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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 09-04-2005, 05:49 AM   #21
John Frazer
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Chris --

Very helpful info but can you clarify what the numbers on the right-hand side of this chart mean?

---
On the model C (grey and black) erg hold down both the "rest" and "ok" button at the same time. In the bottom right hand corner a little "drag" should appear. Hop onto the erg and pull 5-10 strokes fairly hard - a number will appear. The following is a chart regarding recomended drag:

250lbs - 139
200lbs - 132
175lbs - 125
150lbs - 120
125lbs - 114

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Old 09-04-2005, 03:15 PM   #22
Chris Wyant
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John - to answer your question the numbers down the right hand side is the drag. By moving the grill up or down on the fan - it alters the amount of wind entering therotating fan - the more wind - the more drag. Thus, the chart is saying that if you weigh 250lbs a drag of 139 is the ideal drag that one should be using for pieces.

To determine where the drag is set currently on your ergomet- simply follow the directions mentioned in an earlier post to bring up the display - take 10 strokes to figure out where it is currently and adjust from there on.
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Old 09-04-2005, 05:54 PM   #23
John Frazer
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Chris,

Thanks!

Does anyone use different drag settings depending on the distance you're going to row?

I weigh 180 and use 3 for longer efforts, but have had good results using 4 for 1-2K and 5 for Tabata intervals.
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Old 09-04-2005, 07:39 PM   #24
Bruce Kocher
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Ok I'm confused,

For background, I've began rowing during the Carter presidency. I raced in three IRA and one Eastern Sprints winning eights. I have owned or rowed every model of CII machine since 1983 and my father in-law invented the performance monitor for the model C (no feces). As he 'splained to me: The performance monitor measures power (watts). It is self calibrating. That's how you can have meaningful races between machines. The indoor rowing championships or Crash-B sprints are now a world wide event and the ability to compare scores between machines is all based upon the algorithm that measures deceleration rate. Participants may row at whatever fan setting they desire and the scores are comparable because the performace monitor is constantly calibrating the deceleration rate. The display of pace (time/500m) and work (calories) is a strictly mathematical derivative of power with a couple of constants and assumptions thrown in to give meaningful values.

That is a very circular way of saying put the fan wherever you feel like putting it. It makes no difference to your score. If you are learning to row or have lower back issues or are smaller or the mood strikes you, put the fan at a lower number and have a nice light row. You'll have to move more quickly to generate high power numbers than if you put the fan at 10. Work is work though; light/fast or heavier/slower the machine doesn't care.

Chris Kemp: 1:45s for 2000m is solid pulling. Work on relaxing back up the slide and try moving the stroke rate around a little. I would caution against rowing much above 33-34 without some specific technique coaching. Rowing around 28-30 is great work. Dropping bombs at the catch and using a lower rating is a time tested metaphor and will have carry over to your Oly and kb lifting.

Chris Wyant: 6:23 is credential enough. Very impressive (your time would have been top 15 at the 2005 crash-B sprints for lightweight men). Your unposted faster scores would place you in the top 10 rowers world wide. No interest in competing?

Best regards,
Bruce
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Old 09-04-2005, 10:06 PM   #25
Chris Wyant
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Bruce -
I think I may have met your father at one point a few years ago...Not positive. But I am well aquainted with Larry Gluckman.

However, like you said work is work. However, the body gets broken down faster working at a 10 fan setting then it does at a 4-6. The reason being that the moment you tire yourself out anarobic wise - it is hard to get anything out yourself what so ever. What I am implying is not that you will be able to pull faster at lower fan settings because its cheating the system - but instead suggesting that lowering the fan will improve your time because you will be facilitating yourself in a different manner. Working your endurance capabilities as opposed to strength ability. An easy way to describe it would be to imagine deadlifting. At a 10 fan setting you could be lifting (hypothetical) 250lbs 100 times OR you could be deadlifting 125lbs 200 times for time. One is working muscle ability for time where as the other is working your endurance - I am simply stating that for the general athlete - one may be able to sustain the 125lb weight for 200 reps as opposed to the 250lbs for 100. Sorry if this is confusing anyone - Long story short - look at the majority of the rowers at Crash-B's - How many do you see rowing at a 10? Now how many do you see rowing between 3-6. Case closed.

And in regards to competing - 2 years ago I raced in the heavyweight catagory under juniors because I did not make weight in time/ being sick didn't help at all. Talk about a painful row...I have the photos of what I looked like after - not pretty to say the least. When I pulled my 623 - it was after a summer training with Penn AC and running 8 miles a day. While a 6:23 would put me in the top 15 at Crash-B's - I was just a few months too late. And in regards to why I did not race last year? 8 months of Mono. That and now I am going heavyweight - being 6'3 and sticking under 165/160lbs is not fun - and why do it while rowing at UW when there is no LWT team?
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Old 09-04-2005, 10:11 PM   #26
Chris Wyant
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Also knowing where you set your drag at for pieces helps should you not row on the same ergometer. For instance - I train at a 127 drag which is a 3 on my erg. However, when I go to practice at times I have to set the fan to a 7 just to get to a 127 - every erg is slightly different.
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Old 09-05-2005, 01:02 AM   #27
Chris Kemp
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Cheers Bruce, I have learned over time that the approach you describe - explosive pull and relaxed recovery - works best for me. Taking the stroke over 35 kills me quickly. In fact, in recent months I have been working on getting rate down further with a notional goal of 24 - 26 (round 28-29 now). Still and all, look forward to experimenting with the suggestions provided above to broaden the benefits I get from rowing.

Cheers, kempie.
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Old 09-05-2005, 02:40 AM   #28
Bruce Kocher
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Chris Wyant: I see your point regarding heavy vs light and fatigue. It's a balance to be sure. I had never concerned myself with drag factor between machines but your description makes good sense.

Sorry to hear about the mono. Back in the day, we worked under the assumption that mono was a 9-12 month recovery process. That was a few years ago and I'm sure your mileage will vary. Rowing is notorious for over-training. Between the asthma and mono it sounds like you've maybe been down that road a couple of times. Best of luck with your team and your training.

Chris Kemp: Cheers yourself. Have fun with the rowing. Lowering the rating but maintaining your pace is a proven way to improve. When your testing you'll probably want to find a slightly faster rating where you can maintain form and feel efficient. As Chris W sez keeping the fan load a little lighter for a quick pull may allow you to keep a high power output for longer. A lot will depend on your size. As a gross generalization heavier atheletes can pull a heavier load and are rewarded with a faster time. You'll want to experiment some to find your happy place, if there is such a thing on an ergometer.

Best regards,
Bruce
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Old 09-05-2005, 03:57 AM   #29
Chris Kemp
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Found a happy place on an erg after my first timed 1500m in a local gym contest. Time was pretty unimpressive but happy place was right beside the erg on the floor with my feet still in the straps.

On another note, what is mono? Have seen people mention it on the threads recently but have no idea what it is.

Cheers, kempie
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Old 09-05-2005, 06:01 AM   #30
Chris Forbis
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