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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 04-16-2011, 02:14 PM   #1
Adam Dunn
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Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

The premise is an attempt to find the "best" single exercise. Although the butterfly stroke and brisk walking are offered by two experts, others offered the burpie, the squat, and the last contributor offered up the HIT concept. The article concludes that HIT is probably the winner...maybe people are starting to get it!

Article link (WFS).
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Old 04-16-2011, 05:33 PM   #2
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

This is always a pointless hypothetical because we are NEVER going to be limited to just one exercise or just one protocol.
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Old 04-16-2011, 05:48 PM   #3
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

Additionally the article has more than a couple of flaws.

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I think, actually, that you can make a strong case for H.I.T., Gibala said. High-intensity interval training, or H.I.T. as its familiarly known among physiologists, is essentially all-interval exercise.
H.I.T. is normally defined as High Intensity Training, aka one set to failure. High Intensity Interval Training is H.I.I.T., which is multiple sets. Both favor short workouts, but after that they don't have much in common.

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The only glaring inadequacy of H.I.T. is that it builds muscular strength less effectively than, say, the squat.
Clearly the author has confused H.I.T. with H.I.I.T. as well as confused exercise selection with programming tactics. Squats can be used in both H.I.T. style programming such as 20-rep Super Squats and in H.I.I.T. style such as Tabata air squats.

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I personally think that brisk walking is far and away the single best exercise, said Michael Joyner, M.D., a professor of anesthesiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and a leading researcher in the field of endurance exercise.
Walking gets this sort of accolade only when it is compared to decades of doing nothing at all, usually involving geriatrics. For anyone who is in shape, switching to a walking program would result in a dramatic net decrease in fitness.
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Old 04-16-2011, 06:15 PM   #4
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
Walking gets this sort of accolade only when it is compared to decades of doing nothing at all, usually involving geriatrics. For anyone who is in shape, switching to a walking program would result in a dramatic net decrease in fitness.
So the first question that immediately needs to be answered is "best for whom?"

For many of the people on this board, brisk walking doesn't really even count as exercise. It's what you do on a rest day, or how you get from place to place. But for a lot of people, a brisk 30 minute walk every day would be an enormous leap forward, and the other exercises on the list would be borderline impossible.

Katherine
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Old 04-17-2011, 12:51 AM   #5
Sam Ser
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
So the first question that immediately needs to be answered is "best for whom?"

For many of the people on this board, brisk walking doesn't really even count as exercise. It's what you do on a rest day, or how you get from place to place. But for a lot of people, a brisk 30 minute walk every day would be an enormous leap forward, and the other exercises on the list would be borderline impossible.

Katherine
this can't possibly be true. a brisk 30-minute walk represents but a tiny fraction of the activity that even relatively sedentary people do each day. and the benefits of this additional activity are infinitesimal.

walking is only two rungs up the activity ladder from lying on the couch -- one rung above just standing there -- and if that's someone's standard for "fitness," then their standards are way too low.

it's appalling that so many doctors would consider this a sufficient prescription for exercise, given that it does extraordinarily little to improve functional strength, stamina, bone density, or flexibility, and does less for coordination, balance and agility than a few minutes of simple calisthenics would.
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Old 04-17-2011, 01:22 AM   #6
Pearse Shields
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

But still, some people literally do lack the strength and flexibility required for a squat or a push-up (both of which are required for a burpee). It's sad, but true. Many people do not even get 30 minutes total of walking each day. A 30 minute walk is enough to leave many people huffing and puffing like a bellows with their legs burning.
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Old 04-17-2011, 06:06 AM   #7
Sam Ser
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearse Shields View Post
But still, some people literally do lack the strength and flexibility required for a squat or a push-up (both of which are required for a burpee). It's sad, but true. Many people do not even get 30 minutes total of walking each day. A 30 minute walk is enough to leave many people huffing and puffing like a bellows with their legs burning.
then you start with squats to a chair and push-ups from the knees.

most movements are scalable.
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Old 04-17-2011, 06:31 AM   #8
Ryan Dell Whitley
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Ser View Post
this can't possibly be true. a brisk 30-minute walk represents but a tiny fraction of the activity that even relatively sedentary people do each day. and the benefits of this additional activity are infinitesimal.

walking is only two rungs up the activity ladder from lying on the couch -- one rung above just standing there -- and if that's someone's standard for "fitness," then their standards are way too low.

it's appalling that so many doctors would consider this a sufficient prescription for exercise, given that it does extraordinarily little to improve functional strength, stamina, bone density, or flexibility, and does less for coordination, balance and agility than a few minutes of simple calisthenics would.
Power walking is an effective form of steady state aerobic exercise. It is also very effective, when combined with diet, for weight loss in some individuals. I would challenge you to find a very hilly course and walk it as hard as you can for half an hour. It can be humbling.
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Old 04-17-2011, 08:07 AM   #9
Mike Hopper
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Ser View Post
it's appalling that so many doctors would consider this a sufficient prescription for exercise, given that it does extraordinarily little to improve functional strength, stamina, bone density, or flexibility, and does less for coordination, balance and agility than a few minutes of simple calisthenics would.
You must start somewhere. Many of those patients that those physicians are suggesting this sort of activity CANNOT do anything else. Their body is not ready to do more. As sad as it may be, it is the case. For an elderly person, walking may be the only thing they can do AND some may be happy to even do that much!

This is why we don't let lay persons prescribe exercise...
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Old 04-17-2011, 08:16 AM   #10
Kevin J. Fleming
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

Thirty minutes of brisk walking would be a huge improvement in activity level for many people. There are many people who drive everywhere, always take an elevator or escalator, and never dedicate any time to exercise.
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