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Old 12-12-2005, 12:41 PM   #1
John Burket
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't bodybuilding use large numbers of reps with a small weight, and and in weightlifting it is the reverse?

My main goal is strength, but I noticed that I am more prone to injury. I tried doing one-arm chin-ups unsuccessfully (the other arm freely dangling), and seemed to damage something in my elbows. I then tried a ridiculously low weight (4-5 kg), and pumped my arms dozens of times using curls and tricep presses. Surprisingly, the pain in my joints went away. Any comments?

John
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Old 12-12-2005, 02:21 PM   #2
Ben Kaminski
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Sounds like you "walked it off."

Are you close to getting your one arm chin? If not then you're lucky you didn't get hurt badly. Weightlifting is about building up slowly, specifically so that injury IS avoided.
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Old 12-12-2005, 06:25 PM   #3
John Velandra
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John,
To answer your question about bodybuilding.... there's so many diferent protocols out there that you can't lump them into one spot.

While there are many that do numerous reps with lighter weight, there's just as many that come from power lifting and using the max weight possible. It'll boil down to the individual and there take on how training works.

I for one believe that you should lift heavy weights even up to competition (read that as appropriately challenging and not stupid lifts for stupid sake).

Logic is that if you are used to lifting heavy in the 4 - 6, 4 to 10 rep range and then change it to get ready for a show by going light - you actually detrain your muscles and become weaker!

As long as nutrition is on the money - eating based on the zone or modifications from that ratio, you should actually be coming in harder and stronger than when you had more bodyfat.

Just my .02 worth
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Old 12-12-2005, 11:46 PM   #4
John Burket
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John, thanks for the expert advice. What do you (or anyone else) think about a mix between light and heavy, say using light weights, and then isometrics to get the muscles hard? If a mixed routine is a good idea, should the soft routine be performed first, followed by a hard routine? My primary goal is to be strong first, and yet obtain some bulk for appearance.

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Old 12-13-2005, 12:38 AM   #5
Nikki Young
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John, i wouldn't reccomend doing any isometric movement to help you develope more strength, except for exercises such as the L-sit which will take your core strength to extremes!

If you want to develope strength, i would reccomend obviously the WOD's, and also getting your hands on some sandbags, tire's, sledge hammer, etc. Zach Evan-Esh has some great workouts on this type of training, which you can see here: http://www.undergroundstrengthcoach.com/ And here: http://www.combatgrappler.com/

With the light weights - isometric workout. Do you mean using that to place fatigue on the muscles FIRST then work them again harder?? This works, but i still don't think you need to go isometric for it, just do one exercise with low weight, then for the 2nd set up the weight. You can also go the other way, so you start with the heaviest you can lift (1RM) then slowly work your way down, with each round of lighter weight going until failure. This ones a killer.

You can also do an exercise which fatigues one of the muscle groups first, so in the 2nd round the other primary muscle needs to work harder. For instance, doing a set of push-ups with narrow hand stance to hit the triceps, then going to the bench press. Because your triceps are quite fatigued, your pecs are going to be working harder.

Just some thoughs.
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Old 12-13-2005, 01:45 AM   #6
John Burket
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Nikki, the links you provided certainly look like fun! I've always loved to participate in athletic competitions, ever since I was one of three students selected for the Marine Corps physical fitness program back in the '60s. (I did 115 push-ups, the school record.) My wife and I entered wristwrestling competitions, and had great fun, especially watching my wife pull over a woman twice her size! I once was put up against a little, wirey guy who I was certain I could beat, but he shocked me when he put me down relatively quickly. That told me that it is muscle hardness, not bulk, that counts for strength. I'm working on getting both, although it is a little late (maybe it's never too late in life). In the World Wristwrestling championships, I was pitted against a guy who was extremely fast (he was a baseball pitcher), and before you could blink your eyes, he pulled me over 90%. The last 10% took him about a minute. He went on to place second in his weight class. I seem to recall reading something about white muscles for speed, and red muscles for endurance. Can anyone shed more light on this? I'm looking to obtain hard, big, and fast muscles.

Johnb
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Old 12-13-2005, 07:30 AM   #7
Neal Winkler
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That told me that it is muscle hardness, not bulk, that counts for strength.

John, the following article will shed some light this statement for you. http://www.usa-gymnastics.org/publications/technique/1996/8/strength-training.ht ml

It's a strength training article for gymnastics but it goes over the anatomy and physiolgy of strength.

You'll find in the article that muscle size DOES correspond to strength. The bigger your muscles are, the bigger your muscle fibers. The bigger your muscle fibers, the more force that they can contract with and thus the stronger you will be. However, the rub is "how many muscle fibers can you VOLUNTARILY contract?" For any movement we don't use ALL our muscle fibers, and different types of training will allow you to use more muscle fibers for some given movement. So it is possible for someone who has smaller muscles to be stronger than someone with bigger muscles if they have the ability to contract more muscle fibers than the big person - but if the bigger person was able to contract just as many they would be the stronger of the two, as, like I said, bigger fibers = more forceful contraction.

So, in your case the man with the smaller muscles just had the ability to contract more muscle fibers such that the sum of his many small muscle fibers were greater than the sum of your few bigger muscle fibers.
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Old 12-13-2005, 08:59 AM   #8
Lincoln Brigham
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Bodybuilding is a male beauty contest where the object is big muscles.

Weightlifting is a sport where the object is to take the heaviest weight possible from the ground to overhead.
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Old 12-13-2005, 11:31 AM   #9
John Velandra
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I always wanted to be in a beauty contest... LOL

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Old 12-13-2005, 11:37 AM   #10
Ian Holmes
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John

Do static holds buddy. They are the single best things for strength gains with the current mass you have on your body.
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