CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Injuries
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Injuries Chronic & Acute

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-29-2009, 05:58 AM   #21
Neal Carlson
Member Neal Carlson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Dunellen  NJ
Posts: 43
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

Jeff,
I'm eager to read about your next update.

Jason,
Visit the NUCCA website there is a doctor search function.

I've had scrolliosis since they tested for it in middle school or so (now 35). I've had occassional back pain for 10 years now - but it has been worse now that I'm trying to do starting strength. To the point that I'm taking a break from squats/deadlifts. My form is good, so I'm not ready to give up squatting just because my back is "bad". And I consider it stupid to continue to squat regularly and get pain regularly.

I'm skeptical about NUCCA, but can't imagine it would make things worse. Afterall - it looks like they do nothing. So I think I'll setup an appt with a doctor about an hour away. I'll be sure to post feedback here.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2009, 11:09 AM   #22
Mike Mallory
Member Mike Mallory is offline
 
Mike Mallory's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 694
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

The Nucca will help with underlying issues, but if your scoliosis is caused by deformed vertebrae, there isn't much changing it.

NUCCA will defintiely help, I've seen VERY scoliotic spines come straight after one session...........And like you said, it can't hurt. However, it's not an 'end all', you still need to be able to use your muscles (stabilizers AND prime movers) effectively, which the NUCCA Doc won't be able to help you with. Just another piece in the puzzle. good luck
__________________
Foam rollers suck!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 11:23 AM   #23
Jeff Evans
Member Jeff Evans is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Baltimore  MD
Posts: 296
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

This morning, I had my 3rd follow appointment since the adjustment (which was on Sep. 2, exactly 30 days ago). It appears to be holding, and I am cautiously optimistic. I won't be giving a ringing, unequivocal endorsement if and until my back feels like 90% better (as is claimed). However, I do think things are moving in the right direction, which is indescribably exciting after almost 3 years of frustrating constant, albeit not debilitating, pain.

First, a fair & balanced™ assessment of my experience so far:

Dislikes:
  • There's a certain seedy user car lot feel to things. The doc talks a lot about satisfaction guarantees and getting your money back if you're not satisfied. Also says he'll give my brother/cousin/friend $100 off their treatment if I bring them in, etc. Of course on the surface these are good things, but the cynic in me associates them with shadiness.
  • To put it bluntly, some aspects of his technique are not objective. The main problem I have here is that every follow up, the doc insists he "has to write down something", meaning making a note of some symptom that has improved. There problems with this are hopefully clear.
  • Unclear communication on timelines/expectations for results. When I first contacted the doctor, it was "we'll have you fixed on your first visit," then "the healing process will take some time," and finally, "we don't care much what happens in the first month anyway." Of course it's completely understandable that a concrete answer to "when will my back feel better?" is impossible to give since every case is different, etc. But it would have been nice if this was made a little more clear up front - you're getting the adjustment then over a period of weeks/months you will gradually but steadily heal.
  • No focus whatsoever on physical rehabilitation/next steps. Just a vague promise that "when the brain controls the body better, the body will heal itself" (paraphrasing). What about retraining? Which muscles are likely to need attention as the spine adjusts? What exercise should I avoid to prevent losing the adjustment? These are the kinds of questions I have a hard time getting answered. However, I think there are many NUCCA docs who are also trained in sports medicine/PT, so it's certainly possible to find one of these (will probably want to e-mail them first to discuss things).
  • The techniques used for assessing the adjustment seem somewhat flawed. For example, the merit of checking leg lengths in the supine position is, from what I understand, somewhat contested. Also, the laser level device used to check hip level/rotation is prone to bias since the doctor essentially sets it while he can clearly see the laser line on the wall (it's a bit difficult to feel whether it's really sitting evenly on the bones). Though, of course, the shoulder version, which is a completely independent piece that is set on the shoulder girdle, is almost certainly impossible to fake.

Likes:
  • The doctor is clearly very passionate about what he's doing. At the tender young age of 86 he sees patients 3 days a week and speaks excitedly about securing funding for upcoming research projects. Today he was mentioning that the Palmer School of Chiropractic received a large grant to attempt to replicate the results of the recent (and controversial) NUCCA hypertension study (w/fs). He's also apparently trying to keep the field vibrant by getting other chiros to learn NUCCA techniques, but not having as much success with that. He says part of the problem (beyond the skepticism, of course) is that most people (including chiros) lack of precise muscle control in the triceps/forearms required to do the adjustment. So he designed some kind of machine they can use to train these muscles; he showed me a prototype, and it was kind of interesting.
  • It's almost certainly not a scam. If it was, my doctor would have retired 30 or 40 years ago, bought a yacht, and moved to the Bahamas (he'd also be charging a lot more). At worst, it's a large scale placebo party.
  • It really does appear to be having a noticeable impact on my quality of life, in the positive direction. More on that below.

