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Old 05-23-2007, 05:53 PM   #1
Thomas Covington
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I am currently looking for a new house and one of my requirements(much to my wife's dislike) has been to have a garage with a flat floor. However it seems as those are in short supply here. The best that I can find is a grade of 2"/10'. Does anyone know how detrimental would this small grade be to lifting and what are the options for making a platform that would be elevated at one end to make a flat suface?
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Old 05-23-2007, 07:50 PM   #2
Paul Findley
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I just elevated my platform. I used left over chunks of 1/4 & 1/2 inch plywood and 1/8 fiberboard to approximate the angle. Mine came out to about 1/8" every 12 inches.

The biggest problem with the slant was the weights would slowly roll away.

It was easy to level the platform. I would focus on finding a 3 car garage :-), with a slant.
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Old 05-24-2007, 12:48 AM   #3
Adam Noble
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The garage I am in now has a pretty good slant to it, mildly irritating at times, but mostly harmless. I just put a bunch of unused iron plates at the end of the stall mats I am lifting on to prevent runaway barbells. When deadlifting, once the weight gets heavy enough, the barbell doesn't roll anyway.
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Old 05-24-2007, 06:32 AM   #4
Karin Jonczak
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I would hope you can't find a garage without a slant!! If you do, I would run from that house fast; what kind of builder pours a slab without a slant!?? especially in a garage.

I bet, with a little creativity, you could build a square frame, isolate it from the garage floor with a tarp and pour cement into it to create a flat surface for lifting. A surface that you can remove if you ever leave so that the garage drains properly.

kk
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Old 05-24-2007, 08:54 AM   #5
John Vernon
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Thomas don't fret. I just went through an almost identical situation with my apartment garage.

My measurements were -3.5"/16' (back to front). I took 2x4x16's and ripped them down diagonally to make my shims for leveling the floor (quite tricky to get exact due to the nature of this cut but good enough). I laid out my shims 16" O.C. to make screwing off the ply easy and to make the floor foundation real strong. Now I used liquid nails subfloor to glue the bottoms of the shims to the garage floor but that's only because I have a penchant for the overkill. Regular silicone adhesive will work well and cleans up much easier if you move. since there is basically nothing to screw the plywood deck onto at the back of the garage, skinny end of the shim, I used liquid nails on top of the shims as well to get a nice bond to the ply. Set all the weight you have on this area to ensure a good cure.

For decking I used 1 1/8" T&G Plywood, PLENTY strong and much less time than laying down a bunch of sheets of 3/4", and there is only a 5/16" difference in the thickness of the two. T&G makes up for this small discrepency. I laid the sheets down width-wise back to front. Regular drywall screws to screw it off.

After that, put down some horse stall mats and bingo, you'll have a nice level floor.

OR, going off of what Karin said. I would recomend Ardex in lieu of actually pouring new cement over existing. You'll have to scarify (rough up) the existing surface before you lay this stuff down. But if you're looking to purchase I recommend this method, especially if the slope angle is small and you've got an unlevel surface back-to-front & side-to-side.

IMO, even the smallest angle in a floor can be detrimental to lifting.
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Old 05-24-2007, 09:38 AM   #6
Roger Smith
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I try to change directions I'm lifting in. IE one week face north, then south etc. That way any unbalance will be corrected over time. My garage is all over the place cracked in many places and very old....
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Old 05-24-2007, 10:50 AM   #7
Timothy Roehr
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You can also frame your lifting platform with 2x4's to solve the weight rolling away problem.
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Old 05-24-2007, 02:18 PM   #8
Thomas Covington
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Thanks guys.

I believe I will go the first route that John mentioned, I am just dreading cutting 4-5 struts at that length on angle.
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