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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 03-09-2003, 11:18 AM   #1
Geoff Sample
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I'm not clear on the distinction between the two. I imagine the press to handstand would start in an upright position, and incorporate changing body position to inverted by muscular force rather than jumping as in a handstand, then press? I also guess this would be most challenging on an unstable platform (read: rings)...

By the way - I thought I was quite strong at dips, using BW+90lbs for them in my old workouts, with good tempo and form. I read in one of the CrossFit Journals that ring dips were amusing to watch, and after trying them (and performing rather horribly), I'm now in on the joke (or am I the punchline?).
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Old 03-09-2003, 02:30 PM   #2
Patrick Johnston
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Geoff:

Don't feel bad at all. One of the problems with the way most people do dips is that they go down until their humerus is parallel to the ground. Coach has you do dips that require you to descend until your chest is even with your hands. When you do this on the rings, you are doing a really tough dip.
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Old 03-09-2003, 03:31 PM   #3
Geoff Sample
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Patrick - I've always been told that dipping low will damage your shoulders. Is this just a matter of flexibility (increasing range of motion so that one has strength in the deepest position)? This might esplain the trouble I've been having with those durn muscle-ups! BTW, If I've been doing worthless dips all this time, I don't find it "humerus" at all. :uhoh:
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Old 03-09-2003, 06:43 PM   #4
Patrick Johnston
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I believe that it is, indeed, a matter of flexibility. When you do the muscle-ups, you are forced to do an extremely deep dip. If you don't practice this, it will take a heck of a long time to get that muscle-up.
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Old 03-09-2003, 08:07 PM   #5
Tyler Hass
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For working up to a press to handstand, what do you guys think of this preparatory work (any exercises you might not know are listed at www.drillsandskills.com):
Planche-ball pushups on parallettes
Handstands
Handstand Pushups (against wall if necessary)
Press out of headstands with leg thrust

Also, does anyone have a picture or video of a press to handstand. I'm pretty sure I know what it is but not totally clear. I've seen it done where it goes from an L-sit, to a tuck, then legs kick up and back. However, some people bend their arms and do a handstand pushup. Others don't really bend their arms much and it looks like it would stress the abs more. I've done it the latter way, with a spotter, and it was very difficult.
It sounds like a great exercise either way.
Tyler
www.girevikmagazine.com
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Old 03-10-2003, 12:02 AM   #6
don
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Press to handstand: Set a pair of paralletes on the floor side by side. The paralletes should be spaced at a distance equal to the length from the tip of your middle fingle to the tip of your elbow. Stradle legs,bend over and grab parallets keeping you legs straight. From that position, suck in your abs, flex entire body as you straddle you feet outward. Your legs will travel in a semicircular motion upward until you reach a handstand. Practice against a wall until you get the hang of it. Believe me when I tell you that it's very difficult. Once you get that, try it without straddling your legs by assuming the piked position.
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Old 03-10-2003, 04:51 PM   #7
Roger Harrell
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First off a bent arm press handstand is almost not acceptable in gymnastics anymore, unless it's on rings and the body is kept straight. (no pike). The goal of the press handstand is to do it with straight arms.

When you are working a press handstand it is critical to lift your hips and keep yourself as piked as possible as long as possible. If you lift your legs (which most do to get to the handstand quickly) you will go through a planch position which is significantly harder than a regular press handstand.
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Old 03-11-2003, 03:02 PM   #8
Coach
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Roger,

Just curious, is what we used to call the "hollow back" press (straight body, straight leg, bent arm) absent from floor exercise and P-bars? Does it appear in youth routines? It's an outstanding strength/skill builder for athletes in general; I'd be sad to see it go.

We teach a progression from "bent everything", to "stiff-stiff" (straight arm, bent body, straight leg) , to "hollow back" (bent arm, straight body, straight leg) to "planche press" (straight everything).
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Old 03-11-2003, 03:53 PM   #9
Roger Harrell
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The hollow back press is still used. That's the straight body bent arm press on rings. You don't see it much on Ps anymore, but it's still done on floor sometimes. It's also a great drill for backuprise handstand on Ps. The key is to not rock into it. Then there are those that just slide forward from prone, lift to planch and press handstand. Now there is a real press.

I actually don't teach a bent everything press at all. It's either straight arm bent body, or bent arm straight body. In my experience working a bent arm straddle press develops poor technique and actually hinders the progress towards a straight arm press.
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Old 03-11-2003, 04:01 PM   #10
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I'm with you, Sir. We actually encourage straight arms for early handstands (pre-press). The bent arms seems to motivate a collapse in the newly initiated. I don't see any need for the bent arms. When I refer to bent everything usually the arms are nearly straight anyways.

I've always taught the hollowback on the ground with the rock initially and then bled it out over time.

Thanks, Roger.

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