Now I'll mention some specific things I have noticed going on with body since the adjustment.
  • The whole sinus thing I noticed at first is still going on. Several days after the adjustment everything seemed completely dry, which was a nice contrast from the way things were before. But it still comes and goes over the course of a few days. Clearly, this observation is partly complicated by the fact that cold season is approaching.
  • The "twisting" sensation around by my tailbone that I described before is still happening. About a week after the adjustment it seemed to go away, but it definitely came back in the past 1.5 weeks or so. I think I described it as "clockwise from behind" before, but I'm not sure that's really a good description. Really it feels like my left leg is trying to force itself down but my muscles are resisting. This is probably a good thing as it may indicate that my body is working to correct my hip unleveling. I only get this feeling when standing up.
  • The cracking that led me to start this whole journey is slightly better . It's still going on but seems to be less frequent and the discomfort that drives me to twist/crack is lower. There used to be one really deep one I would regularly feel around T6-T7 when I tilted my head left, but that seems to no longer happen (upper thoracic and most of the cervical area still cracks though). Needless to say, that alone is very encouraging.
  • Sometimes, when I lay on my back I can't even feel anything at all, which is wonderful. It seems to vary day-by-day.
  • Sacral region felt a lot more flexible/less crabby during yoga this week (my first session since the adjustment). Haven't done anything with weights yet.
  • Standing still feels great, while sitting is mostly painful. But even the pain during sitting has been feeling somewhat better lately.
  • During the follow ups, my weight balance is totally out of whack (doc keeps telling me to "stand evenly" but it really feels like I am). I actually feel a little unsteady every time I get up from sitting and start walking around, which is odd. It seems to go away after walking for a bit though.
  • My energy levels are noticeably increased, probably closer to where they should be for a 25 year old dude who eats 85% paleo and exercises regularly. This is even more noteworthy considering that I've been cheating more lately in my diet and not getting nearly enough sleep (5-6 hours for the last week versus 7-8 before). Very excited to see whether this trend continues (doc says this is typically most prevalent after the first month).
  • My singing seems to be noticeably better (no, really ). Range and vocal quality are both improved. And it's not like I've been taking voice classes either...

I'll provide another update here later on. I just wanted to keep some detailed notes both for my own records as well as for the benefit of those who might be on the fence about trying this (as I was). Some day in the future (when I form something approaching a final conclusion), I'll also make a long post on my blog with all the information. In the meantime if you have any specific questions, you can reply here or PM me.
__________________
www.jeffevans.us (occasional bad language, otherwise w/fs)
Food log
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 11:52 AM   #24
Neal Carlson
Member Neal Carlson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Dunellen  NJ
Posts: 43
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

Thanks Jeff for the detailed follow up. I have an appt with a doc near me for Oct 16th. I'm very excited about this, heck even if I'm paying $$ for a placebo - I don't care. I plan to take pics of my curved spine before, and then I'll take more in the weeks after.


Did the doctor mention not to use weights? Or do you feel your body isn't ready for them? Or are you just being cautious?

Do you have any pictures before vs now?

You say sitting is painful - is it worse now than before the procedure?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 12:43 PM   #25
Mike Mallory
Member Mike Mallory is offline
 
Mike Mallory's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 694
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

Good to hear you're getting some relief Jeff!

A couple things to think about;

Nucca is not an end all! We have a lot of patients who have worked with Dr. Dicholtz, and the NUCCA I work with has also done a lot of work with him. There are a lot of doctors who think this type of work will unravel every problem you have if you just keep with it (Dickholtz being one of those); which is true to some extent, but not a very logical approach in my opinion. It's true that you must have the atlas balanced, or the other underlying structures won't stay in balance. It DOES solve a huge amount of problems, and I've seen some truly unbelieveable things happen after an sdjustment, so it is easy to understand why some practitioners can get a little ego behind 'em

Symptoms are not directly related because aligning the atlas is akin to fixing some kind of background architecture of a software program. Dural tension can affect so many structures because different parts of the spinal cord are affected with different people (everyone has a different way the atlas moves out of position).....make sense?

