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Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

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Old 06-21-2004, 01:57 PM   #1
Scott Parker
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yes, the title of this thread is true. about a week ago i decided to experiment and add bread back into my diet. i did this because i did not feel that i was getting enough carbohydrates in each day. i tried experimenting by adding more fruit, but this just led to gaining extra body fat, and getting hungry again after eating the fruit.

from what i can tell so far the bread gives me a more sustained feeling of fullness (spelt bread if you are curious). also i have been supplementing my diet with sweet potatoes for a while and this has seemed to work well also.

i have also been eating dairy, especially cheese.

i guess you can say i am no longer paleo! it's wierd because when i first started crossfit i followed a very strict paleo diet and over about eight or nine months gained about 8 lbs, all muscle. but since then i have been stuck at this weight, and from time to time even lose a few pounds.

since making these modifications in my diet i have gained maybe a pound or two, but still maintain a bodyfat of anywhere between 7 - 8.5%, and feel pretty good. not woozy feelings, or rebound hypoglycemia. i accucheck myself randomly throughout the day and everything is excellent (i'm usually in the high 90's).

so my question is should i really be concerned about adding the bread back into my diet? part of me thinks that this really isn't much of an issue, especially when you take my body weight and type into consideration. i'm tall, 6'2", 28 years old, and thin, weighing only about 170 - 172 on a good day, with a crazy fast metabolism.

i believe that part of the reason that i would lose a pound every once in a while was because i was so strict about my diet. if i had to choose between eating a piece of bread because it was the only thing around or nothing because i was eating paleo, i wouldn't eat. that's how strict i was, but now with a hectic schedule (class during the day, externship in the ED at night, and working on an ambulance on the weekends), time is tight and it's hard to prepare all my meals like i used to.

just curious what other people think of this decision. it looks like now i am leaning more toward zone style of eating. i've read enter the zone, and heard mention of an athelete's zone. is this book available or has it not been published yet?

any comments, suggestions, help is welcome and appreciated! thanks in advance!

scott
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Old 06-21-2004, 02:18 PM   #2
Brian Hand
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Scott, I am curious what kinds of fruit you were eating in the first place, and how much of your daily carbohydrate intake came from fruit. I have been searching around for fructose information and wondering if there is a practical limit to how much you can handle per day.

I have been trying to figure out other sources of low glycemic carbs that fit my taste and very limited tolerance for slaving over a hot stove. So far, butternet squash has been working. I can bake up a couple of these on the weekend, scoop the meat out and store it in the refrigerator, and eat it a cup at a time, cold or reheated. The glycemic index is medium, it is a moderate serving of carbs, high in fiber, high in carotenoids, seems pretty good all around.

In any event, it is hard to argue with success. You were on the strict paleolithic diet long enough to adjust, and it sounds like you're in great condition and feel better with the current diet. I say declare victory and celebrate with a sandwich.
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Old 06-21-2004, 02:40 PM   #3
Scott Parker
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brian-

i was consuming apples and pears only, and just started adding in peaches because they are now in season. was getting the rest of my carbs from sweet potatoes and leafy greens - spinach, kale, collards. also eat a fair amount of yellow swuash, so i'll give the butternut a shot!

thanks for your input!

scott
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Old 06-23-2004, 03:47 AM   #4
Sean Harrison
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Good for you! Don't feel guilty and don't let anyone give you **** about your haircut either! ( that's a line from The Fugitive)
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Old 06-23-2004, 05:02 AM   #5
Sebastian
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I have been reading a book by Weston Price. In it he goes around a visits a bunch of people who live with virtually no contact with "civilization" and examines what they eat. He is a dentist by trade so he is mainly looking at cavities and dental arches. I am only about half way through but so far it seems like the people who live in isolation have far better health than those who eat the modern foods. The point I am getting to is that he found a very isolated village in the mountains of Switzerland who had a main staple of rye bread in their diet. Of course it is natural with no preservatives, high fructose corn syrup, naturally raised and harvested rye, etc. But these people live very well with few cavities, great physical condition, and good dental arches by eating rye bread. I guess what I am trying to say is whole grain, natural bread may not be so bad.
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Old 06-23-2004, 08:47 AM   #6
Ross Hunt
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Sebastian,

What's the name of Price's book? I'm familiar with the website, and I wasn't quite persuaded by all that the articles there had to say; I'd love to hear it from the horse's mouth.

Thanks,

Ross Hunt
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Old 06-23-2004, 09:30 AM   #7
Sebastian
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The book is called "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration." It really is an interesting book and very well researched. This guy travelled all around the world doing his studies. The cheapest place I found to buy it was:

http://www.alldirect.com/book.asp?isbn=0879838167

Some of the bigger bookstores don't carry it in stock and say 2 to 3 weeks or some nonsense to ship.

Good luck with it.
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Old 06-23-2004, 08:55 PM   #8
Jay Edvardz
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Ross,

I highly recommend Dr. Price's work. It's both fascinating and enlightening. If you have some money to spend, I'd also suggest purchasing Nourishing Traditions (far more than a cookbook) by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig and Pottenger's Cats (an extremely informative book demonstrating the deleterious effects caused by faulty nutrition). You may also want to check out: www.price-pottenger.com many great articles.

-Jay
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Old 06-26-2004, 08:25 AM   #9
Ross Hunt
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Sebsatian, Jay,

Thanks. It's in the mail.

Ross Hunt
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