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Old 12-05-2007, 11:47 AM   #1
Alex Reynolds
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Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

Hey all, I am totally fascinated with this show. It really engrosses me. I think the crossfit mentality can be related to what these people do- push to the limit.

I was wondering if anyone knew of how these brave souls train to climb everest. They have to be in really good shape. Don't they??

Also just any input on the show is welcomed also (I know this isn't the forum for it, but I'm more interested in the fitness level)
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Old 12-05-2007, 01:13 PM   #2
Greg Light
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

You should definitely check out the book call "Into Thin Air" by Jon Krakauer. It is a first person account of the disaster on Everest in 1996 where a bunch of people died. Great read. I tore though it in 2 days.
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Old 12-05-2007, 01:27 PM   #3
Emily Mattes
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

I was about to second Greg's recommendation. Perhaps it is different than it was when Krakauer wrote about it, but it sounds like all you needed to do to get onto Everest was have a big enough bank account to pay a guide. Actually summiting, that's a different story.

When it comes to doing something as obviously risky as climbing Everest, I am torn between applauding the courage of the climbers and booing their lack of consideration for the very real risks the mountains hold. If you have a family, heck, if you have any loved ones, you do them a great disservice by obviously risking your life in that manner--I think the death rate is somewhere between 3%-8%, low, but when you consider that other supposedly "high risk" activities like skydiving have a death rate of 1/100,000 in the US it changes perspective.
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Old 12-05-2007, 02:01 PM   #4
Susie Rosenberg
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

From www.alpineascents.com (wfs):

Alpine Ascents International is generally considered America’s premier Everest Guide Service. Our combination of veteran of guides and Sherpa with summit experience, quantity of oxygen, and years of logistical expertise is simply unmatched. We are particularly proud of our extraordinary success during the past six years (97 climbers summited) and we strive for similar accomplishments in 2008. This season we look to have our same leaders as in past years, including Vernon Tejas, Lakpa Rita Sherpa and Dave Morton who are not only renowned mountaineers, but are also recognized for their ability to assist qualified climbers to the summit. Alpine Ascents currently holds the guided ascent record for Mount Everest.

Susie
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Old 12-05-2007, 02:21 PM   #5
Christian Mason
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

As a climber, I had trouble not getting angry watching this show.

I am by no means an accomplished alpinist. By any kind of real standard I am a beginner, but the majority of the people seen on this show are not climbers at all - they are closer to alpine tourists. That's fine, I don't fault them as long as they are honest with themselves about what they are doing. I also don't have any issue with the guides and their enabling people to have experiences that are very personally significant to them.

But I do find it disturbing that the image "Joe Sixpack" gets of climbing is going to be based on this kind of circus.

Suggestion:
Watch "Touching The Void".
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:16 PM   #6
Jack Gayton
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

I agree w/ Greg.. I actually just finished "Into Thin Air" by Jon Krakauer on audio book (I have a long commute). I liked it so much, I went back to the library, renewed it and listened again. I liked it better the second time through. Amazing what people will push themselves to do.

Well worth the read. Krakauer has another book "Into The Wild". About the college kid who walked into the Alaska wild and never came out. Different than "Into Thin Air" but interesting.
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Old 12-06-2007, 01:00 PM   #7
Xavier Iturriagagoitia
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Light View Post
You should definitely check out the book call "Into Thin Air" by Jon Krakauer. It is a first person account of the disaster on Everest in 1996 where a bunch of people died. Great read. I tore though it in 2 days.
Note that in that book Anatoli Boukreev is being described as the one who's responsible (I haven't read Into Thin Air but I've been told this is so)
I would recommend "The Climb" by Boukreev
It's about the same events but another person telling it
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Old 12-06-2007, 02:27 PM   #8
Jeremy Mathers
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xavier Iturriagagoitia View Post
Note that in that book Anatoli Boukreev is being described as the one who's responsible (I haven't read Into Thin Air but I've been told this is so)
I would recommend "The Climb" by Boukreev
It's about the same events but another person telling it
I have read both, I recommend them both as well. Anatoli (and the Mountain Madness expedition) are criticized quite a bit in "into Thin Air". "The Climb" responds to a lot of that criticism, I am guessing the truth is somewhere in between the two accounts.

About the show, I'm sure the level of training for the clients ("tourists") is significantly lower than the professional climbers that make the trip.

Here's a really interesting article about Christian Stangl who climbed Everest (from the north side, the same side they climbed in season 1, i haven't seen season 2 yet) http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=7956

He completes the entire climb in 22 hours ( 16 up, 6 down) from Advanced Base Camp. He did it all without oxygen. This was in 2006
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Old 12-06-2007, 03:25 PM   #9
David Aguasca
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Re: Everest: Beyond the Limit TV show

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily Mattes View Post
I was about to second Greg's recommendation. Perhaps it is different than it was when Krakauer wrote about it, but it sounds like all you needed to do to get onto Everest was have a big enough bank account to pay a guide. Actually summiting, that's a different story.

When it comes to doing something as obviously risky as climbing Everest, I am torn between applauding the courage of the climbers and booing their lack of consideration for the very real risks the mountains hold. If you have a family, heck, if you have any loved ones, you do them a great disservice by obviously risking your life in that manner--I think the death rate is somewhere between 3%-8%, low, but when you consider that other supposedly "high risk" activities like skydiving have a death rate of 1/100,000 in the US it changes perspective.
one of the guys i climb with, an older guy, is a guide and long-time rock and ice climber. he summed up the attitude of the high altitude alpinist as being that of the Samurai: you go into battle ready to die. yeah, it's a bit melodramatic, and can be viewed as selfish, but i admire their drive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian Mason View Post
As a climber, I had trouble not getting angry watching this show.

I am by no means an accomplished alpinist. By any kind of real standard I am a beginner, but the majority of the people seen on this show are not climbers at all - they are closer to alpine tourists. That's fine, I don't fault them as long as they are honest with themselves about what they are doing. I also don't have any issue with the guides and their enabling people to have experiences that are very personally significant to them.

But I do find it disturbing that the image "Joe Sixpack" gets of climbing is going to be based on this kind of circus.

Suggestion:
Watch "Touching The Void".

the reason christian cites is sorta why i've avoided the show...seeing how sensationalist reality TV shows recently have become, i knew that i'd just be upset by it. if you enjoy watching it, that's great, but understand that it's not an accurate representation of climbing/alpinist culture.
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