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Old 07-27-2011, 01:59 PM   #141
Jason R O'Dell
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Vickie Ellickson View Post
Good questions. I fully admit that I had no idea what I was doing at the time with except for running. Before learning about Crossfit, I had no idea what an olympic lift was, why someone would want to jump on a box nor the first clue as to what a non-gymnist could do with rings.

What I appreciate the most about Crossfit is the exposure to the wide-ranging skills AND intelligently programmed metcons (and pure lifts) that utilize those skills. I might have stumbled across those skills individually, but wouldn't have had the first clue as to how they could be blended together to make effective, challenging and fun workouts.

Is it the be all and end all of fitness in my life? No. Has it gotten me results that exceed anything else I've tried? Definitely. There may be other "systems" in which I could find success, but no one will be able to convince me that Crossfit is dangerous, ineffective, inefficient nor elitist.
Are you sure we are talking about the same program?

So nobody will be able to convince you despite the evidence in the injury forum slapping you in the face? That's the sad evidence I can't think for myself for you right there folks! Throw on your blinders, plug your ears and go "Nyayayayayaya"
 
Old 07-27-2011, 02:00 PM   #142
Vickie Ellickson
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Jason R O'Dell View Post
No it's not. It's a different world than professional sports and not nearly as dangerous. The pace is completely different, the people you're playing against are completely different and so on. There's less risk of injury there. But ya know, I can probably say whatever I want but since you have imbibed the kool-aid it'll probably fall on deaf ears.
There's less risk of injury in rec sports than professional sports, agreed. However, people still get hurt (badly) at the rec level. I know plenty of folks who have blown ACL's, broken bones, etc., etc. Doesn't matter the nature of the physical activity.

I think we can agree that a) most people that do Crossfit aren't considered elite athletes and b) most people that do sports don't do so professionally. ALL of them are at risk for injury.
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Old 07-27-2011, 02:02 PM   #143
Vickie Ellickson
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Jason R O'Dell View Post
Are you sure we are talking about the same program?

So nobody will be able to convince you despite the evidence in the injury forum slapping you in the face? That's Cult-Fit Kool-Aid for you right there folks! Throw on your blinders, plug your ears and go "Nyayayayayaya"
I invite you to check out forums for other activities like tennis, soccer, frisbee, etc. ALL physical activities beget injuries.
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Old 07-27-2011, 02:03 PM   #144
Emily Mattes
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Jim Denofa View Post
http://www.youtube.com/user/fattymacfatso?feature=mhee YOU MUST ANNOTATE ALL LINKS WHETHER WORK AND FAMILY SAFE.
This is telling me nothing about your squat, bench, deadlift, C&J, snatch, log press, stone loading before and after Crossfit . . . It tells me nothing about your programming before and after Crossfit or how long you've been training. How were you placing in meets and SM contests before and after Crossfit? Your training has benefited from the addition of long metcons and randomization? How has high-rep Olympic lifting improved your technique? I'm asking about the specific, numerical benefits Crossfit has brought to your athletic performance.

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Originally Posted by Vickie Ellickson View Post
I invite you to check out forums for other activities like tennis, soccer, frisbee, etc. ALL physical activities beget injuries.
Life-threatening injuries like rhabdo and compartment syndrome?
 
Old 07-27-2011, 02:37 PM   #145
Paulo Santos
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Justin Z. Smith View Post
Well that is great (serious, I'm not being sarcastic here at all)! The issue is that yes, it does or can work in that way. But, are you "elite" because of it? The claims made (I'm not saying made by you, but in general) are elite fitness, beating other athletes, and so forth.

Justin
LOL. Thank you for your kind words, but I am not elite and I'm not trying to be. I personally separate CrossFit into two sections. CrossFit and the CrossFit Games (I don't consider CrossFit games a Sport and never will be in my mind). I have no plans on competing, but I do like to watch the competitors compete.

