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Old 06-24-2008, 08:36 PM   #1
Gaurav Choudhary
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Instability Anterior Labral Tear

Hey guys.
I had a left shoulder dislocation in 2002 and every now and then the shoulder would pop out of its socket but luckily enough I could pop it back in (yes it hurts each time it happens). I had gotten an MRI done in December 2006 and the orthopedic doc said that it was an Anterior Labral Tear suggesting the ligament holding the joint together is not tight enough to hold the socket in place. He said that arthroscopic surgery could be performed but I tended to try PT.
Fast forward to present day where I haven't sustained another episode of my shoulder popping out. But recently after doing kipping pullups and trying to get a full extension at the bottom of the kip (where you swing forward), my shoulder popped out of the socket. I tried my own methods of PT for my rotator cuffs and shoulder but i don't know if i'm doing the correct exercises. Would others who have sustained this injury recommend getting surgery or try PT again to build up the muscle. I don't know if I want to be in Rehab for 4 months and not do crossfit.
Thanks for any suggestions/opinions.
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Old 06-25-2008, 08:51 PM   #2
Frank E Morel
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

maybe you should ask a pt if your are doing the right exercises. do a walk in appoint and pay out of pocket vs insurance.. if you do insurance.. you may need a referral.
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:31 AM   #3
Gaurav Choudhary
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

I've been doing a lot of reading from the board regarding problems with shoulder injuries and have learned a lot. Most important fact was to improve your posture. The shoulder rehab link performed by DieselCrew on youtube seems to work for many others as a great PT and rehab. Perform dead-hangs to get comfortable with reaching a full-lockout. Try some Turkish Get-Ups. Jeff Martone had some serious shoulder injuries/surgeries and is proof that with sustaining such injuries, by building the muscle in the shoulder joint, you can achieve some amazing stuff.
Started some rehab on my shoulder so I hope in the near future everything gets better!
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Old 06-28-2008, 03:29 AM   #4
Max Philipsson
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

I had surgery due to the same type of injurie. Bankart surgery. I injured my right shoulder and tried to rest for several weeks turning in to months. Finally i got the surgery 12 march this year. I`ve had a hellish time and is still not fully recovered. But on the other hand i would have had no success without the surgery. The biceps tendon has one out off two origin in that exact place. There is a little lip there called (labrum) who can be torn if you do heavy weights, overhead work (repeetedly), throwing and such. I probably got my tear from kipping pullups.

Rehab has been motion exercises and lots of r.cuff workouts. Been working like hell on my posture and hopefully i`ll be less acceptable to this kind of injurie in the future. People who has f.rotated shoulders is more often at risk. Try to get your shoulderblades closer to eachother in relaxed posture by training specifik exercises wich engages trapezius transversus, rombhoids and all off the muscles involved in the r.cuff.

Good luck
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Old 07-04-2008, 02:59 PM   #5
Chris Bounds
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

Hey,

I had a similar injury to my shoulder. It dislocated while I was punching on the bag in 2001 and afterwards dislocations were chronic. I found a good surgeon that said my labrum was torn and could not be healed with PT (as I tried). I could help prevent easy dislocations but surgery would the most effective. It was not as bad as I thought (except sleeping on your back for a few weeks) and the PT went well (I was 24 so youth helped). It took about 4 months of PT to get 90-95% of my flexibility back. After that he let me PT on my own. It is good to get back into fitness as soon as practical to help healing but unfortunately I got lazy and went another 6 months. However now 1.5yrs later I have 100% of my flexibility with very minor side effects. I have a slight winged scapula which causes slightly less strength in that shoulder - which I think I could have prevented had I started my fitness progression sooner after PT. Overall - very worth the time and $ if you are highly active and your shoulder causes chronic problems!

Hope this helps!
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Old 07-19-2008, 12:33 AM   #6
Benjamin Brock
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

I have the exact same type of injury you do, and have been dealing with it for years(7 to be exact).

