CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Exercises
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-11-2005, 02:13 PM   #1
Woody Davis
Departed Woody Davis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 67
I know we discuss how to mix swimming with homemade WOD so here was mine today. Warm up with some L-holds and pullups. 10minutes running: ~2 minutes hard and then resting for 45sec to a minute. Immediately into the pool for about 10 minutes of hard swimming. Freestyle for a half lap at 90% and breast stroke at 90% on the way back. Rest a few seconds after each half lap. Breathing hard the whole time.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 02:15 PM   #2
Woody Davis
Departed Woody Davis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 67
Damn it. Forgot that warmup included some plyo jumps onto a bench. Some with normal knee bend and others from a full squat.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 06:41 PM   #3
Eugene R. Allen
Affiliate Eugene R. Allen is offline
 
Eugene R. Allen's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tacoma  Washington
Posts: 1,715
Woody - consider going the other way. Swimming is so demanding from a technique standpoint that you would be better off starting that fresh. Do the swimming first and then go out and hammer the runs. If the purpose of your runs is to up your lactate threshold it is too long. In fact rather than guess, you need to establish exactly what energy system you want to develop with your intervals so you can design the proper work/rest ratio. The "interval" is descriptive of the rest interval, not the work interval. How long your rest determines what kind of work you are doing.

Your breast stroke is a rest and is rough on your knees if you do it hard and don't have breast stroke knees. Consider staying with the crawl so you don't recover a bit with the breast stroke. Not to malign the breast stroke but unless you do it with really good form and very intense effort, you won't get as much out of it as you will the crawl.

Warm up in the pull with some easy swims, maybe with a pull buoy if you have one, do some hypoxic swims and then maybe some drill work if you want to improve your stroke...and who doesn't. Don't limit yourself to 50 yard/meter efforts. If you have a pace clock at your pool you need to use that to control your work efforts.

I have lots of swim workout info if you are interested.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 08:43 PM   #4
Joe Luckett
Departed Joe Luckett is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 49
Eugene,

I'd be interested in that swim info if it wouldn't be a bother. I generally swim once a week (avg. 2000m) using intermediate workouts I take from a book called The Fit Swimmer by Marianne Brems combined with drills from the Total Immersion Four Strokes DVD.

Thanks
-JW
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 09:54 PM   #5
Eugene R. Allen
Affiliate Eugene R. Allen is offline
 
Eugene R. Allen's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tacoma  Washington
Posts: 1,715
It won't be a bother at all...but give me till tomorrow or Monday. I have kids to get in the tub right now. Back soon.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 08:35 AM   #6
Woody Davis
Departed Woody Davis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 67
Thanks for the reply. I workout in my condo gym running on a treadmill (I hate it) and then hitting our pool. It might be tough for me to reverse the order unless I change out of my swim suit and dry off. I order the run swim in that manner so that I could go straight from the run, take of the shoes, and jump in the pool.

As for the energy system, I really just wanted to try the workout and then move from there. I know from the chart in "What is Fitness" CFJ that I didn't match the work/rest intervals of any of the prescribed pathways, but I was pressed for time and just wanted to get in the water and have an intense workout. Nonetheless, I thought it was a pretty good combo. I'd also be interested in your swimming information. Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 09:06 AM   #7
Eugene R. Allen
Affiliate Eugene R. Allen is offline
 
Eugene R. Allen's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tacoma  Washington
Posts: 1,715
Woody - First be sure you are using and following the Total Immersion program for you swimming skills. Master - or at least seek the three pillars of TI swimming:

Swim Balanced: This may be the first thing to try and fix because it is so important to fast, fish-like swimming. Your belly button may be near you center of gravity but your nipple line is your center of boyancy. You need to press the T (a line across your nipple line and another down your center) down into the water and get the feeling you are swimming downhill. Get your head into the water so that only a sliver of the top of your head is exposed. Don't lift your head to breathe - a common error-because this will drop your feet and create drag. You seek being slick and streamlined like a fish. Make the smallest hole through the water as possible.

Swim Long: Always have a hand out in front of you as you swim. A longer boat is a faster boat and that concept applies to the human form in the water as well. Don't take your next stroke until your other hand enters the water. Drill this with catch-up swimming.

Swim on your side: The water will always go around you, not under you. So you want to present the narrowest profile to the water as possible. In order to do this you want to spend as much time on your side as you can. When you take your stroke and pull with the hip you will wind up on your side with your armpit facing the bottom of the pool. Glide here...don't hurry to the next stroke.

Lots and lots of details to accomplish these three fundamentals. Make sure you work on them as part of each swimming workout. I devote 500 yards of every swim to skill drills.

One day a week swimming is not enough. You would be better off swimming 1,000 yards twice a week than 2,000 once a week. But of course more yards more often is even better. Here is what I do with my swim training 3x per week. Using this method I brought two of my SWAT buddies from a 2:15+ per 100 pace down to 1:30 for one of them and 1:40 for the other in less than 4 months. Now that pace is for just a few 100's but is still a marked improvement in speed.

