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Running a CrossFit Facility Tips and guidance on how to open and operate a CrossFit gym.

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Old 10-15-2006, 12:05 PM   #1
Laura Head
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Wondering how many of you structured your personal training and CF classes when opening up new CF gym. We are four individual personal trainers who are sold on CF, but we don't have a large CF base and are just sharing it w/ the sports community in our area (we are in the process of affiliation). We had decided that we would offer a few intro to CF classes that were low key and if the folks liked it, we would require 5 personal training sessions before they could go further into some of the harder WOD (in a group setting, and for a cheaper price). Here is the problem, we are finding it difficult on the front end to convince people that the 5 sessions are worth the price. But we don't want to offer so many intro classes, that people become satisfied w/ doing the intro benchmark workouts in a group for 10 dollars a pop and never explore some of the advantages of the o lifts and other exercises that require one on one instruction before moving into a group. Also, we don't want to get in a situation where we are paying overhead to teach 2 people a group class (i.e. not making any takehome for the instructor). Does my question make sense?
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Old 10-18-2006, 05:31 PM   #2
Joe Celso
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makes sense to me. i'm concerned with the same issues. what i'm doing to get started is rounding up as many friends as i can fit in my available time and offering them an introductory term (8 wks, 11/6-12/30) at a significant discount. i'm explaining to everyone what my normal pricing structure will be after this term, as well as what it would cost for the "same" service at a big box gym. i'm doing this so they understand what a deal they are getting and that they should jump in NOW before i can't afford the opportunity cost (turning away real money to train them at a discount). after 8 wks, they will have advanced enough to see the adavantage of going through the learning stage and into the WOD stage. at this point, once i have transformed them into walking billboards (just in time for new years), the word should be out and i'm hopefull demand will exceed supply in relatively short order.
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Old 10-18-2006, 08:41 PM   #3
Keith Wittenstein
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If people like the group classes, then keep letting them do group classes. If people want to do privates then let them do that. You can teach oly lifts with broomsticks, dumbbells and medicine balls in a group setting. You don't have to do it one-on-one. In fact, it might be easier if people can watch each other and critique each other. I think Coach Burgener and Dan John teach the O-lifts to their high school kids in gym class. So you shouldn't think that it requires so much personal attention except in special cases.

Another option is to do small beginner classes. Offer a four or eight session deal...or whatever number makes sense. Charge a little more and cap the number to 4 or 8 (something managable). Then give them the option for privates or group classes.



(Message edited by musashi on October 18, 2006)
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Old 10-24-2006, 10:29 AM   #4
Jeremy Jones
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We are going to be offering something called "Semi-Private" classes where the athletes get to work with one trainer and just a few other athletes (basically this is a guarenteed 'small' group). The price is a lot more reasonable for most people compared to private training, but you still get a lot of attention (compared to a large group).

Also, to make our 'private' classes distinguished from our 'semi-privates' we are going to do a lot more progress monitoring with private clients (PRs, diet, goals, etc).


We are going to make punch cards that people can buy to get discount sets of classes (the more you buy, the better the deal). That way, people can make smaller commitments and come as their schedule permits, but we trainers get the money up front (to help with the overhead).


I know that this is the exact opposite of how most big box gyms work (relying on the "Commit and quit" principle). We know that people will keep coming because they want to, and because the results speak for themselves.
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Old 10-24-2006, 08:18 PM   #5
Laura Head
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Thanks for the input. All great ideas. Laura
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Old 10-25-2006, 03:53 AM   #6
Mike ODonnell
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Have free classes on the weekends at a local park....get people addicted to working out and they will pay the money to come to the facility as really there is no other gym that you can workout like that. Don't try to sell them on the workout...it sells itself....just need to get them in the door however you can.
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Old 10-27-2006, 04:37 AM   #7
Laura Head
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Great point. While I have some of you here, what personal training certification would you recommend. I feel the need to get one, for the simple fact of having a credential. I am knowledgable and feel if I studied I could pass a number of them. Not saying I know everything, I certainly don't. But feel it necessary to get a certification in personal training. ACSM, CSCS, ACE personal training? Others? We are training all kinds, teams, housewives, triathletes, etc.
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Old 10-27-2006, 04:41 AM   #8
Laura Head
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Need to mention I am an RN and have been a group fitness instructor for 19 years and have had a small number of personal training clients in the past. I have a degree in nutrition and a degree in nursing, but only an ACE group fitness certification. Over the years I have taught it all, Jane Fonda to spinning to stability ball. Thanks for the input.
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Old 10-27-2006, 05:03 AM   #9
Joe Marsh
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Laura, in regards to certification, if you haven't already gotten CF certified, that is obviously number one. Next in line would be USAWeightlifting Club Coach. Maybe, after that, NSCA-CSCS. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 10-27-2006, 05:52 AM   #10
Mike ODonnell
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NSCA is the organization I would get just for a standard CPT. The CSCS is a type of certification degree.....you can also get a standard CPT cert from them as well. The CSCS holds more water if you are looking to get employed by someone and is alot more technical....otherwise the CPT is good too. Sad fact most people don't know the difference between the degrees out there so they just assume that "certified" is the same for all trainers. If you want to teach Xfit then get the Xfit cert as well as the actually cert is more informative than any of the others out there.
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