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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 07-31-2011, 09:23 PM   #11
Shane Skowron
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

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Originally Posted by Chris Hede View Post
Is not all movement inherently functional?

I'm inclined to agree. Everything is functional for something.

I guess what people care about is what what is functional for many things.
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Old 07-31-2011, 09:36 PM   #12
Rob Samuels
 
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

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Is not all movement inherently functional?
This^^
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Old 08-02-2011, 12:47 AM   #13
Mauricio Leal
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

High power output.
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Old 08-02-2011, 01:21 AM   #14
Helen M Brennan
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

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Originally Posted by Bill M. Hesse View Post
I would say it is a movement that enhances everyday activities, not replicates them.
yes! yes! yes!

no point in arriving at 100 yo and be unable to get to or on and off your toilet..

H
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Old 08-02-2011, 07:18 AM   #15
Andrew James
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

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Originally Posted by Jonathan Vechet View Post
Something is functional if it performs its intended purpose, or at least what you want it to do.

People constantly say doing "isolation" movements, ala bodybuilding, are nonfunctional. But they are functional in the sense that those movements function in the manner that the bodybuilder wants them to.
Isolation movements can also be very useful to help balance out strength deficiencies.

As examples, barbell curls can improve pullup numbers if weak biceps are the cause of low pullup numbers and grip work can improve a deadlift if grip strength is the cause of a weak deadlift.

Last edited by Andrew James : 08-02-2011 at 07:20 AM.
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Old 08-02-2011, 07:43 AM   #16
adam adkins
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

"Functional movement" - definition - A term dbags use to feel self-important and superior to others.

"Functional" is the new "muscle confusion" which was the new "core." Basically just marketing BS.

** No offense to the OP obviously and I am not calling anyone here names. I just hate the use of the term.

Last edited by adam adkins : 08-02-2011 at 08:05 AM.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:37 PM   #17
Michael Capalbo
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

I would define a "functional movement" as a movement that requires a large number of muscles across different joints working together. Extra points if the muscles have to be working together precisely to successfully complete the movement (coordination).

The deadlift is a functional movement. The heavy squat is a functional movement. The heavy overhead squat is definitely a functional movement according to the above definition because even though you do less work than you would in a heavy back squat (you use less weight), you need a lot more coordination. Slack anywhere in your core and you'll miss your overhead squat. The one-legged squat is definitely a functional movement. Your stabilizers in your leg and core has to keep you balanced or you'll just fall over. So is the snatch definitely a functional movement.

Muscle-ups--definitely functional. Pull-ups--functional. You're using your arms and back muscles. Kipping pull-ups--definitely functional. It takes less arm and back strength than strict, but much more coordination between the (more powerful) hip flexors and arms, to do a kipping.

Dips are definitely functional if done on rings. Less so done on bars. The stabilizer muscles have to kick in to successfully do a dip on rings.

The bicep curl is hardly a functional movement according to the above definition (even though "real life" probably requires a bicep curl at least as much as a good overhead squat) because it just uses the elbow and wrist joints. Same thing for tricep pressdowns and wrist curls and the other "isolation" movements. Even though sometimes wrist curls are needed for say grip strength in the deadlift.

Last edited by Michael Capalbo : 08-02-2011 at 11:42 PM.
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Old 08-03-2011, 06:19 AM   #18
Michael Capalbo
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

And I would say that "functional" is a sliding scale and not binary. All movements are have some functionality, and there is "more functional", "less functional", ect...
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Old 08-03-2011, 06:32 AM   #19
Eric Schubring
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

I just got my CF-L1 last month, so it's all still fresh for me.

"Functional" movements involve universal motor recruitment patterns performed from core to extremity. They are compound movements (not isolation) that involve more than one joint. A functional movement would be a squat, a leg extension would not.
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Old 08-03-2011, 07:19 AM   #20
Lewis Dunn
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Re: Define "functional movement" in your own words?

Can anyone tell me why they care at all what “functional movement” means? Don’t we all end up doing things in training that we think get us where we want to go in terms of fitness? Regardless of whether someone labels those things as “functional?"

I tend to go with what Pearse and Jonathan have said. I really think the term “functional movement” is just more Greg Glassman BS that is of no importance at all to anyone who thinks for themselves about how to train. I have a friend who is an expert ice climber. He spends lots of time doing isometric hangs off of his ice tools. Just hangs there for as long as he can. He does similar isometric stuff for his calves. Probably relatively useless exercises for most people, and probably not “functional” by most definitions, but critical to what he does.

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Originally Posted by Pearse Shields View Post
In terms of training, something that strengthens and conditions my body to be able to produce strength suited to what I do........
The term "functional strength" means nothing if it is without context.
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Originally Posted by Jonathan Vechet View Post
Something is functional if it performs its intended purpose, or at least what you want it to do. ......
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