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Old 10-11-2008, 11:52 PM   #1
Kayne Tumahai
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Talking Going Dizzy

Lately when going heavy on deadlifts i'll get this full on dizzy sensation. Any body else experience this ? And if so anyone know why it happens, if its real bad, how to deal with it. I do use the valsalva manouvre, but the breathe is only held for a few seconds, maybe 6 sec. in total.
Any comments appreciated, cheers.
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Old 10-12-2008, 08:48 AM   #2
Justin Lascek
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Re: Going Dizzy

My understanding this is normal when first getting accustomed to the Vasalva. I've experienced this, as well as my friends.

Keep on using it because it's necessary for protection and strength. If you want more information, or have more complicated questions, hit up Mark Rippetoe's forum on Strength Mill (Google "Rippetoe Q&A").
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Old 10-12-2008, 12:05 PM   #3
Blair Robert Lowe
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Re: Going Dizzy

Heavy BS or DL are so intense they do things like this besides causing nosebleeds which are common or light headed-ness.

I think it has to do with the intensity and how it pumps the blood around.
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Old 10-12-2008, 05:16 PM   #4
Erin Davidson
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Re: Going Dizzy

I definitely experience this - especially on Deads. I'm not sure what to do about it either - but I'm going to experiment with letting out my breath a bit more during the effort and between reps (I think I'm just filling up and keeping all that air in and I've heard that can cause this kind of thing...). The crazy thing is it's definitely the greater level of effort or something in the movement itself that causes it because I can stay upside down without too much dizziness for way longer than a deadlift takes me. Hm, on second thought, I'm probably breathing more readily in a handstand than in something like a max effort dead. I'll let you know if I find anything out...
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Old 10-12-2008, 07:26 PM   #5
Derek Maffett
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Re: Going Dizzy

Try hissing out some of your breath. You keep tension because it's a forceful hiss rather than a simple release of air. Helps avoid light-headedness, passing out, and spontaneous cranial explosions.
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Old 10-12-2008, 10:57 PM   #6
Blair Robert Lowe
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Re: Going Dizzy

Which is very similar to an Iron Body training technique in many martial arts, Derek.
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Old 10-13-2008, 02:52 AM   #7
Derek Maffett
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Re: Going Dizzy

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Originally Posted by Blair Robert Lowe View Post
Which is very similar to an Iron Body training technique in many martial arts, Derek.
Are you referring to "KIYAH!" or to spontaneous cranial explosions?
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Old 10-13-2008, 04:00 AM   #8
Kayne Tumahai
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Talking Re: Going Dizzy

Thanks for the response, hey justin thanks for the tip off to rip, the guy should run for president. I do hold the breathe from bottom to top back to bottom again. I've been considering to try take another breathe at the top instead. Any comments.
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Old 10-13-2008, 11:54 AM   #9
Derek Maffett
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Re: Going Dizzy

No, just hiss out the breath a little. You don't want to be actually "breathing" because you'll loosen up. You should be able to get all the breath you need for the rep at the unloaded bottom position (when you're safe). Even with squats, I seem to remember Rippetoe saying that you should just "top off" your breath at the standing position, not big exhales and inhales. With the deadlift, you get to go one rep at a time, though, so it seems you shouldn't have to take any breath at lockout.
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Old 10-13-2008, 01:31 PM   #10
Blair Robert Lowe
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Re: Going Dizzy

No, not Kiai. Kiai when taught to beginners and most systems is used as a training tool to make sure the student is expelling air out upon striking. It's also used as a mental tool to put out a lot of intention. A lot of Japanese sensei will sometimes say Kiai really is similar to American like grunting or screaming when working out or saying F-you for rape training, etc.

In Chinese and Okinawan iron body training, you hiss out the air slowly between 5 and 15 seconds, say. Just depends on how air is being hissed at a time (volume/time). This is also as you are being kicked, punched, slapped, or while holding training jars for grip training or in stance training, etc.

In breathing circles, it's considered very "yang," rather positive breath. Basically we are trying to expel as much CO2 as possible to keep the body going. At times, one may concentrate on making each intake as long as possible, increasing O2 stores and exhale only shortly or do long intake, long exhale. It all depends.

For most exertion of rapid force, the air is exhaled with a high volume, but with force over time, it's exhaled kind of like a bike tire loosing air if you press the little guage. Maybe not even that fast.

Positive breath also keeps the insides of the body tight ( muscle-wise ) in case you get struck. It's not fun to get struck when holding air inside the body. Basically, getting your breath knocked out. I remember we generally said to start off with 80% capacity and not breathe till around 20% capacity. That way we weren't full nor were we out of air.

And eventually, if you get into...kiai is no longer an externalized sound. It's still external but becomes silent. As far as ringing bells and validity, I dunno since there is a popular video of a kiai sensei in Japan getting his arse handed to him by a Kyokushinkai guy in a match. Remember kiai means to bring together the spirit but eventually it's thought to throw out the spirit/intention.
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