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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 05-27-2003, 12:22 PM   #1
Robert Wolf
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Coach,Dan, Nick-

Any thoughts on advantages of one vs another (split/power jerk)?

I have been tinkering with the Power Jerk and although I am not up to the poundage I can do in the split is feels pretty good and it seems easier for sub maximal/high rep work outs. Also on the split I tend to alternate after every rep for ballance.

Thanks!
Robb
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Old 05-28-2003, 07:55 AM   #2
Dan John
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I like the idea of alternating the front foot during reps, if you have the ability.

One thing about splitting is that it seems to be easier on the lower back. As one push jerks (even an advanced lifter) there is a tendency for the lower back to get crashed. Catching jerks is tough at any level when you let the bar come down...you really have to cushion your knees and let it come down...but catching push jerks is often down with a backward lean at the top lockout.

With the split, there is a natural feel to pushing the chest through the arms and taking the weight with the legs and hips.

I did a Strongman contest where we could do "anyhow" with a 3 inch axle weighing about 145 pounds. I did split jerks...hard to catch with that diameter...but got 31 reps. The next day, I didn't feel it in my back (but my triceps!!!) and I think it was because the split naturally puts you in a better place.

If you are a combat athlete, the split might be better (especially with your alternating) as it would mimic the needs of lunging for something like a single leg takedown. For a thrower, it also gets you into the throwing position.

I like push jerks and push presses, but rarely does a novice do them right. Split Jerks are a touch more complicated on recovery (bring your front foot back first), but seem to do less damage to the lifter.

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Old 05-28-2003, 11:29 AM   #3
Scott Parker
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so which one should we use for WOD's?

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Old 05-28-2003, 11:38 AM   #4
Scott Parker
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is a push-jerk just a clean with a push-press to finish, or is it more like a thruster after the initial clean and you're at the bottom of the squat?

scott
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Old 05-28-2003, 02:23 PM   #5
David Wood
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Scott:

As I understand it (and I hope someone will correct me if I've got it wrong):

Imagine that you've cleaned a nice sensible weight and have it comfortably in front of you.

If you just press it overhead without any bending at the the knees or hip, that's a "press".

If you bend slightly at the knees, then snap/drive the knees back to straight (using the quadriceps and hip extensors) to get the weight moving, and press it out to finish, that's a "push press".

If you bend and straighten at the knee (as above), but when you start to press the weight you ALSO do a second (deeper) knee bend to lower your body beneath the weight (which makes it easier to get to straight arms overhead), that's a "push jerk".

If you just have the weight in front of you, and drive it overhead with just arm strength AND the second drop down of the previous example, that's a "jerk" (this one I'm not sure of).

The differences between the "push jerk" and the "jerk" are pretty subtle . . . mostly having to do with how much impetus upwards you give the bar from the initial knee-bend-and-straighten. That drive starts moving the bar upwards while it is still against your chest (before the arms enter the game). The more of that there is in the lift, the more it shades over to a "push jerk" from just a regular "jerk". The former latter is dominated by the initial push as the major element of getting the bar overhead, the latter by the is dominated by the second dropping down of the body.

Of course, it's entirely possible that I'm full of crap on this distinction. If so, I won't mind being told so.


Dave
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Old 05-28-2003, 07:16 PM   #6
Robert Wolf
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David-

You are right on with the exception of the last bit about the jerk w/o a knee beend to initiate...the knee bend with the drop to catch is a jerk. A jerk is typically a load in which the arms act to lock the weight over head. They provide virtually not upward force.

One can land in a split (split jerk), a 1/4-1/2 squat (power jerk) or a full squat (squat jerk...pretty damn rare).

BTW- Thanks Dan! Just the info I was searching for.
Robb
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