I think part of the problem with CrossFit may be related to the marketing. Some people think CrossFit is overhyped with the way they throw the word ELITE around and I understand that. At the same time I understand that it is just marketing. In my field (LE), I see a bunch of gimmicky products and videos on YouTube of companies overhyping their gear all the time and it is a turnoff at times, but at the same time, I understand where they are coming from. They are trying to sell their product and at the same time, they are proud of their product, so at times they can be over the top, exactly like CrossFit HQ.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 02:57 PM   #146
Vickie Ellickson
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Emily Mattes View Post
Life-threatening injuries like rhabdo and compartment syndrome?
I'm assuming that your implication is that someone who does Crossfit to improve their fitness is more likely to experience injuries (specifically life-threatening injuries) than people who don't.

I don't buy it. You have to go pretty far outside the intended bounds of the program and individual limitations to put yourself in that much danger.

I ride a motorcycle, which is fun but risky. If I'm a ******* and drive 100mph down the freeway whilst weaving in and out of traffic and popping wheelies, I've overstepped my limitations and the intended boundaries of the activity. If I get into a wreck while doing that, it's not the motorcycle manufacturer's fault. It's all on me.

I've stayed in the intended boundaries for quite a few years now and haven't had a wreck. Accidents can happen (just like they can w/ people who drive cars instead of a motorcycles), but the user has a big influence on the level of risk that they assume.
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Old 07-27-2011, 02:58 PM   #147
Jamie Gowens
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Tamara Cohen View Post
I feel the same way.

And, I recognize that in the end it's her body and her decision, and she's the only one who can decide if the reward was "big" enough.

But, it's also CrossFit's decision to glorify it, and that's what made me sick to my stomach about the whole situation.
This x a bagillionty.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 03:01 PM   #148
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Vickie Ellickson View Post
There's less risk of injury in rec sports than professional sports, agreed. However, people still get hurt (badly) at the rec level. I know plenty of folks who have blown ACL's, broken bones, etc., etc. Doesn't matter the nature of the physical activity.
I'm writing this from Aspen, Colorado, where the hospitals hire extra orthopedists to work in the ER for ski season. I would bet that most of the people who come to Aspen to ski are *not* professionals.

More generally, professionals probably have lower injury risks *per hour of training* than recreational athletes. Yes, they go much harder, but they've built up both their skill level and their fitness to be able to handle it. No professional wants to get injured, so it's not a risk most are likely to run if they don't need to.

Crossfit is sort of a different situation, though. The whole point -- unless Crossfit is your sport -- is to become more fit. *Any* injury is a setback relative to that goal. So a better comparison would be between Crossfit and other fitness programs, not between Crossfit and recreational or professional sports.

Katherine
 
Old 07-27-2011, 03:05 PM   #149
Jamie Gowens
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Michael Capalbo View Post
Well I'd say the key here is "you are injuring yourself". You. Your decision. You can make it a point to scale or even not finish a workout.

Now some people don't. The same peer pressure that pushes a lot of us much harder than we could push ourselves (and helps us get amazing results), is the same peer pressure that won't let us lighten up when we really need to. Also, some of us are too hell-bent to stop. I pulled my groin this winter lifting *before* class. In this ill-fated lifting session, I severely aggravated an injury (that I got lifting a week before **at a globo**). I didn't heed my body's signals that it was still hurting from the week before and that I needed to stop, and I paid the price.

But there are a lot of people in CF who do scale and back down and who don't get injured.
I'm only going to point out that many boxes have cultures where a member feels shamed, bad, or a 'disappointment' for quitting a WOD, regardless of the reason. The HardenThe****UP mentality is becoming quite prevalent, and as a result, people who would normally have better sense are doing some pretty stupid things.

Yay peer pressure.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 03:06 PM   #150
Matt Harris
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Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

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Originally Posted by Andrew Bell View Post
Fixed that for you.

Fact is that 90% of people who do cf DON'T in fact know when to scale, or stop and rest, or end the workout. Perfect example is RIGHT HERE. (wfs)
There's a point someone other than the athlete needs to take responsibility and throw in the towel. A doctor on hand, with the authority to stop the competition if he determines an athlete may damage him(or her)self, seems like a pretty good idea for CF competitions.
 
 


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