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Old 10-29-2011, 02:40 AM   #1
Bill M. Hesse
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Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

I am doing an essay on obesity in America and came across what must be one of the better studies I have seen. Takes a look at the Mediterranean , low-carbohydrate, and low-fat diets.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa0708681 WFS

From The Journal of New England Medicine
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:08 AM   #2
Dave Traeger
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

I only read the abstract / conclusion parts and was basically what I predicted.

What exactly did the mediteranean diet include? Those regions consume a lot of seafood, but don't they consume a fair bit of pasta too?
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:21 AM   #3
Darryl Shaw
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill M. Hesse View Post
I am doing an essay on obesity in America and came across what must be one of the better studies I have seen. Takes a look at the Mediterranean , low-carbohydrate, and low-fat diets.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa0708681 WFS

From The Journal of New England Medicine
There are a number of problems with this study -

1: The fat content of the low-fat diet was 30% of total calories so it wasn't a true low fat diet. Drs. Ornish, Mcdougal, Esselstyn et al. all recommend diets which provide no more than 10% of total calories from fat.

2: Table 2 shows that regardless of which dietary protocol they were assigned subjects ended up with fairly similar calorie and macronutrient intakes.

3: The differences in weight loss between the three groups can be explained by differences in water and glycogen stores with those eating the most CHO retaining the most water.

All this study proves is that subjects lost similar amounts of weight when they ate similar diets, which is no surprise as we already knew that weight (fat) loss depends on the extent and duration of the energy deficit not the macronutrient content of the diet.

Anyway, here's a few more studies you might want to take a look at -

Comparison of Weight-Loss Diets with Different Compositions of Fat, Protein, and Carbohydrates.

Composition of Weight Lost during Short-Term Weight Reduction.

Effects of a low-fat diet compared with those of a high-monounsaturated fat diet on body weight, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

Low-Fat Versus Low-Carbohydrate Weight Reduction Diets Effects on Weight Loss, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Risk: A Randomized Control Trial.

Persons successful at long-term weight loss and maintenance continue to consume a low-energy, low-fat diet.

A descriptive study of individuals successful at long-term maintenance of substantial weight loss.

Three-Year Weight Change in Successful Weight Losers Who Lost Weight on a Low-Carbohydrate Diet

FAO.org - Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases.

FAO.org - Carbohydrate Food Intake and Energy Balance.

Dietary Fat Intake and Regulation of Energy Balance: Implications for Obesity.

*All links wfs*
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:46 PM   #4
Bill M. Hesse
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

I knew you would pull through for me darryl. I noticed those things as well. Still, the support system used to keep relativly high adherance to the protocol was interesting to me.
What do you think about the difference in HDL numbers? I was curious that the low carb diet showed the best numbers in this regard? So much of what I hear in school suggests that your lipids go to crap on this. I did notice though, the researchers encouraged fat from vegetarian sources (olive oil, avacado?). What role if any would this play?

Last edited by Bill M. Hesse : 10-29-2011 at 06:02 PM.
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:55 PM   #5
Bill M. Hesse
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

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Originally Posted by Dave Traeger View Post
I only read the abstract / conclusion parts and was basically what I predicted.

What exactly did the mediteranean diet include? Those regions consume a lot of seafood, but don't they consume a fair bit of pasta too?
http://www.ajcn.org/content/61/6/1402S.full.pdf+html wfs
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Old 10-30-2011, 08:36 AM   #6
Lewis Dunn
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

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Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
2: Table 2 shows that regardless of which dietary protocol they were assigned subjects ended up with fairly similar calorie and macronutrient intakes.
Can you do the math for me here, because I see that table as showing that their macronutrient ratios were not at all "fairly similar" after 24 months?

All 3 groups started with similar baseline for energy intake and macronutrient ratio.

After 24 months, carb intake in g/day had changed by -83, -50 and -130.
After 24 months, protein intake in g/day had changed by -20, -18 and -7.
After 24 months, fat intake in g/day had changed by -19, -11 and -2.

So, after 24 months, the % of energy from carb, protein and fat was (all numbers rounded up):

Low fat group: 51, 19, 30
Mediterranean group: 50, 19, 33
Low Carb group: 40, 22, 39

“Fairly similar” between low-fat and low-carb? Really?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
All this study proves is that subjects lost similar amounts of weight when they ate similar diets,….
Well, maybe, provided you ignore Figures 2, 3, and 4….
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Old 10-30-2011, 09:48 AM   #7
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

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Originally Posted by Dave Traeger View Post
What exactly did the mediteranean diet include? Those regions consume a lot of seafood, but don't they consume a fair bit of pasta too?
Yes, they do. The exact balance between the two varies depending on where you are in the region, but both bread and pasta are staples. The Mediterranean diet is one of the leading counterexamples to the "grains are evil" argument.

Katherine
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Old 10-30-2011, 10:17 AM   #8
Tony Sutton
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

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Originally Posted by Dave Traeger View Post

What exactly did the mediteranean diet include? Those regions consume a lot of seafood, but don't they consume a fair bit of pasta too?
From my experiences, they also consume several courses of food. I commonly experienced 1-2 courses of consisting of a variety of non bread or pasta dishes, such as seafood, lean meats, and seasonal vegetables before eating a grain based dish. Acknowledging what is eaten with the grain dishes is an important point to look at.

Now I am hungry...
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Old 10-30-2011, 10:35 AM   #9
Rob Samuels
 
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

They have a food pyramid for the mediterranean diet in this article.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/med...n-diet/CL00011 wfs

Bread is a staple in the diet as is rice, potatos, dairy etc..

Here is another article talking about health as it relates to diet

http://www.forbes.com/2010/03/02/hea...egetables.html wfs

I pulled this exerpt out of the article because I think its important when looking at diets that are new to the scene such as Paleo.

"science doesn't have much to say about which traditional cuisines are the healthiest. It's impossible to tell whether the long life expectancies of some countries are actually the result of better health care systems, not better eating habits. No researcher has developed a method to accurately measure the comparative health benefits of one country's diet vs. another, says Harvard epidemiologist Dimitrios Trichopoulos. "We have no evidence because we don't have a yardstick," he says. There are indications that Japanese and Chinese diets, for example, are protective against chronic diseases and improve longevity, but Trichopoulos says that they haven't been studied enough to say that conclusively.

The one exception, he says, is the Mediterranean diet, high in olive oil, fruits and vegetables, and whole grains. A 2008 meta-analysis of 12 studies of 1.6 million subjects found that people who stick closely to the Mediterranean diet had a 9% lower death rate than people who ate the same diet less stringently, according to the results published in the British Medical Journal. Numerous other studies show it can protect against heart disease
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Old 10-30-2011, 11:11 AM   #10
Zach S
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Re: Since we are in the mood for sharing studies...

Im going to go eat a bagette dipped in olive oil and balsamic glaze right now.
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