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Old 02-26-2009, 05:34 PM   #1
Richard Macaulay
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SS Just for beginners

Just looking for a couple of opinions here. Wondering wether the general consensus is that SS is really just for novice lifters and beginners to the iron game??

I have lifted since 16 (now 24), with initial purpose of getting bigger for rugby, little success from this due to poor diet knowledge and willingness to get the food down me+also being very active in many sports.

A couple of years ago i found DC training and put 30lbs on in 14months (Im 6'1 205lbs-was 210 but dropped a couple). I then switched form that to CF last june and have pretty much been on it (xcept when rugby injuries stopped me) ever since. Coming back form injuries now, and wanting to get back on SS next week (iv used it before, last december)....I feel it is basically a great program for any lifter of any experience (unless your a professional olympic lifter/powerlifter) who wants to gain weight and increase the numbers on the basic lifts. Just curious as to others opinions.

Ricky
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:13 PM   #2
Jim Brikman
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Re: SS Just for beginners

SS is a linear program. This means that you try to add weight to the exercises just about every single workout, even if it's only 2 or 5lbs. As long as you are able to add weight to the bar at this rate, you are a "beginner" and SS is for you. The number of years you've been lifting and even the loads you are moving don't have a whole lot to do with it. Or, to put it another way, if you can increase the weight on a lift linearly, doing anything else would be a waste of time.

If you can't add weight at a linear rate, then you probably need an intermediate program. Some good options are Bill Starr 5x5 YOU MUST ENSURE YOU ANNOTATE ALL LINKS WHETHER WORK AND FAMILY SAFE.and The Texas MethodYOU MUST ENSURE YOU ANNOTATE ALL LINKS WHETHER WORK AND FAMILY SAFE.

Last edited by Lynne Pitts : 02-27-2009 at 10:46 AM.
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:42 PM   #3
Matt Thomas
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Re: SS Just for beginners

In my opinion it will probably work for people who've stepped away from heavy lifting even for a little bit, but probably not for too long. I think if you're anything past a beginner it might work to bring you back up to former numbers, but you get to a point where you lift heavy enough where doing 3 sets of 5 with straight sets just gets ridiculous. I could be wrong, but this is my experience.
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:47 PM   #4
Steven Low
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Re: SS Just for beginners

Er, two threads... I'll just post in both...


NOVICE means you're lifting novice weight. wfs

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLi...hStandards.htm


If you've been training for 10 years and are still lifting novice weights... you're a novice. If you're familiar with the lifts and been doing them for decades and still lifting novice weight... you're a novice. If you're a former athlete who used to lift elite weights, but now after a layoff are lifting novice weights.... you're a novice.

If you're a novice, lift in a linear progression. Does not necessarily have to be SS, but it can be.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:23 PM   #5
Gavin Harrison
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Re: SS Just for beginners

Eh, novice just means you're able to make jumps between each training session, 3x per week and make progress. So if you can do that, you can do SS. If you can't.. either practical program or another weekly periodization program will be it for you.. unless you're further along. If you have to ask, you're not further along.
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Old 02-26-2009, 11:27 PM   #6
David Meverden
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Re: SS Just for beginners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
NOVICE means you're lifting novice weight. wfs

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLi...hStandards.htm


If you've been training for 10 years and are still lifting novice weights... you're a novice. If you're familiar with the lifts and been doing them for decades and still lifting novice weight... you're a novice. If you're a former athlete who used to lift elite weights, but now after a layoff are lifting novice weights.... you're a novice.

If you're a novice, lift in a linear progression. Does not necessarily have to be SS, but it can be.


Sorry Steven, but Gavin is correct. In the context of Mark Rippetoe's Novice/Intermediate split "Novice" refers ONLY to the rate of adaptation and has nothing to do with the absolute amount of strength.



This thread on Coach Rippetoe's Q&A page has Rip giving the following advice to a very experienced, quite strong athlete (weight 220, bench & squat of 370):
<b>
A linear progression will work for some period of time on anybody. Being an experienced lifter, it will work for a much shorter period of time on you since you're already adapted to training. The reasons for this are discussed in detail in PPST, your next purchase.
</b>
In this thread Coach Rippetoe advises someone who feels he isn't a novice to do the following:
<b>
You are most likely a novice for a while. But even if you're not, the default way to start is with a straight linear progression, and just see how far it takes you.
</b>

So, if you are going to do SS, it's fairly clear that Mark Rippetoe would tell you to start with the Novice program because you've been off of straight strength training for a while. How long would you be able to maintain a linear increase in weight? Who knows. But riding it until you cannot will be your fastest way to get stronger.
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Last edited by Lynne Pitts : 02-27-2009 at 10:47 AM. Reason: unqualified links
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Old 02-27-2009, 12:58 AM   #7
Steven Webster
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Re: SS Just for beginners

My opinion is that it's better for beginners and worse for more advanced lifters.

135 lifts per week around 85% is not the wisest course of action. Not everyone needs to do all the lifts equally either.
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Old 02-27-2009, 06:27 AM   #8
Steven Low
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Re: SS Just for beginners

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Meverden View Post
Sorry Steven, but Gavin is correct. In the context of Mark Rippetoe's Novice/Intermediate split "Novice" refers ONLY to the rate of adaptation and has nothing to do with the absolute amount of strength.


This thread on Coach Rippetoe's Q&A page has Rip giving the following advice to a very experienced, quite strong athlete (weight 220, bench & squat of 370):
<b>
A linear progression will work for some period of time on anybody. Being an experienced lifter, it will work for a much shorter period of time on you since you're already adapted to training. The reasons for this are discussed in detail in PPST, your next purchase.
</b>
In this thread Coach Rippetoe advises someone who feels he isn't a novice to do the following:
<b>
You are most likely a novice for a while. But even if you're not, the default way to start is with a straight linear progression, and just see how far it takes you.
</b>

So, if you are going to do SS, it's fairly clear that Mark Rippetoe would tell you to start with the Novice program because you've been off of straight strength training for a while. How long would you be able to maintain a linear increase in weight? Who knows. But riding it until you cannot will be your fastest way to get stronger.


Novices, by definition of lifting crappy amounts of weight, WILL be able to do linear progression.

My point being there's 2 ways to say the same thing. I used THIS specific way of saying it mostly because half the people don't know WTF they're doing in the gym most of the time, and it's easier emphasize that they need to start lifting some heavy *** weights.
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Last edited by Lynne Pitts : 02-27-2009 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 02-27-2009, 06:33 AM   #9
Richard Macaulay
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Re: SS Just for beginners

Thanks guys, very useful advice. I checked one of the links that showed body weight compared to roughly how much should be my 1rm, I was between novice and intermidiate on press, and between intermidiate and advanced on everything else i think (off the top of my head).

I enjoyed the program the few short weesk i tried it before, i had started under my 5rm's so never had to truly push to my limit, so im looking foreword to testing myself now and seeing what i can achieve. Im enjoying the milk aswell, which i guess can be the hardest part.

Apart from the obvious strength gains that i know will come, the main reason is the weight gain aspect....getting from 205 to 217-224 is my main goal at the moment?!

Ricky
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Old 02-27-2009, 08:35 AM   #10
David Meverden
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Re: SS Just for beginners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Macaulay View Post
getting from 205 to 217-224 is my main goal at the moment?!

Ricky
you aren't sure? haha
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