CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > Community > CrossPit
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

CrossPit For discussing MMA, UFC, Pride fighting, and other martial arts

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-19-2007, 12:13 AM   #1
Shaun Trainor
Member Shaun Trainor is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sydney  NSW
Posts: 9
I was looking for exercises to develop more power in my shin kicks. I had thought that this would have been covered, but after an hour or two of looking through the archives, I couldn't find it.

Anyway, so far most of my exercises have focused on knee and ankle extension (planter? always mix those 2 up). 1&2RMs on cleans and hang cleans, vertical jumps, depth jumps, plus a lot of 1-legged kb oly lifts. I chucked in some rotational work, such as woodchoppers etc, but found it hard to do as power work.

I ran into a mate of mine last weekend, and had this discussion with him. His opinion was that it was hip flexion that I really needed to worry about.

I feel that its the first part of the kick, with pushing the kicking leg off the floor, and then extending the knee at the end which needed the most attention.
I've spent a fair bit of time looking around the net for other people's opinions, but they've been surprisingly hard to find. Lots on punching, very little for shin kicks.

I was looking for ideas and dis/agreement from other CFers as to this. I'm fighting in five weeks today, so I've missed the boat to a degree, in that I've start toning down the power stuff soon, but still, an interesting subject, no?
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 04:17 AM   #2
Leon Robotham
Member Leon Robotham is offline
 
Leon Robotham's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne  North East
Posts: 2,751
Shaun

don't take this the wrong way but if you are fighting in 5 weeks time and are unsure how to generate power for kicks then you shouldn't be fighing at all.

In order for you to have a powerful round kick or low point you have to remain relaxed this allows you to be fast when you are fast you are powerful. In Muay Thai (my chosen sport) you kick with your shins which can be damaging to you if not used correctly or properly conditioned. When used on an opponent you can drop people with low point only.

Im orthodox, my heavy round or low point is back leg. I remain on my toes and generate power from the ground up, you have to remember to turn the grounded foot in the same direction of the kick carrying the movement from the grounded leg to the hips, when the hips come in you must twist powerfully and rotate the shoulders while doing all of this you must bring your shin down in an arc so that the bone of the shin cuts into the target. Keep the toes pointed and please make sure you avoid kicking elbows or hips (it aint good)

hard to explain but thats about it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 04:31 AM   #3
Leon Robotham
Member Leon Robotham is offline
 
Leon Robotham's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne  North East
Posts: 2,751
Oh sorry and the only thing that will help you is to practice. I personally have kicked left leg only for sessions just to get the technique down. grease that groove!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 05:04 AM   #4
Fiona Muxlow
Affiliate Fiona Muxlow is offline
 
Fiona Muxlow's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Townsville  QLD
Posts: 518
Shaun,welcome. What are you fighing in?

Power for shin kicks comes from the hip not the knee, think Body weight vs musclar reaction.

Kettlebell and dumbbell swings are the best exercise i have found to help generate the hip powered need for a strong shin kick.

That being said,hours of accumulated practice on the thai pads and having the correct technique and foot work also go along way ;P
Step across with your non-kicking leg, opening up your hips and leading with them and make sure you accelarate into the kick. Think swinging a baseball bat, the power comes from your hands swinging at the the handle (your hip), the impact point is the bat (your shin) and by the time it hits the ball (or you oponet) your shin in travelling faster than the hip. Bending at the knee can actually weaken the kick so try and avoid that. But keep the leg relaxed but still strong, to much tension will slow the kick.


Have a watch of the clip below (family and work safe as long as you dont mind watch two girls fight full contact karate) from a kyokushin tournament, this match is a few years old and I (Back to camera) kick better now, but im still working on them, if you look closly you can see the kicks that lead with the hip and those that are just leg.Get hit with a hip-lead shin kick and the leg either is pushed away or buckles, Kicks that aren't generated from the hip are easy to work through/check and usually end up with the person who throws them off balance.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jsf61Jf_OYA

Fiona


(Message edited by Fiona on January 19, 2007)
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 05:23 AM   #5
Shaun Trainor
Member Shaun Trainor is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sydney  NSW
Posts: 9
Sorry guys, I think I've been unclear in my post. I'm not asking how to kick, or for technique pointers. I ask my coaches about that sort of thing.

I was looking for a CF perspective on exercises which increase the power development in the muscles used in kicking, just like using medballs to help punches.

Fiona, I'm just training for a straight kickboxing fight, no knees or anything. I'd like to get into full MMA in the future, but I'm not sure that my job will let me. They keep sending me overseas :-(
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 05:45 AM   #6
Fiona Muxlow
Affiliate Fiona Muxlow is offline
 
Fiona Muxlow's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Townsville  QLD
Posts: 518
I say again Kettlebell swings!
And good old tabata kicking doesn't go astray either..

Good Luck
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 05:54 AM   #7
Gary Turner
Member Gary Turner is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Church Crookham  Hampshire
Posts: 88
Hi!

If you want any help with the kicking, I can give some good advice that gives quick results...don't hesitate to email me at gary@teamgaryturner.com and I'll see what I can do to help!

In respect to training for more power development to help kicking, there are two areas you need to work on.

Firstly, work your core and your hip flexors. These are the main driving movers for the kick, and if these are strong and flexible you can always make the most of any kick.

The second is to work plyometric movements for the leg. In particular, my plyo workouts specifically for kick speed include tuck jumps, squat jumps, split squat jumps, and leg hops. As before, give me an email if you want more help with the plyometric sides. The plyo work help with the explosive start of the kick, which, combined with the withdrawal of a kick are the slowest parts.

Overall though the elements to get power to a kick are to increase the speed. The quickest way to get a speed increase is to work on technique and having no tension in the kick movement - if you add tension, its like driving a car with your foot on the break - you make a lot of noise and spend energy but don't go anywhere!

Fiona, although as always everyone puts a different spin on their way of doing a technique so I would explain it a different way for basically the same thing, I like your post!!

Hope this helps!

Smiler
www.teamgaryturner.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 07:09 AM   #8
Becca Borawski
Affiliate Becca Borawski is offline
 
Becca Borawski's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Portland  OR
Posts: 1,231
"I was looking for a CF perspective on exercises which increase the power development in the muscles used in kicking, just like using medballs to help punches."

I think the issue gets a little confused because depending on HOW you're kicking, will change how to develop the muscles. I was always taught not to "flick" my lower leg and foot on a kick, to generate all the power from my hip and let the rest of the leg be a big baseball bat -- therefore, your mate would be right, you want to develop hip power.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 08:34 AM   #9
Leon Robotham
Member Leon Robotham is offline
 
Leon Robotham's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne  North East
Posts: 2,751
Becca would be on point there. If you look at the photo she has to the left and check out the planted foot, this is what I was trying to describe to you earlier.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2007, 09:52 AM   #10
Bill Russell
Affiliate Bill Russell is offline
 
Bill Russell's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Cleveland  OH
Posts: 503
turning the planted foot away from the target helps to allow the hips to go through. 90 is good, 180 is better.IMO
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shin fins Fiona Muxlow Equipment 9 02-24-2012 12:45 AM
My Mom Kicks A**! James Dent Testimonials 1 03-16-2007 05:37 AM
Shin splints Jeff Arms Injuries 4 12-10-2005 02:13 PM
Shin splints Andy Hilven Injuries 11 05-02-2005 11:57 AM
CrossFit "kicks butt"! Rob Moss Testimonials 1 12-30-2002 04:24 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.