CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-27-2014, 01:36 AM   #11
Aushion Chatman
Affiliate Aushion Chatman is offline
 
Aushion Chatman's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 3,342
Re: How to Fix Crossfit - t-nation article

Wow, I think that was a terrible article...

Basically the author said CrossFit was broken, then generalized and assumed his way through imaginary problems.

I think if he was sincere, what he was saying basically is, if you CrossFit you should be smart about it, and if you can't be smart about it (through the unavoidable ignorance of being a newbie at this) then go get a coach who is smart about it.

Like someone already posted, that is already spelled out (in greater and better written detail) on the "Start here" link on main site.

The high skill/low skill "label" by his own definition will be unique for each person. So why then would you label anything??! That makes zero sense. Very weird article IMHO.
__________________
My Youtube Channel
CFSD Yelp
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2014, 01:44 AM   #12
Aushion Chatman
Affiliate Aushion Chatman is offline
 
Aushion Chatman's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 3,342
Re: How to Fix Crossfit - t-nation article

Oh and handstands are a GREAT skill to develop. Body line, tightness, balance, shoulder mobility, support strength, proprioceptive training, AND because they take so LONG to develop correctly they teach you patience in your training and how to deal with plateau's and failure which tend to happen on any fitness path.
__________________
My Youtube Channel
CFSD Yelp
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2014, 05:46 AM   #13
Price Goosby
Member Price Goosby is offline
 
Price Goosby's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Schenectady  NY
Posts: 663
Re: How to Fix Crossfit - t-nation article

I understand the not over doing it scheme they're going for but it comes off more as "stop trying so hard".

The WOD examples they put up are really no different than what you'd see at your average box too, it makes me think they looked at the girls or the hero WODs and assumed it's what people do every day.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2014, 10:54 AM   #14
Mauricio Leal
Affiliate Mauricio Leal is offline
 
Mauricio Leal's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oakland  CA
Posts: 839
Re: How to Fix Crossfit - t-nation article

Honestly I think this all boils down to job security and turf wars. The rest of the fitness industry is based upon several piers that the CF model is threatening:

1) The Performance Art of Training (over actual coaching): Think of all the Group X classes where the trainer does the workout with you, dances around, gives cliched motivational quips for the duration.

2) The Snowflake Mentality: You are so special, so you need a special program. When you really decide to be successful and shed those last stubborn pounds, you pay extra for the special Private Training Sauce where your **** gets CUSTOMIZED to a super advanced level.

3) Trade Secrets: When you're good at something never do it for free. The old model is great at constantly recycling the notion that they just unearthed buried SECRET treasure at an archaeological dig of super smartness, and packaging it and marketing it appropriately to squeeze out the next 6-month contract. Yet somehow their clients remain largely large and unimproved.

CF is basically deconstructing all of these things, and showing people the value of simple things (real lifting, real coaching, real intensity, community, etc.). Real coaches don't do the workouts with their clients. CF is normalizing and basically giving away (well, at no additional cost anyway) all of the best practices that have stood the test of time (and a few new ones that are proving useful). For everyday athletes (not competitors), almost any solid strength program layered with reasonable metcons that is well-executed is wildly successful compared to all the carefully measured BS most people come from.

Finally, we're educating people to understand why they can do all these things, and potentially become smarter and even more fit than their coaches. This is massively threatening to the grift, where a large part of your credibility is your superior athleticism due to past accolades that could only be developed through...actual sports training. And because CF resembles sport more closely than modern conventional training, coincidentally (or not) and without merit, this is being as ammo to suggest the lack of safety inherent to the program, to draw people back into the welcoming arms of those who have it all figured out.
__________________
CrossFit Cypher
www.crossfitcypher.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2014, 12:15 PM   #15
Steven Wingo
Member Steven Wingo is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ocala  FL
Posts: 506
Re: How to Fix Crossfit - t-nation article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauricio Leal View Post
Honestly I think this all boils down to job security and turf wars. The rest of the fitness industry is based upon several piers that the CF model is threatening:

1) The Performance Art of Training (over actual coaching): Think of all the Group X classes where the trainer does the workout with you, dances around, gives cliched motivational quips for the duration.

2) The Snowflake Mentality: You are so special, so you need a special program. When you really decide to be successful and shed those last stubborn pounds, you pay extra for the special Private Training Sauce where your **** gets CUSTOMIZED to a super advanced level.

3) Trade Secrets: When you're good at something never do it for free. The old model is great at constantly recycling the notion that they just unearthed buried SECRET treasure at an archaeological dig of super smartness, and packaging it and marketing it appropriately to squeeze out the next 6-month contract. Yet somehow their clients remain largely large and unimproved.

CF is basically deconstructing all of these things, and showing people the value of simple things (real lifting, real coaching, real intensity, community, etc.). Real coaches don't do the workouts with their clients. CF is normalizing and basically giving away (well, at no additional cost anyway) all of the best practices that have stood the test of time (and a few new ones that are proving useful). For everyday athletes (not competitors), almost any solid strength program layered with reasonable metcons that is well-executed is wildly successful compared to all the carefully measured BS most people come from.

Finally, we're educating people to understand why they can do all these things, and potentially become smarter and even more fit than their coaches. This is massively threatening to the grift, where a large part of your credibility is your superior athleticism due to past accolades that could only be developed through...actual sports training. And because CF resembles sport more closely than modern conventional training, coincidentally (or not) and without merit, this is being as ammo to suggest the lack of safety inherent to the program, to draw people back into the welcoming arms of those who have it all figured out.
Some of the folks who REALLY hate what CrossFit is doing to the health and fitness world, and perceive it as a major threat, are the financially successful globo gyms and--in particular--the makers of machines and most fancy cardio equipment. There is huge money earned by the makers of treadmills, ellipticals, spinning bikes, and weight machines you see in the old fitness industry model. They do not like seeing the minimalist approach of CrossFit boxes which have little need for their equipment.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 10:44 AM   #16
Tommy Sittinger
Member Tommy Sittinger is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Winchester  VA
Posts: 89
Re: How to Fix Crossfit - t-nation article

My takeaway from this article was to perform high skill/technical movements when fresh and exclusive from the metcon, and to not include highly technical movements in the WOD unless you have true mastery of that movement's a very light load (75# snatches for example, or 95# HPC). It's important to develop the various skills, but I feel that it's not so important to inculde all of them in a WOD until the athlete has plenty of experience.

For example, when you think about it, you can get almost as smoked doing thrusters as you can doing high rep C&J's, with hardly any of the risk assosciated with C&J's (mix in heavy swings for added fun to address the hip extension and grip work missing with the thrusters). I feel that it's a bad idea for most people to mix burpees and snatches in general, let alone with increasing weights as you get more fatigued. A dumbbell/kettlebell snatch would be much more appropriate for these individuals.

I don't think that this artcile was bashing CF just that common sense needs to be used, as is the case with the more forward thinking affiliate owners.

My $0.02
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
T-nation article Graeme Marshall Community 15 04-30-2009 01:28 AM
T-Nation article Adam Head Exercises 26 04-18-2008 06:41 AM
New Dan John article at T-Nation Jay Cohen Community 3 02-15-2008 08:30 AM
T-nation Article Russ Greene Community 32 07-11-2006 09:02 PM
Interesting article on T-Nation Mikael Všlitalo Fitness 0 08-14-2005 04:25 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.