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Old 11-20-2009, 05:09 PM   #11
Michael Pilhofer
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

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Originally Posted by Mark Griffith View Post
I do beleive that scalling is being done correctly.
My broader concern is how the behavior affects the rest of the class.
I don't mean any disrespect Mark but can you give more detail on a specific WOD and scale you used on said athlete that either DNF or broke down? Those seem like extreme by-products of a WOD.

I have a client who is "needy" to say the least. One thing that has worked for me is to over pay attention to them...but stay 100% smiles and positive. "Great Job!" "Keep it going, almost there!!" etc..etc..so forth.

I will also pair them up with another very positive and non-fire breather for them to "work-with" That really helped on some heavy lifting days when this "needy" client was able to keep up a bit on the weight with this other athlete I paired her with. She was able to learn while watching, and not feel completely lame with the weight she was lifting as compared to the others.

I think there needs to be a PSYC degree CERT, as so much of what we do on a daily basis is coach and train the person. Knowing my clients, establishing a 100% open, learning, respectful environment helps a ton.
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Old 11-20-2009, 07:07 PM   #12
Frank DiMeo
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

Mark--
Keep it safe, but remember it's your gym and you run it.
Scaling can be a little tricky in the beginning, and you'll get the hang of it as time goes on.
When I start new clients, I explain to them that I expect them to work hard at my gym and that we don't allow whining.
I have 3 "No whining "signs in the gym in plain sight, which I point out to them from day 1.
I also let them know that they will get the results if the do the work, there are no short cuts.
There is a globo gym about 200 yards away from me, and I make sure that they came to the right place (say it with a smile). If they want an easy, sweatless workout they head over there with no hard feelings.
Don't allow them to take over your training sessions with wussy attitudes.
Lay the groundwork of your expectations of them right in the beginning.
Many people need scaling in the beginning, and that's fine. Move them up when they are readfy.
Also, don't let people scale endlessly. If they've been there a reasonable length of time, nudge them towards the WOD "as RX'd" as soon as you can safely do so.
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Old 11-20-2009, 08:06 PM   #13
Peter Evans
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

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Originally Posted by Frank DiMeo View Post
Mark--
Keep it safe, but remember it's your gym and you run it.
Scaling can be a little tricky in the beginning, and you'll get the hang of it as time goes on.
When I start new clients, I explain to them that I expect them to work hard at my gym and that we don't allow whining.
I have 3 "No whining "signs in the gym in plain sight, which I point out to them from day 1.
I also let them know that they will get the results if the do the work, there are no short cuts.
There is a globo gym about 200 yards away from me, and I make sure that they came to the right place (say it with a smile). If they want an easy, sweatless workout they head over there with no hard feelings.
Don't allow them to take over your training sessions with wussy attitudes.
Lay the groundwork of your expectations of them right in the beginning.
Many people need scaling in the beginning, and that's fine. Move them up when they are readfy.
Also, don't let people scale endlessly. If they've been there a reasonable length of time, nudge them towards the WOD "as RX'd" as soon as you can safely do so.
Completely agree. I take the approach that you'll be treated as you let people treat you.

Humans are trainable, like dogs and small children. Let them know your expectations and why they are important to your gym community's success, then be consistent with this message and one of two things may happen.

Client goes "Oh well can't be bothered! I'll leave!" great you've just strengthened your resolve and lived up to your high standards - and in doing so attracted more like-minded clients.

Second outcome, Client says, "Ok, I understand I need a better strategy for coping with the WOD etc"

With my clients, from the get go, I explain there are no lazy people in our community, only those that work to be better than before they turned up to a session. I make it clear that hard work is standard - not optional BUT the rewards are unparalleled.
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Old 11-20-2009, 09:33 PM   #14
Joey Powell
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

I don't play their games. They play mine.
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Old 11-21-2009, 03:59 AM   #15
Blair Robert Lowe
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

One of the things they teach us in ECE is that children need higher success rates when doing new things but as they progress in their ability to do a thing and other things linked to that initial thing their success rate can be less.

However, if we want good, efficient movement and to develop self-confidence their needs to be a high success rate when it comes to non/in-experienced athletes.

You don't have to worry about this with more advanced or experienced athletes unless they have become wusses. Then you will need to just break out the whip.

I consider a beginning athlete no matter what the age to be the same. Whether they are 3, 13, 33, or 63. Inexperienced or weak is literally the same boat.

This can be often very true with those adults who never were active until adulthood or are starting out. However, if they did have experience with some endeavor perhaps besides athletics, there could be some crossover (dance, music, art, etc).
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Old 11-21-2009, 08:30 PM   #16
John C. Brown
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

I would say that first of all, if they have the capacity to speak in more that one or two word grunts, then they aren't working. I find this to be a good basis for intensity. In other words, even my 73-75 year old ladies complete waaaaay scaled down work outs (by the way, it seems like you get the scaling concept, no reason to kick the horse again) following this unstated rule.

I am also of the opinion that they really do care, so for a lot of them what I might say is something like this "it's okay, you did as well as you could today, tomorrow is another opportunity to come back and try harder." A lot of times people are unaware of their adaptations. So you may also want to bring up that they may have been incapable of completing even as much as they did as little as a month previous.

Finally, I don't think that I have had more than one or two people in three years DNF. You need to find a way to empower them to rise to the challenge, so long as what you do to enable that doesn't undermine the work that the rest of the gym is putting in. Good Luck, I know how hard these issues are to work through.
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Old 11-21-2009, 09:36 PM   #17
Mark Griffith
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

You gus are giving great responses. Thx!
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Old 11-21-2009, 10:19 PM   #18
Mark E. Wallace
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

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I don't play their games. They play mine.
Well, there ya go, Mark. That should be all you need to know right there.
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Old 11-25-2009, 11:28 AM   #19
Kurt Sarkela
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

I have some females that get teary eyed. I just push them through like it never happened. Get used to the intensity and hard work. Most have never had to put out that kind of effort in life. I don't know what else to do?? What if it becomes a standard for certain female athletes??
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Old 11-25-2009, 07:57 PM   #20
Amy Crawford
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Re: Clients with extreme moods in the WOD

I've never had anyone DNF a workout, other than from injury. At first, I scale a lot, planting the seed of success. Then we quickly increase weight/reps/intensity, and things change.

I also make it very clear, from the get-go, that this stuff is hard, and the best results come from hard work. It it were easy, everyone would do it. I expect 100%, for that day, from everyone. 100% may vary from day to day for everyone - sleep, diet, recovery, life stressors all play a role - but you've got to give it all. I understand that different people express their "discomfort" in different ways, but if it's annoying and distracting to other clients, I'll have a chit-chat about it. That's not always fun, but it's part of the job description!

I've gotten teary a couple of times, but not distractingly so, and for me it's usually from frustration at my perceived inability to get the work accomplished. If you weren't looking right at me, you wouldn't have noticed. Remember, this stuff is hard, and going in to the pain cave can be challenging. Now, if someone's blubbering/sobbing in the corner, that's different. Mostly likely, CF isn't for that person.
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