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Old 06-22-2006, 08:06 PM   #1
Sage Burgener
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[face=verdana,arial,helvetica][/face]So i have had tendinitis for like 4 and a half months now. TOTAL BUST. I know that icing and anti-inflammatories and stuff are suppose to be the only cures, but is rest mandatory? Of course im not resting the wrist a lot...I'm a Burgener, its not possible to keep me out of the gym. But, can tendinitis become worse if it isnt allowed rest, or is it one of those things that you can work through? }
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Old 06-22-2006, 08:55 PM   #2
Joseph Hart
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4 months...Man that must suck. From some of the posts tendonitis can become a chronic thing. Christian Lemburg has some good stuff with trigger points and tendonitis. I have tendonitis in my elbow and tried some of his suggestions. It seems to help. So maybe there is something that would work for you. He has an article in a CFJ not sure which one. I have been icing right after the WOD and about 2 more times a day. Matt G had acupuncture done for tendonitis and it worked. You could do contrast soaking in buckets. One with icewater and the other with hot (really warm?) water. Switch back and forth and end with the cold. Jim at Beastskills has a little article about it.

You might really want to give yourself a break and let it heal. It just takes longer when you get older. I turned 36 and it seemed like everything fell apart.

This could be a chance to back squat into oblivion:lol:
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Old 06-23-2006, 05:17 AM   #3
Elliot Royce
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I'm sure you'll get a response from one of our experts but I'm almost an expert on tendonitis given all the different places I've had it. A few random comments:

yes, it can become chronic if you don't treat it. Scar tissue can form and you can be forced to eventually have an operation. On the other hand, you can sometimes work through it. I would say it depends on the level of pain. If you've had it for 4 months, you need to take care of it because it's unlikely to go away on its own. Have you seen a good orthopedist?

I found acupuncture to be very helpful. Also, ART (active release technique). There are stretches you can do yourself which a PT can show you. You can also get a cortisone shot, which my doctor believes will eliminate the inflammation at little risk of damaging the tendon. This won't remove the underlying cause, just the pain for a while. If your technique or muscle strength or flexibility is inadequate, the problem will recur. Some people argue strongly against cortisone shots.

You mention your wrist so I'll assume that's where the problem is. An orthopedist can make you a wrist brace which will keep your wrist in a position that prevents stressing the tendons. It may also prevent you from doing the lift but that's the point: giving that tendon a break. It's also helpful at night when you sleep since sometimes wrist problems are tied to your hand and arm being in strange positions when you sleep.

If this is from front squats, then I would guess your forearm muscles are tight. Stretching 4-5x per day is important. Ice after exercise. Moist heat a couple of times per day. Maximum ibuprofen. And give it two weeks off completely just to see what happens.

(Message edited by eroyce on June 23, 2006)
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Old 06-23-2006, 06:16 AM   #4
Jerimiah Childress
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You can work through it, you just can't do any work that agrivates or causes the inflammation. You almost never want to do complete rest as in not doing anything, but you don't want to take the joint to end range, no fast stabilization movements, and nothing that causes pain. Lots of gentle pain free range of motion, with gradual introduction of weight and slow ramp up to normal activity. In a young person like yourself with the proper rest and Ice 2 - 4 weeks should be the max. If your good about your rest and it still isn't going away you will definately want to get it checked out, if not sooner.
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Old 06-23-2006, 08:47 AM   #5
Christian Lemburg
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Hi folks,

the trigger point article is in CFJ 37, Sep 2005 - see http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/27/14941.html for a summary of it with links to resources.

Good luck, and fast recovery,

Christian
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Old 06-23-2006, 12:18 PM   #6
Sage Burgener
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Thanks everyone!!!
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Old 06-23-2006, 05:52 PM   #7
James Hall
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Sage,
Tough break with that one. I'll throw my $.02 in. The inflammatory cycle lasts approximately 21 days and is necessary for healing. We all heal by scarring. Once the cycle is complete, it's necessary to begin remodelling the tissue. It's now tendinosis, not inflammatory. So you begin to stress it again. The symptoms will flare, but should not last longer than 20-30 minutes, then settle back to baseline. Any longer than that and it's being stressed too much (damage). Any shorter and it's not being optimally stressed. Ice is your friend and let the abnormally healed tissue dictate the pace of recovery.
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Old 06-23-2006, 10:15 PM   #8
Paul Alvarez
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Calisthenics helped me out along with the prescribed methods(ice/warm, nsaid's, stretching, no shots or acupuncture though, bengay-does it help anyone else out?, wraps and braces, self triggerpoint massage)
And adjusting my diet helped too(nightshades)
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Old 07-03-2006, 06:05 PM   #9
Tim Boyd
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The first time I posted, I asked for help with a herniated disk. I was encouraged by a person here to continue to train and do exercised that decompressed my spine and strengthened my core. Primarily my abdominal and lower back areas. I cannot tell you how exciting it was for me that it worked completely. I have absolutely zero pain in my back and my fitness level has sky rocketed. THANK YOU to whoever helped me. You can't know what an impact it has had on me. I have begun to train in Krav Maga and have been boxing and doing ground fighting with a group of good guys. However, recently while holding mits for another boxer, something gave in my elbow area and it feels like a tendon. I have lost strength and speed in that arm and although it seems to be healing, the progress is slow. Should I let it heal without training or is this also something I should train through. The injury was the result of the opposing boxer's punch and when my arm absorbed that impact is when the pain started. I really appreciate any advice that anyone can offer.
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Old 07-04-2006, 09:00 AM   #10
Elliot Royce
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As a frequent sufferor from tendonitis, I know how frustrating it is: it is rarely painful enough to really stop you from exercising and yet it never goes away.

I think the textbook answer is to back off any activities that create significant pain but to keep the affected area mobile, so that blood circulation and flexibility is maintained. Usually there is something you can do. Right now, I've had golfer's elbow for 2 months brought on by incorrect ring dips. I can't do dips, can't do bench press, but I can do pushups using the handles and I can do dumbbell bench presses (at a light weight). You just need to find the right combination.

I'm also trying the trigger point therapy that someone recommended in another post. It's early days but I can definitely feel the sore spots, often in areas that I never would have expected.
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