Warm up: Pull with buoy for 500 to 1,000 paying particular attention to body roll, hand entry, glide and all the other subtle nuances of stroke perfection. We swim with a Finis Freestyle snorkle to help with paying attention to mechanics.

Hypoxic swims: We don fins and swim 20 under water lengths as fast as we can manage. I'm down to 11 something but Matt G is down to 9 to give you an idea of times. Great lung developer.

Drill: Next we put on Zoomers and do TI type drills such as no arms swim on side, one arm extended swim on side, super slow swim with 6 or 8 kicks between strokes, catch up, fist drill, zipper drill, finger drag drill...the total is 500 yards and we mix the drills up.

Main set: Lots of variety here with totals anywhere from 600 to 1,000 yards for the set. Here are a number of examples of main sets. If you do a set "On the minute" that means you send when the clock is on the top...at the 12, or in the case of a pace clock, on the 60. A pace clock is the way to go but your watch will work.

6 x 100 on the 2 minutes. Go hammer 4 laps sending on the top and whatever time you have left until 2 minutes elapses is your rest.

3 x 200 on 3:30, 100 on 2:00, 2 x 50 on 1:00. For this one do a 200 and send again at 3:30 for the 100. When 2:00 has elapsed send for your first 50 and after a minute send for your second 50 and then start over so that you do that whole thing 2 more times.

3 x (100, 2 x 50, 4 x 25). Swim a 100 on 2 minutes - or whatever your 100 time is that allows a 15 or 20 second rest...2 minutes is just very convienent on the clock - then do 2 50's on the minute and 4 25's on 30 seconds. Then do it 2 more times.

10 x 50 descending on the 1-5, 6-10. With this one you swim a total of 10 50's but you swim 1 through 5 at a slightly faster pace each time until you are going all out on the 5th one. Then slow down again for the 6th and descend once more to the 10th.

The point is to mix up your swims to keep things fun and interesting. As your times start to drop you will become more and more focused on your swims to drop them even more. Really try to get into the pool more than once a week, you will get far more improvement with multiple weekly trips to the pool.

Cool down: We end each swim with anywhere from 300 to 500 more yards of pulling with the buoy just to let what we did for the practice soak in...if you'll pardon the pun. A 3,000 yard workout takes us about 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 09:29 AM   #8
Brendan Melville
Member Brendan Melville is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Norwalk  CT
Posts: 454
That is awesome advice, once again Eugene. Reminds me to check out TI.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2005, 06:34 PM   #9
Joe Luckett
Departed Joe Luckett is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 49
Eugene,

Thanks for the workout ideas. Very similar to the stuff I do (but no fins-not allowed). Believe me, I would like nothing more than to swim more often. Swimming is the one thing I do well. Unfortunately, the local pool opens at 12 and closes at 7 p.m. That means I squeeze in Sunday, maybe Saturday, morning when they open at 10:30. It's just enough to keep my stroke tuned up, so I look at that as my active rest and recreation.

Brendan,
I super highly recommend TI. I really thought I had my freestyle dialed in, but doing their drills dropped my stroke per length from 23 to 18 after just a couple of sessions. If you can, get a book and DVD. The book explains in more detail what you are seeing on the DVD; all the stuff Eugene mentioned about swimming balanced, tall, and on your side. Roll baby roll.

JW
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2005, 09:39 AM   #10
Eugene R. Allen
Affiliate Eugene R. Allen is offline
 
Eugene R. Allen's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tacoma  Washington
Posts: 1,715
Another great swim workout this morning that I wanted to share because it was so exhausting and had CrossFit written all over it.

Warm up: Pull 500 yards with buoy.

Hypoxic: 500 as 20 individual lengths underwater with recovery at each end in 11:15.

Drill: 500 as 100 swim on side no arms, 100 swim on side arm extended, 100 alternating swim arm swim on side, 100 catch up, 100 fist.

Main set: 200 on 3:45 (3:15), 100 on 2:00 (1:32), 2 x 50 on 1:00 (:42, :45) - 100 on 2:00 (1:36), 2 x 50 on 1:00 (:46, :48), 2 x 25 on :30 (:18, :19) - 50 on 1:00 (:45), 2 x 25 on :30 (:19, :20). Whatever is left over from the actual swim time is your rest until your next send off time.

Cool Down: 250 pull

There's a 2,500 yard workout which was quite demanding and one that will pay dividends for your swim fitness.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Swim workout Dean W. Bryan Exercises 4 07-01-2007 11:42 PM
Swim Workouts Jason McCain Fitness 15 03-29-2007 10:32 AM
WOD for those who like to swim. Matt Thomas Workout of the Day 0 03-13-2006 06:09 PM
Do you swim? Kenneth Ritchie Community 13 05-13-2005 08:57 AM
Row/Swim WOD Woody Davis Exercises 12 05-02-2005 12:37 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:43 AM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.