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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 06-08-2011, 06:29 PM   #11
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: How to train the "softer" aspects of fitness

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Originally Posted by David Meverden View Post
Some time ago I thought about this for a while in the context of Balance. What is the best activity to test balance? What does it mean to say someone has excellent balance? How does one build a broadly applicable balance skill?
Given that falls are a major cause of injuries, one way to look at it might be to ask how often the average person stumbles, whether by tripping on a pothole, stepping on ice, missing the edge of a step. Any person with a lower-than-average number of falls has better balance/agility -- not sure it's possible to separate the two -- than average.

The problem is getting a large enough data sample. My MTBF (mean time between falls) is measured in years. I suspect I have better balance than average, but I'm not up there in gymnast/acrobat territory. So you'd need to track a lot of people for a very long time to get decent statistics.

Physical therapists have a collection of standard tests for assessing balance. But my experience with them is that they are too easy, mostly aimed at people with impaired balance, not at differentiating between average, very good, and outstanding.

Katherine
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:33 PM   #12
Jon Gregory
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Re: How to train the "softer" aspects of fitness

Like Shane said, beyond developing general athletcism most things are sport specific. Example: a batsman in cricket has to have super fast reactions and coordination to play a fast bowler but most would look slow and clumsy in a boxing ring.
That being said, certain things do have a general training principle. Balance is a good example. Balance boards are good training tools.
Change of direction drills have broad application but don't really come up in WODs on CF.com or most people's gym training.
Skipping rope for coordination, timing and aerobic capacity.
The floor to ceiling ball is great for improving hand eye coordination, timing, etc..
More basic, get a tennis ball, throw it at a wall at different angles and move to stop or catch it. Increase difficulty by facing away from wall, turn and throw quickly. Use different size/shape balls.
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Old 06-08-2011, 08:00 PM   #13
Terry Gibbs
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Re: How to train the "softer" aspects of fitness

In throwing we look at hurdles, stepping over, and under, forward, backwards, sideways, also some hopping up onto boxes of various heights, sideways, forwards, with rotation, one legged, two legged, varations are endless, plus some do tumbling, tumbling combined with jumps etc etc.....and benefits are general not skill specific


HOWEVER ...when one of our Nat level throwers ..."Big Bad Bennie Haradine", (2nd last years Continetal Cup and world ranked 9th for the year..and yes that is how he is known) moved to Germany to live and trained with one of their major sports clubs, he found that everyone warmup up by playing soccer, the elete international level, jumpers, volley ball players, throwers etc etc (imagine 100kg women and 120-130kg men playing soccer) ....after he had been doing it for a while he understood why

this aspect of "fitness" can address mobilty, co-ordination, etc etc

good topic
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Old 06-08-2011, 08:10 PM   #14
Jon Gregory
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Re: How to train the "softer" aspects of fitness

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Originally Posted by Terry Gibbs View Post
In throwing we look at hurdles, stepping over, and under, forward, backwards, sideways, also some hopping up onto boxes of various heights, sideways, forwards, with rotation, one legged, two legged, varations are endless, plus some do tumbling, tumbling combined with jumps etc etc.....and benefits are general not skill specific


HOWEVER ...when one of our Nat level throwers ..."Big Bad Bennie Haradine", (2nd last years Continetal Cup and world ranked 9th for the year..and yes that is how he is known) moved to Germany to live and trained with one of their major sports clubs, he found that everyone warmup up by playing soccer, the elete international level, jumpers, volley ball players, throwers etc etc (imagine 100kg women and 120-130kg men playing soccer) ....after he had been doing it for a while he understood why

this aspect of "fitness" can address mobilty, co-ordination, etc etc

good topic
English cricket team always warm up with soccer but they had to tone it down when a couple of players got injured!
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Old 06-10-2011, 05:37 AM   #15
Edwin Burlton
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Re: How to train the "softer" aspects of fitness

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
Do you mean to tell me that one of the great cities of the world has no neighborhood recreational sports leagues? No informal skateboarding/rollerblading/parkour groups? No pickup games in the park on weekends?

Katherine
No, I'm not, but what I do mean to tell you is that at the moment I'm just interested in general fitness across all aspects, and to be honest don't really feel like taking up a new sport, although I am gonna do boxing in October once I get to university. Also I think it's quite an interesting theoretical exercise to consider how these skills might be developed in a broadly applicable manner. Been doing some throwing and catching drills in my warm-ups (e.g. throwing two tennis balls at a wall and then catching one in each hand, throwing one and then spinning before I catch it etc) because I think throwing and catching are some of the most universally applicable skills - more so than hand-balancing for example (I am doing a little bit of handstand work, but that's just because it looks damn cool).
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Old 06-10-2011, 05:48 AM   #16
Matthew Swartz
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Re: How to train the "softer" aspects of fitness

Play badminton. It will make you quicker than lightning, especially if you challenge the Indian guys like I do.



I always lose to them.
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