CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-27-2004, 08:07 AM   #1
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Anyone have an idea of the minimum amount of protein an athlete needs to maintain strength, given the fact the individual has kidney disease and has been advised to moderate protein levels in his/her diet?

Athletes who regularly engage in strength training typically bump up their protein intake quite a bit (as do I), but I wonder how much of this is absolutely necessary to stay off a decline in performance. Is there is a dietary protein level where a favorable biochemical situation in the body can be reached, to supply ample aminos for the muscles, without taxing a compromised kindey.

Thanks all.

B

  Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2004, 04:48 PM   #2
Kevin Roddy
Member Kevin Roddy is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Harrison TWP  Michigan
Posts: 769
There is absolutely no research to show that high protein intake can harm the kidneys.


However, there's not a ton of evidence to show that bumping your intake to anything above 1-1.3 grams per pound of bodyweight will have a huge effect, unless you do steroids.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2004, 06:42 PM   #3
Brian Hand
Departed Brian Hand is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 633
Kevin, not so. High protein diets have been shown to place excessive strain on the kidneys of people with pre-existing kidney problems.

With that said, I think the minimum amount would depend on a number of other factors. For example, if alternate sources of energy are always available, it is not likely protein will be oxidized for energy. The quality of the protein is obviously a biggie - I'd avoid incomplete / low quality proteins if I was trying to spare my kidneys. I'd also try to spread it out as evenly as possible through the day.

Despite the benefits of a high protein diet for athletes, I'll bet we all know great athletes who probably don't get much over the RDA. I know lots of guys who do okay on 1g protein per kg bodyweight; I would try that as a minimum if the kidneys will tolerate it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2004, 08:01 PM   #4
Kevin Roddy
Member Kevin Roddy is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Harrison TWP  Michigan
Posts: 769
Woop, sorry. That is true. My bad.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2004, 10:44 PM   #5
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Thanks for the input fellows. The recent news sent me into a bit of depression. Spent so much time getting into shape, and following Crossfit suggestions, it's a bummer when mother nature decides to work against it all. I will simply have to adapt. :-)




  Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2004, 04:20 AM   #6
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
Brad, sorry to hear about this, I think you will do great with Brian's suggestion. I believe the large loads of PRO are more geared towards hypertrophy type training rather then athletic training. Experiment and keep us updated.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2004, 05:51 AM   #7
Barry Cooper
Member Barry Cooper is offline
 
Barry Cooper's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisville  KY
Posts: 2,188
Brad,

I'm 225-230 (depending on the week), and I rarely get more than 100-120 grams a day. I've done fine for years on that. I'm not a great powerlifter, but I'm not awful either. It's entirely possible I would do better on more protein, but whenever I've tried it I just blimp up. I don't know why. I try to keep the Zone ratios in all my meals.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2004, 10:21 AM   #8
Ryan Atkins
Member Ryan Atkins is offline
 
Ryan Atkins's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Racine  WI
Posts: 925
Brad,

Sorry to hear about the bad news. If it helps any, I'll second what Brian said (regarding great athletes with low protein intake). I think the protein requirements as outlined by Team Quest are low by Zone standards (something like 10 or 20%). However, Randy Couture and other TQ members look like their in pretty good shape to me.

Hope this helps,

Ryan
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2004, 07:48 AM   #9
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Thanks again, I appreciate your help very much. :-)

Brad
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2004, 08:12 PM   #10
John McCracken
Member John McCracken is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Canton  Michigan
Posts: 152
Brad,

The "standard renal diet" is 2gm Na+, 2gm K+, 60gm protein. Often, Calcium supplementation is needed and Phosphorus consumption should be limited.

The following are selected excerpts from The Chronic Kidney Disease and Pre-ESRD Management in the Primary Care Setting:

"In patients with early or moderate kidney insufficiency, daily energy intake should be 35 kcal/kg body weight and daily protein intake should be 0.8 g/kg body weight. For patients with more severe kidney insufficiency or nephrotic syndrome, severe protein restriction in conjunction with a dietary supplement may be useful to prevent symptoms and reduce proteinuria."

"Protein restriction is indicated in every symptomatic patient with kidney failure. Protein restriction is the mainstay of dietary treatment, because almost all of the signs and symptoms are caused by retention of the products of protein catabolism. Yet protein malnutrition is a common and ominous complication of kidney insufficiency. Although it is commonly assumed that protein malnutrition is best avoided by encouraging greater protein intake, this advice may be counterproductive. The associated increase in signs and symptoms (especially anorexia) may reduce caloric intake and aggravate malnutrition. If intake of essential amino acids (abundant in high quality protein and also available as tablets) as well as calories is adequate, protein malnutrition will not develop and, if present, may be corrected (Walser, 2000)."

"Protein restriction appears to slow the progression of kidney insufficiency and decrease symptoms and signs of kidney insufficiency. Furthermore, some deferral of dialysis is achieved simply by reduction of symptoms and the severity of azotemia at any given level of kidney function."

"The benefit of a low protein diet in slowing progression is controversial. Clinical trials suggest that dietary protein restriction may slow the progression of kidney disease."

"A low protein diet (0.6 g/kg) without supplements may be less effective than a very low protein diet (0.3 g/kg) supplemented by essential amino acid (or ketoacid) tablets, 10 g/day in divided doses with meals (Di Landro, 1990), but raises additional problems of compliance and cost."

"Protein restriction also reduces proteinuria. In nephrotic patients, a progressive fall in proteinuria and rise in serum albumin may occur over several months, especially if CKI is not severe (Walser et al., 1996). This response was seen to a very low protein diet (0.3 g/kg) supplemented by essential amino acids (10-20 g/day in divided doses with meals), but not to a conventional low protein diet (0.6 g/kg)."

Here is some nutrition resources:

Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease

The Nephron Information Center - Nutrition Resources

Here is some additional resources:

Chronic Kidney Disease and Pre-ESRD Management in the Primary Care Setting

National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse

National Kidney Disease Education Program

Primary Care Physician Targets for Chronic Kidney Disease

National Kidney Foundation

"History has demonstrated that the most notable winners usually encountered heartbreaking obstacles before they triumphed. They won because they refused to become discouraged by their defeats." -- B. C. Forbes

"When we long for life without difficulties, remind us that oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure." -- Peter Marshall
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need advice on kidney problem Veronica Carpenter Injuries 6 08-03-2007 12:01 PM
Gallstones & kidney stones Bob Pratt Injuries 9 06-08-2007 12:33 PM
Carb consumption linked to kidney cancer Kenneth Urakawa Community 3 10-30-2006 09:59 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:26 AM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.