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Old 10-30-2004, 07:39 AM   #1
Paul Kayley
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Does eating a complex protein cause reduced gastric emptying? It would make sense as meat needs some considerable time in the stomach to break down? Would this include casein powder which is said to 'ball up' and digest very slowly?

Also is it right that complex proteins stimulate a considerable glucagon response? I believe that the answer to all these questions is yes, but I'd like confirmation and to know if anyone knows more detail? (Any related articles/research on controlling gastric emptying?)

I am trying to use protein to further control the rate of release of the low GI carbs into my system in order to minimise insulin response. I am figuring that by always eating a complex protein (lean meat or casein powder) with low GI carbs I will minimise insulin while including carbs in my diet.
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Old 10-30-2004, 08:18 AM   #2
Paul Kayley
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Some interesting details regarding protein here.... casein better as an anti-catabolic protein... eggs best protein for slowing gastric emptying, etc

http://www.universalnutrition.com/en...stprotiein.cfm
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Old 10-30-2004, 01:29 PM   #3
Robert Wolf
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Paul-

It makes sense and seems to fall into line with Zone recomendations and historical experience. I do however remember reading aobut protien/carb combos increasing insulin response despite slower gastric emptying. This stuff starts getting complex and inner related at such a rate that it becomes hard to do anything which does not directly feed back and inhibit the desired goal.

I suspect that with the mixed meal approach one flys under the hormonal radar by keeping meal sizes small.
Robb
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Old 10-31-2004, 03:05 AM   #4
Paul Kayley
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Rob, do you think that these insulin increases reported with mixed meals were taking into account the speed of the protein and carbs being digested?

I tend to eat small meals anyway, about 500 Kcal per meal, 6-7 times per day.
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Old 10-31-2004, 07:25 AM   #5
Robert Wolf
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Paul-

I do not rememer any of the specifics. I think "mixed meals" and "insulin response" were thesearch terms I used at pubmed.
Robb
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Old 10-31-2004, 12:25 PM   #6
Brian Hand
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Paul, bodybuilders have experimented with this quite a bit and the case for mixed proteins is pretty strong. Whey can be absorbed so fast that much of it winds up being burned as sugar (gluconeogenesis). Whey can in and of itself cause an insulin spike. I don't know to what extent protein slows carb absorbtion; adding oil to protein shakes definitely does. Adding fiber also seems to. A lot of bodybuilders experimented with various concoctions and used a glucometer to gauge their success, maybe that would be helpful for you.
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Old 10-31-2004, 03:36 PM   #7
Paul Kayley
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Thanks Rob and Brian, looking at using zone type nutrition for next season's preparation, in addition to maximising glycogen sparing via the use of insulin-free glucose transport and inhibited pancreatic response during all medium to high intensity endurance training.

Is the Athlete's Zone worth buying?
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Old 10-31-2004, 04:34 PM   #8
Robert Wolf
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Paul-

Not really a book on the athletes zone. Just standard zone prescription and then when one has reached <10% bodyfat the fat blocks are ratcheted up anywhere from 2-5x. it sounds like you are getting post WO notrition handled and I think the only other piece is in event nutrition which Mark dealt with in the thread gastric emptying and high heart rate, do you remember that one?
Robb
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Old 11-01-2004, 02:27 AM   #9
Paul Kayley
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Yes thanks Rob
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Old 11-01-2004, 04:20 AM   #10
Paul Kayley
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Found this interesting read...some very good stuff re using fats to slow gastric emptying plus increase fat metabolism while reducing its storage...

http://www.drdebe.com/EAT%20FAT.htm

Rob, what do you think of the claims regarding a preference of PUFAs over monounsaturated fats... article flaws?
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