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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 05-26-2008, 09:36 PM   #1
Andrew Gray
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What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

I'm just curious why it is that we become "immune" to Rhabdo after doing CF for a while. At first glance it seems it's because CF is something new for our body and it can't handle it, but then once we get used to it the body adapts. Upon further thought though, one of the key points to CF is that it's always changing things up, always trying to shock the body with something new. If this is the case, shouldn't we still be in danger of getting Rhabdo? Obviously the answer is no because we don't get Rhabdo, but just thinking out loud and curious if anyone had some info on this. What physiological adaptation takes place that causes this change?

I thought about putting this in the injuries forum but seeing as I'm more concerned with what aspect of fitness is being trained that makes us Rhabdo resistant, I felt it fit better in the fitness forum.
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Old 05-26-2008, 10:07 PM   #2
Skylar Cook
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

Yes, you're still shocking the body, but the intensity is the same. I believe it's the body getting used to the high power/work output of CF. Many, if not all, of the WODs involve complex movements that recruit most of the muscle groups in a single workout. We're shocking the body by not preforming the same routine day after day, but we're still getting bigger, stronger, faster, etc. Intensity is key. If you're sedentary, pushing yourself to your limits will, literally, cause your muscles to break down because they're not used to the stress. I don't know if I can pin down one single adaptation, but I believe it's comprable to muscular growth.


Edit: Reading over that I realize how little sense it made. Time for bed! Hope that helped somehow.
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Old 05-26-2008, 10:31 PM   #3
Frank E Morel
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

part of the article that explains rhabdo.

Can you train and compete in a way which minimises the risk of rhabdomyolysis? Studies are scanty in this area but suggest that as fitness improves and an athlete's training programme becomes more challenging and of longer duration, the likelihood of rhabdo declines.
....
wfs if you wish to read it.
http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/...omyolysis.html
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Old 05-26-2008, 11:53 PM   #4
Steven Low
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

By building up the work capacity of the muscles. Mostly durability to eccentrics. Eccentric loading tends to add sarcomeres to myofibrils which can ultimately take more stress without tearing apart the muscle fibers.
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Old 05-27-2008, 02:07 AM   #5
Randy Tarasevich
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

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Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
By building up the work capacity of the muscles. Mostly durability to eccentrics. Eccentric loading tends to add sarcomeres to myofibrils which can ultimately take more stress without tearing apart the muscle fibers.
That's pretty cool. Makes sense.
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Old 05-27-2008, 06:53 AM   #6
Christian Mason
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank E Morel View Post
part of the article that explains rhabdo.

Can you train and compete in a way which minimises the risk of rhabdomyolysis? Studies are scanty in this area but suggest that as fitness improves and an athlete's training programme becomes more challenging and of longer duration, the likelihood of rhabdo declines.
....
wfs if you wish to read it.
http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/...omyolysis.html
It's worth noting that the sports injury bulletin article linked above claims female humans are immune to rhabo, which is completely incorrect. This is also dangerous misinformation.

My girlfriend is still recovering from a combination of Rhabo and compartment syndrome.
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Old 05-27-2008, 07:08 AM   #7
Rayna McGinnis
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank E Morel View Post
part of the article that explains rhabdo.

....
wfs if you wish to read it.
http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/...omyolysis.html
I was reading this link over and noticed that it states that women are immune to Rhabdo. I'm not sure how old the research is, but this is something that was for a long time believed, but is not the case.

( I assume because women did not engage in activities that caused rhabdo nearly as often?? not sure)

As a recent FEMALE rhabdo victim, I know this for a fact and felt the need to point it out. While doing my research on Rhabdo, I find that when I read something like that, I tend to feel that the writer isn't doing their homework and that the source is unreliable (at least partially if not completely) as it's listing incorrect information.

On the other hand- If anyone has any links on the healing processes of Rhabdo, I'd be interested in reading those. I haven't been able to find any. At least not on rectus abdominus rhabdomyolysis.

-Rayna
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Old 05-27-2008, 07:09 AM   #8
Rayna McGinnis
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

okay- he beat me to my point. sorry to recap.
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Old 05-27-2008, 07:43 AM   #9
Andres Diaz
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Re: What adaptation prevents Rhabdo?

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Originally Posted by Andrew Gray View Post
What physiological adaptation takes place that causes this change?
I think it has something to do with metabolic pathways, the glycotic transfers to the others and there is really no such a big difference between the hundred movements we perform, as they all break down into push/pull round some joint.
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