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Old 11-30-2006, 09:25 PM   #1
Jan Szyndler
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Can anyone help me out with a link(s) to some good sites that describe roator cuff prehab/rehab exercises?

Thanks very much!!
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Old 12-01-2006, 01:53 AM   #2
Andy Shirley
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http://www.vsm.vanderbilt.edu/rotcuff.pdf

work/family safe link to my old employers patient handout on rotatot cuff tears.

http://www.vsm.vanderbilt.edu/docume...ngebooklet.pdf

same site for impingement.

They had a link to prehab exercises, but the link is gone.

I'll see what I can find elsewhere.

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Old 12-01-2006, 01:56 AM   #3
Andy Shirley
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This ones not bad:

http://www.uop.edu/AthleticPerformance/exercise%20videos/shoulder%20prehab%20vid eos/shoulder_prehab_exercises.htm

link to videos of prehab exercises, academic site, work fam safe.
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Old 12-02-2006, 07:32 PM   #4
Jan Szyndler
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Thank you very much for the help!!! :-)
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Old 12-14-2006, 05:34 AM   #5
Leon Robotham
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After picking up a shoulder injury while grappling I decided that there had to be some sort of exercise to rehabilitate. Two things I found worked extremely well were the KB TGU and the Indian club pendulum. The indian club seemed to oil the joint and help it to get warmed up before moving onto the TGU's. My shoulder has been fine since.
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Old 12-14-2006, 10:24 AM   #6
Rene Renteria
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Eric Cressey has written a t-nation article on the rotator cuff, here (not w/f safe):

http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle....le=280rotator2

He answers some readers' questions in the comments, too.

Here's another, similar article from Mike Robertson (not w/f safe):

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=538204

Best,
Rene'
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Old 12-14-2006, 10:26 AM   #7
Rene Renteria
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Forgot one more (not w/f safe), which also has a couple of mobility/flexibility tests:

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=818555
8 Weeks to Monster Shoulders
by Alwyn Cosgrove and Chad Waterbury
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Old 12-14-2006, 03:01 PM   #8
Rene Renteria
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Yet one more:

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1238411
In Defense of Overhead Lifting
by Charles Staley and Keats Snideman
"...
Therapeutic Strategies: Isolationistic Vs. Integrative Approach

Probably the most popular therapeutic strategy these days is to perform so-called "corrective exercises" for the rotator cuff muscles which involve isolated joint movements. The idea is to attempt to "isolate" one or more of the rotator cuff muscles to restore its strength.

One thing that always struck us as counterproductive is that during any type of isolation exercises, you're adding unnatural stress to the muscle and its tendons. After all, in "real life" movements, the goal is to share and distribute the load among several muscles rather than trying to focus the stress on just one.

We think it goes back to our obsession for fatigue — when you isolate a muscle, you significantly increase the stress imposed upon it and then experience the glorified lactate build-up, fatigue, trembling, and finally total muscle failure if you make it that far. For those who are suffering from any kind of tendonitis in the shoulder girdle region, these isolated rotator cuff exercises might actually increase pain and inflammation to the region and make your shoulder feel worse.

In contrast, the use of PNF and spiral-diagonal patterns of movement activate multiple muscles and can serve as much more integrated rotator cuff exercises. In this fashion, you strengthen the supposedly weak rotator cuff muscles along with the other players (pecs, lats, delts, long head of biceps and triceps, traps, rhomboids, serratus muscles) so that an integrated orchestra of movement occurs that's much more functional and similar to real life movement. As the saying goes, the body knows only of movements, not muscles.
..."
---
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