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Old 07-31-2004, 02:57 PM   #1
Aptdwler
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First 100 at a 1:32 pace felt good, 39 strokes/minute, pulse 76% max. Second 100 feeling good, pule 89% max, pace 134. Third 100 pulse 91% max. Still feeling OK, but breathing heavy. Third 100 feeling good pace 136 pulse 91% max. Fourth 100 REALLY starting to feel it, cardio is taxed, muscles feel fine, pace 142. Fifth 100, near cardio collapse, respirations out of control….loosing it….have to finish….didn’t come this far for nothing! Nearly vomit as the last stroke is pulled, pace 1:44.5 for last 100. I lay elbow on knees for a few seconds, lacking the energy or motivation to unattache my feet!

Finished in 1:37:8, muscular system wasn’t really taxed, though noticed it more in the upper than lower body. Respiratory system collapsed. I know I wouldn’t have made it another 100!

A success, my goal was sub 1:40. The last 100 was tough. Reminds me of 1 minute hill sprints, only worse. The pulse was slightly less than I’ve had hill sprinting. Damper setting was 6. I’m not sure of my next goal. I usually bulk up in the fall and I’m not sure how this will affect rowing. My goal for spring of next year is sub 1:30…
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Old 07-31-2004, 03:35 PM   #2
Robert Wolf
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I'm by no means a rowing expert bu I think focusing on harder pulls and more along 25 cycles per minute may yield even better results. Experts?

A major factor in rowing is body weight so an increase in wieght will likely bring the time down further,
Robb
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Old 07-31-2004, 05:45 PM   #3
Ross Hunt
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Robb,

I'm no expert, but in my experience as a crewbie, for a distance as short as 500 meters rating it up as high as possible is definetely the way to go. Everyone from the coxswain to the big engine room guys seems to be able to drop their split by increasing the rate.
This is assuming, of course, that all the strokes are still quality (full length).

Aptdwler - Good stuff. A friendly word of advice, though; if your upper body hurts more than your lower body, check your form: As my calisthenics WOD times will testify, my upper-body muscular endurance is lacking, but my lower body is always far more fatigued during a good row. Concept2.com is a good place to start.

Ross Hunt
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Old 08-01-2004, 10:25 AM   #4
David Wood
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Pukie lives somewhere between your "hard, fast" 500m row and 10 seconds faster.

For me, that's between 1:48 (hard, fast) and 1:38 (pukie). It's amazing how much pain and nausea lies in those 10 seconds.

I usually pull at about 29 - 30 strokes / minute. I've tried lowering it to 25 (bigger pulls) . . . makes the first 300 easier, but the last 200 are still pain. I can't go faster without compromising stroke length (and therefore time).
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Old 08-02-2004, 10:05 AM   #5
Ron Nelson
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Just by coincidence I pulled a 1000k warm up on Sat for the WOD. I found, at least on the C2, that harder longer pulls decreased my time better than shorter, faster pulls. Finished my 1000 in 4:09. A PR for me. I want to get to sub 4 min 1000's and sub 1:50 500's on a regular basis. A 1:30 500? I might lose my gym membership after having Pukie visit at the end of the row.
Ross, my forearms tend to hurt more during high exertion. Am I not using enough hips/legs in my pulls?
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Old 08-02-2004, 01:49 PM   #6
Aptdwler
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I watched video of my 500 this afternoon. I guess I actually my have underestimated the amount of suffering involved! My technique looked good. The first 4-5 strokes, arm pull was a little early, but after that, as far as I could tell it looked good.

I think my feeling it more in the upperbody may have been an exageration. I'm not use to feeling it at all there, at least not since I use to swim a lot. Most other cardio I've done is lower body dominate. Also an interesting link on cardio, I think in Sun workout of the day...

Feeling it the forearms could be because you are bending at the wrist, thus using a lot of forearm muscle in the finish of the stoke. I was doing it w/o realizing it, until I taped myself a while back. Really recommend recording yourself. I caught several errors early...

Sub 1:30 or burst! Or both?
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Old 08-02-2004, 03:51 PM   #7
Ross Hunt
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Ron,

I'm no rowing expert, but I'd guess that your problem is overgripping the handle when you really go for it. This is a common error in rowing; it takes most novice rowers a season or two to fully correct it, and it still rears its head sometimes when you're pulling hard in choppy water. In endurance sport, gripping hard on the pull is counterproductive; you can, to a certain extent, differentiate between novice rowers and more experienced rowers by the blisters on the formers' hands from overgripping the oar handle.

On leg drive: I try to make the leg drive power the finish totally. The leg drive is everything; the action of the spinal erectors is basically an afterthought to the leg drive; when I pull the handle to my chest with my lats and forearms, my goal is not to pull hard, but to pull the handle to my chest so quickly that it bounces off the top of my abs and leads me into the recovery. My forearms never feel tired after rows.

A note about this, though: I learned how to row to train for on-water rowing, where the elements of technique I've just described are essential for boat run and set; I've heard of and seen people who are much, much better ergometer rowers than me pull the handle to their chin and jerk themselves wildly up the slide on the recovery! It's not for me, but it wins comps for some people.
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Old 08-02-2004, 03:54 PM   #8
Ross Hunt
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Ron,

Looking over what I just posted, I realize that I should have given you more practical advice for forearm relaxation. Here it is: On the drive, you should not have to wrap your thumb or your palm around the handle; you should be able to just pull it with your fingers. On the recovery, many wiggle or drum their finger to remind themselves to keep a light grip.

Hope that helps,

Ross Hunt
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Old 08-02-2004, 05:12 PM   #9
Ron Nelson
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Ross,
Thanks for the advice. I'll certainly put it to use next time I row, which will be soon as I'm a big fan of the C2. I did the "Fight Gone Bad" today as a WOD and used the advice from before your post on going strong on the pulls. I noticed more fatigue in the legs and hips and less in the forearms (actually, none in the forearms). It's funny, because now that I think of it, I concentrated on using my legs to get a good strong pull, focused my breathing so intake occurred on the return stroke, utilized the posteior chain for maximum extention, and must have relaxed my grip totally by coincidence!!
Again thanks! One day I'll try rowing on the water.
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Old 08-02-2004, 05:15 PM   #10
Ron Nelson
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BTW, Aptdwlr, Try the Fight Gone Bad. Go all out for one minute in the row at the end of each round. I found I got stronger as the rounds progressed. Good strong pulls got me a projected 1:39-1:41 500m time. No Pukie, but I did meet his cousin, Acid-Refluxie!
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