily wear.

You're on the right track. Get barefoot as much as possible, and lift the arch whenever you think of it.
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Old 06-13-2007, 12:13 PM   #7
Darren Zega
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I've done some reading on the posetech forums and they seems to think that the nike free is satan incarnate. What are all of your thoughts, before I take the plunge and buy some?
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Old 06-14-2007, 08:22 AM   #8
Garrett Smith
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For daily wear, I think the Nike Frees are fine.

If one does a lot of running, they should get some lower-profile & flatter shoes (or the Vibram Fivefingers, I'm waiting to get some).

Running in a more efficient & healthier style does not require a specific shoe. However, the bigger the shoe one runs in, the more it becomes like lifting weights in gloves--you can't feel the ground and the shoe dictates how your foot/leg complex reacts (when it should be the other way around).

I just got a pair of the Free 3.0s off the Nike store site, they're really light and comfortable. I can't stand the 5.0 running shoes, it's like standing on a jello mold.
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