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Old 03-11-2006, 04:28 PM   #1
Steve Liberati
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Thyroid problems commonly go undetected...find out if you are a victim?

The BBT is a highly sensitive and accurate measure of low thyroid function, perhaps exceeding the reliability of available blood tests. The late Broda Barnes, MD., a pioneer in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disorders, developed this test and successfully diagnosed and treated many patients from it.

The BBT test was developed as a simple measure of detecting hypothyroid conditions. It is based on the observation that hypothyroid patients typically run lower than normal body temperatures.

This makes sense, since body temperature (heat output) is a direct measure of the amount of fuel (food and oxygen) being burned by the cells.

In terms of the most accurate measurement of the thyroid function--that is, determining the ability of thyroxin to enter the cells and influence metabolism--the BBT test is the most logical assessment tool. The BBT should be taken immediately upon awakening.

To check your basal body temp, follow these simple steps:

1. Keep a thermometer by your bedside so you can take your temperature before getting out of bed in the morning. (It is important to move as little as possible while taking your temp.)
2. Shake down the thermometer to read less than 92.0 deg (unless you have a digital, which I recommend.)
3. Upon awakening, take your auxiliary (armpit) temp for at least ten minutes.
4. Record your temp.

Repeat these steps for four days. (Menstruating women should record their temp on the second, third, fourth, and fifth days of their periods.) Calculate your average temp for four days. A normal metabolic rate will produce a waking temp of between 97.8 and 98.2 deg F. Temp below 97.8 may indicate, at the very least, subclinical hypothyroidism. Temperatures higher than 98.6 may reflect hyperthyroidism.


(Message edited by steve_liberati on March 11, 2006)
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Old 03-11-2006, 05:11 PM   #2
Daniel Miller
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Steve, and anyone who can benefit from this;
I have no thyroid.
Audacity aside, you see, one year ago this week I had a thyroidectomy after being diagnosed with thyroid cancer with extensive pulmonary and lymphatic metastasis.
The surgery was a success but I'm still receiving a very mild and low-side effect radiation treatments. (around 5cc of Iodine 131 every 4-6months)
I hope not to make too long of a story here but I'd be happy to answer any questions about being hypothyroid and how easy it is to ignore. You see, with the level of metastasis that I had, I most likely had been experiencing thyroid hormonal problems for some time.
Now, whenever I have a radiation treatment I discontinue my daily t4 supplement for 3 weeks prior to treatment. Needless to say, by the time the treatment comes around I am very aware of function of thyroid hormone through the symptoms I experience.
I'm 26 and was 25 when diagnosed. My age has been both a blessing and a curse while going through the past 2 years. Somehow, my body was able to redirect itself to effectively function in a chronic hypothyroid state.
Now that I take a daily t4 supplement my hands are no longer freezing, my intestine function smoothly, I can focus in class, I don't need to drink a ton of caffeine, and my sex drive is finally where it should be. As well, I've put on 15 lbs of muscle in the 10 months.

Like I said, I'd be happy to answer any questions. I also thought it was important to chime in on this issue these proactive steps Steve recommends would have helped me a great deal 1.5-2 years ago.


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Old 03-11-2006, 05:54 PM   #3
Steve Liberati
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Daniel (Dan),

Thanks for sharing your story. Glad to hear that you were rescued and willing to help out others on with this serious (and often undetected) issue.

BTW, what does your T-4 cycle layout look like? I'm actually quite surprised they prescribed you T-4 instead of T-3, as dosing t4 is much harder because there is no way of determining how much of that will be converted to t3, the more active of the two.

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Old 03-12-2006, 08:43 AM   #4
Daniel Miller
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Steve,
here's what I understand. You're right that t3 is used at a rate of up to 10x in virutally every cell of the body. However, t4 is the hormone that is monitored with regard to TSH secretion. Since, I still have tumor in my lungs and lymph nodes, we want to keep TSH as low as possible (TSH being a growth stimulus). Also, most colloid cells in the thyroid produce much more t4 than t3 because all target tissues have the enzymes necesary to convert t4 to t3. So for people who have had a thyroidectomy t4 is almost always the one prescribed.
The way dosage is monitored is simply by trial and error. I began at .xxxmg and am now taking 3x that based on periodic blood tests where TSH is the main gauge. In terms of certainty about the conversion between t4 to t3 I've got no idea.
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