I'm in the Army, where they don't like to pay for expensive surgeries unless EVERY single avenue from PT to witchcraft has already been pursued. I was finally able to get an MRI after years of PT, and ibuprofen, naproxen, voltaren and celebrex until I couldn't stand the ulcers anymore. And guess what the results were? Anterior labrum tear, SLAP lesion, and loose connective tissue, which were causing a host of other problems.

And the whole time they had been calling it "tendinosis w/ perceived instability" and saying it would go away on its own with PT. Well, it never has. I finally got scheduled for surgery, after years of fighting for it, only to have it cancelled and be sent to Iraq because it was "non-life-threatening" and was told I could reschedule it once I got back.

I'm in the process of doing that now, but in the meantime I've done a lot to try to help it, exercise-wise, with limited success. I've done a lot of rotator cuff exercises that my PT prescribed, but the only things that really seem to make a difference is to do one-armed pulldowns and dumbell pullovers, with light to moderate weight. I think that helps with the instability a lot, and makes it less likely to hurt during shoulder/chest exercises.

You could probably get similar results with regular ol' pullups too. But if you're anything like me, pullups hurt quite a bit at the bottom, especially kipping. So I generally give my shoulder a lot of rest in between pullup sessions, and I don't kip much at all, nor do I completely lock out at the bottom. It looks like I'm locked out, but there is still always a great deal of muscle tension in there to take pressure off my shoulder. As a result, I have to scale some of the pullup-intensive workouts.

Another thing that has helped, believe it or not, is just doing as much delt work as I can reasonably tolerate, hitting the posterior head a lot as well. By strengthening my shoulder and everything around/attached to it as much as possible, I have been able to work around the instability a lot. It's been a painful process, but has helped, almost to the point that I'm not sure I want surgery anymore. I still have pain, especially after workouts, but can now bench 305 and put 215 overhead (spilt jerk).

One last thing, think "Active Shoulders" in anything you do involving the shoulder. Imagine actively pulling with the stabilizers and using the lats and pecs to keep your shoulders in place when lifting. I have learned to do that quite well, and it was the turning point in my training progression. I seriously can't lift a stapler without doing that.

Hope this helps. I noticed you didn't get many replies, so I assume not too many people are familiar with this type of injury.
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Old 07-19-2008, 09:32 PM   #7
David Bittner
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

Posture is very important. A forward posture limits shoulder ROM and increases shear and impingment at the Acromial clavicular joint. Don't try to figure it out on your own seek professional help.
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Old 07-22-2008, 08:12 PM   #8
John Schroeder
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Re: Instability Anterior Labral Tear

I would recommend getting it fixed. In my own case I had the labral tear, plus bone spurs, plus bursitus, plus detached bicepts tendon. I am not sure but I think I did the main damage with heavy bench press sets. Several weeks after the bench press event with no improvment, I went to the Doc. He thought just bursitus and tried cortisone shots. After 4 months and no improvement, another shot. A few more months and a different doc. This one spotted the wing scapula and ordered the MRI. Shortly thereafter I had the surgery. The reason I say get it fixed is that during the time I was waiting for the doc(s) to find out what was really wrong I continued to damage the joint. For almost 8 months I struggled to work around the pain and the result was damage to the head of the humerus that is now permanent.

It is now about 7 months post surgery. I have been through physical therapy and have been released to regular exercise for about 3 months. The doc insisted that I do no body weight exercise for some time. He did allow that it might be OK if I start weight lifting with light weight and increase by no more than 10 lbs per week. I have done just that using the Starting Strength program. Last week I got my first post-surgery pullups without assist and next week I am going to try Crossfit again, but VERY CAREFULLY. So far the repaired shoulder is more pain free than the un-repaired one. However, the repaired shoulder still feels fragile so I guess I have a ways to go before I am fully back to Crossfit (hope the cleans haven't redamaged it - the doc and wife have some sort of bet on how long before I screw it up again, if I have the i-told-you-so's will be intolerable). Because the Doc did not recognize the problem immediately, I have lost more than a year of progress already, and still don't know how close to total recovery the end result will be.

Finally, anyone out there have thoughts about how and when to resume Crossfit after an injury like this?
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