CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Equipment
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Equipment Outfitting a serious gym. Vendors & suppliers. Devices & equipment

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-12-2007, 05:36 PM   #1
Mike Groth
Member Mike Groth is offline
 
Mike Groth's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 311
I wasn't sure if I should post this under equipment since it really isn't for crossfit. But I would really like to get into doing some triathlons and need some help with buying my first bike. I dont have a clue what I should be looking for. I will probably start out doing some sprints and would like to work my way up to an Olympic Tri.

Im not really sure what size I should be looking at, what extra equipment I would need on the bike, and what the differences are between a Road bike and a Tri specific bike. I dont really want to spend an arm and a leg on my first bike since Im a beginner, but what price range would I be looking at for a decent beginner bike? Should I go for a used bike or shop around on Ebay? It seems the the prices from online stores are cheaper than my local Trek store.

Thanks in advance for any info you guys can share w/ me.

Mike
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2007, 06:16 PM   #2
Jay Cohen
Member Jay Cohen is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sharpsville  PA
Posts: 3,384
Mike;
Visit either some local bike stores, talk to some local Tri athletes or at least visit Tri websites. You'll get very limited feedback here, that is not to say that there aren't some CF'rs that do Tri's, it's just that bike talk won't come up much. Now, if you're talking Rings, garage gyms, pull up bars, well, we go on for hours about that stuff.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2007, 06:25 PM   #3
David Wood
Departed David Wood is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
 
Posts: 3,303
. . . and your first instincts were correct . . . moving to "Equipment".
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2007, 07:28 PM   #4
Eugene R. Allen
Affiliate Eugene R. Allen is offline
 
Eugene R. Allen's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tacoma  Washington
Posts: 1,715
Mike - you can speed enormous amounts of money on bicycles (my Litespeed Vortex cost me around $7,000 with all the upgrades) but without question the single most important issue is fit. I'm 5' 11" tall with a 32" inseam and I ride a 56 cm bike, that's the frame size. The top tube length isn't adjustable but the stem is and you can tune the rise and extension of your handlebars with your stem. Do you want drops or cow horn bars? Do you want aerobars with shifters on the ends so you don't have to reach back to the STI shift levers to shift? What length do you want your crank arms, what is your fore and aft seat position, tubular or clincher wheels, spokes, disc in back, Zipp, Hed, Spinergy, carbon fiber, titanium, aluminum, steel...the list goes on and on.

Quintanna Roo and Cervelo make great bikes at just about every price break and I love the Cervelo P3. You can get the bike all tricked out and built up for triathlon or you can put it together yourself. Go to http://www.nytro.com/Tri_TT_Bikes_s/221.htm which is the Nytro web site. I think they still have a fly and ride program where you fly out there to California and they put you up in a hotel and fit you to your bike.

Fit - Fit - Fit...I can't stress that point enough you must be fit to your machine or it won't matter how good a bike it is. Do your research and figure out if you want the stiffness of aluminum, the lightness and vibration dampening of carbon fiber or the strength and compliance of titanium. They all have their strengths and there are reasons to prefer each. This is an important purchase and if you shop around you can get exactly what you want for a good price.

Road bikes have a fairly relaxed position in that they are in the 72 degree range in that the seat tube is angled back to the rear relative to the crank arms/bottom bracket. Tri bikes are steep and get closer to the vertical at 78 to 80 degrees which puts you in a more aggressive, forward leaning position which is where you want to be for TT riding. TT is time trial, you against the clock and that's what triathletes do during the bike portion of the race. No drafting. You can put clip on aero bars on regular drop handle bars with STI shifters (shifters in the brake levers) or put them in the bar ends so you can shift while your hands on on the aero bars.

You will need clipless pedals and will have to choose between Shimano SPD, Look, Time and others but I use a brand called Speedplay that I really like. Then there's bike shoes, helmets, gloves, bike shorts and jerseys, racing suits, swimming wetsuits, goggles, transition bags and gear, bike racks for your car...there's a lot of stuff to get for triathlon and I have had 15 years of racing time to gather just about every variant of every thing there is to get.

Yes, start with sprints and do 3 or 4 before you move up to Olympic. They are great fun and a terrific challenge...but beware of the swim start. If you are not comfortable with the idea of an elephant stampede in the water...consider starting on the edges of the mass of humanity that is in the water.

I am blathering. I have a bit of experience in this area and would be most happy to get you going. Check out the Nytro website and see if you develop any bike preferences. Go ride some bikes if you can and see if you want a road bike or a tri bike geometry on your ride. How much do you want to spend on your bike? If you can do around $1,500 you can get a pretty good steed and it will last you for years. I don't suggest that you buy junk just to see if you like it. If you want to just stick a toe in the water go borrow a bike. Don't buy crap.

