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Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

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Old 05-06-2005, 03:40 AM   #1
Kenneth Ritchie
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People in society seem to complicate this subject in their own head and think that there is some wonderful scientific answer to their weight dilema. More often than not, when I give advice to clients in my gym I ask them to quickly give me at least 3 things that they know they are doing wrong and yes you guessed it.... they did. For most people in society nutrition does not have to be complicated but simply a re-adjustment of what they are doing with their present eating habits. There is obviously the more indepth side to nutrition for those who need it for either medical reasons or sports performance etc. but for the average joe its usually the obligatory burgers and chips scenario.
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Old 05-06-2005, 03:57 AM   #2
Peter Galloway
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I think for many people over-complicating things is a way of avoiding actually doing something about the problem. I've been guilty of this myself - when I decided last year I wanted to get myself back in shape I spent months surfing the web reading through countless fitness and nutrition pages. I thought I was doing something about my poor fitness just by researching the subject, but in reality I should have simply spent that time making sensible nutritional choices and doing basic calisthenics (both of which I knew plenty about, much like the people in your gym Ken).

Still, all's well that ends well, because I eventually discovered CrossFit and haven't looked back since!
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Old 05-06-2005, 04:59 AM   #3
Larry Lindenman
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Good point, both of you guys. Kenneth, that's why keeping an accurate nutrition journal is such a powerful tool for novice and advanced. Peter, I saw (sometimes see) that on this board...lots of questions about why, when, how, prior to starting. Also we see..."I want to add CF type workouts into my current Buns for Life program..." Not saying CF is the be all end all of fitness (even though it is) but people need to stop fence sitting and jump in for three months. When John Walsh was going through his "my Dr. associates believe the Zone can't work phase (:lame:), my reply is...TRY IT. If it doesn't work in three months STOP, go back to what you were doing. Coach's black box illustration is perfect for this.
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Old 05-06-2005, 07:15 AM   #4
Jason Simpkins
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I agree that people over complicate nutrition and exercise. It seems that a plethora of egg heads attempt in vain to find the secret genetic code or super drug that will finally solve the "obesity epidemic".

To me, that just means they want to find a way for people to lose weight without any effort. I'm often flabbergasted by how ignorant the average individual is when it comes to their own body. We have a fitness show here in Toronto where people call in to a panel of industry experts and get answers to their health and fitness questions. You wouldn't believe the amount of calls they get where someone says," You know, all I really care about is having a flat tummy." As if a flat gut is the only true measure of health.

Kenneth you are right about people knowing what they are doing wrong, but for many food is an addiction. After all, food is a drug that has powerful hormonal responses in the body. I've come to realize that the emotional attachment to food is a tough thing for many to overcome.

If people would simply stop listening to scientists and food advertisements so much and just went back to the basics, things would be a whole lot easier for them. If you look at the past models of hunter gatherer societies that lived off of the land and performed functional movements daily, you will find very little disease and obesity. I'm willing to bet that you'd be hard pressed to find a Kalahari bush man sitting around the camp fire, asking his fellow tribes men, "Does this loin cloth make me look fat?"
:happy:
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:07 AM   #5
Neill S. Occhiogrosso
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for many food is an addiction

If people . . . just went back to the basics


I think that's just the problem. The one thing about nutrition (or quitting smoking, or alcoholism) that is complicated, is that we haven't figured out how to break addiction. The people on this website are almost all very disciplined. To solve the obesity problem, we need to address the people whom Kenneth mentioned--they know what they're doing wrong, and do it anyway.
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:37 AM   #6
Brad Hirakawa
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"Does this loin cloth make me look fat?"

I bet the other cavemen would look at they guy with some body fat and think, "Man, gotta hang out with this guy, he knows where the food is!"

LMAO!!!

:-)
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:41 AM   #7
Jason Simpkins
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True, addictions are another monster unto themselves. Personally I've found that the key to overcoming any addiction is to change your emotional attachment to the particular vice, while also dealing with the real reasons we are self medicating.

Since addictions are pleasures, it also helps when giving one up, to replace it with another pleasure of a positive long term outlook (eg. Crossfit) in order to avoid that empty feeling of loss. Also changing habitual patterns that trigger that wanting urge and sometimes even separating yourself from toxic people who influence you negatively can help a great deal.

Some great tools are methods such as Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) that help those addicted to find the source of their pain that they are covering up with food (or whatever) and then change the emotional connection.

For example, every time I tasted Pepsi, it brought back vivid memories of summer's with my family on vacation up north at the cottage. These were fun, pleasant memories which I could access anytime with a can of pop. But now that I realize the devastating impact pop has on my health, I have shifted my emotional connection from fond memories to liquid poison... I haven't touch the stuff ever since.

Although, for most people, I suspect that they are just unhappy with their lot in life, so junk food gives them that temporary rush or high of dopamine making them feel good. I think that if people were truly happy, they would treat their body with much more respect.
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:44 AM   #8
Jason Simpkins
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LOL! :lol:

That's true Brad... but then again if they were cannibals, they might think the fat guy would make a good rump roast!
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Old 05-06-2005, 12:53 PM   #9
Kenneth Ritchie
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There were a few good points made by all of you such as larry when you mentioned the fact that people should at least try something before disbelieving it. I find it irratating when people create a problem ie. the fat body, then complain about it, yet do nothing about it. Jason I so agree with the statement about individuals and their obsession with the 'flat tummy' syndrome as if that were a true representation of health. I have lost count of how many times I have recited my university stuff to people about what actually encompasses the word 'HEALTH'. The addiction theory is so very true and yip when I try and discuss the matter with clients I do look upon it as that of someone on drugs, alcohol etc. I really have to credit my studies for this though which was part of the reason why I wrote the post on 'educating long term gym users' and 'the value of education in health and fitness'. Its the behind the scenes part of training, health etc that facinates me and will post a discussion on the psychology of it all soon. Thanks guys for the comments. Kenny
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Old 05-06-2005, 04:07 PM   #10
Jason Simpkins
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I find that a great way to get people to see my point of view is to sell them the BS like, "You'll have rock hard abs or lose 5 dress sizes fast or get buffed and score more chicks!" Blah, blah, blah... This is what people want to hear, a candy coated version of the truth. It's easy and it appeals to their base desires. Then without them even realizing it, train them and slowly feed them morsels of wisdom and over time you'll have them eating properly and crossfitting their hearts out!
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