Ask whatever specific stuff you want so I don't just wander aimlessly.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2007, 09:42 AM   #5
Mike Gray
Member Mike Gray is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Zurich  ZH
Posts: 306
That next-to-last tip was particularly good:

"Go borrow a bike."

(Not that all the stuff before wasn't great, not to mention the superb final imperative, "Don't buy crap.")

But back to borrowing - or begging - or stealing - or renting - or whatever: Get a chance to try several bikes before you buy.

We don't own a car as a four person family, but have spent more on our bikes over the years than some people do on a (reasonably inexpensive) car. I still remeber the first time I sat on my current bike (1998 Stumpjumper - the only original part still on it is the seat post clamp) - it just *fit.* No bike had ever felt that good before. Hasn't since, either.

I've also learned three golden rules of bikes and money:

1) A good one is worth every penny it costs.
2) Good doesn't mean expensive - paricularly if expensive doesn't fit well.
3) Being cheap doesn't save money, either.

About (3): if you ride a cheap bike hard, it'll turn into the kind of thing that'll put your BSG's kids through college, especially if you do don't do your own wrench work.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2007, 12:23 PM   #6
Mike Groth
Member Mike Groth is offline
 
Mike Groth's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 311
Eugene, since this is going to be my only bike should I get a road bike and put aero bars on it or get a TT/Tri bike? The bike I get will be the one I train on as well as use in competition.

I went to a bike shop here in San Diego and took a couple bikes out for a test ride. The guy at the shop recommended getting a road bike and fitting it w/ aero bars. He said I should do this because "road bikes are better for climbing and cornering where TT bikes are only good for going fast in a straight line."

Im going to go to the Nytro store this weekend and take a look at what they have and get some more info.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2007, 03:00 PM   #7
Eugene R. Allen
Affiliate Eugene R. Allen is offline
 
Eugene R. Allen's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tacoma  Washington
Posts: 1,715
Cool - you get to shop at Nytro. If they are in the same store I visited, you'll be surprised how small they are considering their world acclaim and extensive support of pro racers.

Nytro will provide you the best advice available in cycling and will be able to get you onto the ride that will best suit your needs. There are camps on both sides of this issue that will argue very strongly for road bike set up for TT since you can use it for regular riding and those that are convinced that the geometry of a road bike is all wrong for aero positioning. If you find a Softride you can get the best of both worlds by being able to adjust your seat angle dramatically and the Softride is amazingly comfortable. If you have a stiff lower back you might find the steep aero position of a P3 or other TT bike as uncomfortable and the forward position totally wrong for climbing. Whichever you do you will compromise something. A pure TT bike is faster for flat courses against the clock and a road geometry is better suited for climbing. You have to make the call here and decide how you will be spending the majority of your riding time. If you are comfortable (for miles and miles) in an aero position, go that route and you will be faster. If you get your forearms on the pads and your back screams and you fall over...get a road machine. Have this conversation with the bike gurus at Nytro and they will set you up right.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 12:10 PM   #8
Richard Ferron
Member Richard Ferron is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Quebec  Quebec
Posts: 10
Mike,

I've been in the same situation a couple of years ago and here are my recommandation :

1- Since you don't have a bike, buy a ROAD bike. A tri bike is not versatile enough. For instance, you wont be allowed in group rides with a tri bike.

2- Look a the local racing teams. Some have sponsors and change their bike every year. They take care of them and usually sell them for less than half the price. Ask the guy to change some used parts on it before (chain for exemple), it cost him nothing.

3- Fit is indeed really important. but most of the shop dont really know how to do this... I've been fitted in Detroit and I live in Quebec city.

Like you I was hesitating between a road and a tri bike and finally bought a used road bike from a racer. It's been a great decision. I don't race that much but I ride a lot and love group rides so in the end, that was the only possibility. To this day, I've done a couple of Ironman on that road bike (with handle bars) with complete satisfaction. I still think that if I had bought a tri bike I would've end up buying a second, road, bike.

Finally, a great source of information and motivation is the forum of www.slowtwitch.com

hope that helps

Richard
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 10:38 AM   #9
Roberto Dowse
Member Roberto Dowse is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Golden  CO
Posts: 40
Mike

as this site has the best info for CrossFit (and GPP) Slowtwitch.com has tons of info on all things tri. Do a search over there for tri vs road bike etc and you will be innundated with replies
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Renting a bike for a triathlon Cassi Nesmith Equipment 5 03-04-2007 03:28 AM
CF and Triathlon Brian Mansfield Fitness 12 11-08-2006 05:58 AM
Training on a stationary bike questions Josh Goldsmith Exercises 14 04-21-2006 06:23 PM
Triathlon Jeff Griffin Fitness 7 04-18-2006 04:04 AM
First Triathlon... Karl Steadman Community 20 09-03-2005 11:20 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.