If you want objectivity, ask him to show you your X-rays. There is a small degree of error in checking hip level and supine leg exams, but realize that it is only a quick and simple way to check if the atlas is out of alignment. The nasium and vertex X-rays can prove the efficacy of the adjustment. Same with standing weight differentials, both are very accurate and almost imppossible to cheat.

I wouldn't count on your back getting better from NUCCA alone......In my experience, it just doesn't happen that way, but it is most definitely a big piece of the healing puzzle. As for muscle training, I wouldn't bother working with a NUCCA, as they usually don't know what their doing. Go to North Shore Smart Bodies for that.

cheers
__________________
Foam rollers suck!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2009, 06:53 PM   #26
Aaron Gainer
Member Aaron Gainer is offline
 
Aaron Gainer's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Macomb  MI
Posts: 693
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

Judging from personal experience, always make sure your neck, mid back, and lower back are strong. I say this because a weak link in one can affect the other. Stability exercises(isometrics mainly) are a big plus to getting back in the game.
__________________
B.S. Physical Education and Health
NSCA C.S.C.S, USAW Level 1
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2009, 12:21 PM   #27
Kulsoom Ahmed
Member Kulsoom Ahmed is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Atlanta  GA
Posts: 113
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

I am thinking to try at least one visit to an NUCCA. my problem has been on the right side, starting at the neck.

I dont know of anyone that has been to one in my city (atlanta)

I went to the directory and found there are three in my state. The one who is closest to me is also the only board certified one.

considering I have no referrals to this doc, is it worth giving a shot? They are out of network, and I think my out of network benefit is 70% coverage of the cost, first visit costs $130

Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 07:37 AM   #28
Neal Carlson
Member Neal Carlson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Dunellen  NJ
Posts: 43
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

I had my first visit last Friday with a NUCCA doc near me in NJ. He only took measurements and x-rays. They did not make any adjustments. They said that my atlas is displaced, and they thought that my problem is within their scope to help fix. But I have to go back for a second visit after they've "analyzed the data". Nothing wrong with that.

I think I wont get back there again for the follow up until 10/30. Overall, it still seems a bit hokey to me. Not the fact that my spine is not balanced and my muscles are in constant (but usually not painful) spasm, and that my atlas might be to blame. It just seems a bit odd that they can fix it so easily. But again - they haven't done anything yet. And in my case they didn't even specify what they think they can do for me.

The cost was $147 out of pocket for that visit and apparently the next. I don't know if that price includes the first adjustment. I should be able to get some reimbursed by my insurance, to be honest I don't know. But I'll have to pay cash and file the claims - they don't.

In my case, I don't mind spending the money with the potential to become healthier. I'm still skeptical and if money were a (major) factor I might think differently. But I've got nothing to lose.

Note that I'm not the type that goes to doctors often. In fact I almost never go. But I recently had a change of heart…. I went to a dermatologist for a minor case of psoriasis which I've had for literally a decade. He gave me a cream almost eliminated it in a week. In this case, my back is much more important that the psoriasis and therefore I think worth chance.

I'll post again after my next visit.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 04:08 PM   #29
Jeff Evans
Member Jeff Evans is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Baltimore  MD
Posts: 296
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

Answering some questions and posting an update (at the end)...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
Did the doctor mention not to use weights? Or do you feel your body isn't ready for them? Or are you just being cautious?
He never said I couldn't use weights. Just that I should be very careful for a while, particularly with my head and neck to avoid losing the adjustment (which I actually did, see my update at the end). I am making a personal choice to not put anything heavy on my back while my spine is ostensibly readjusting, but I'm not sure if this is actually recommended or not. Also bear in mind that probably 0.5% of his patient base would even consider doing deep squats, hence no special instructions on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
Do you have any pictures before vs now?
I don't have great before pictures, but I do have some. I'll see if I can re-create the same pose and take some this weekend. I do have before x-rays and can probably get a copy of the current x-rays too. I'll keep this in my medium-term todo list.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
You say sitting is painful - is it worse now than before the procedure?
I would say that, when I made this quote, it seemed more painful than it was before the procedure. But it has since improved (see my update later on). Plus it's hard to say whether it really was more painful or just seemed that way because the standing had improved so much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Mallory View Post
I wouldn't count on your back getting better from NUCCA alone......In my experience, it just doesn't happen that way, but it is most definitely a big piece of the healing puzzle. As for muscle training, I wouldn't bother working with a NUCCA, as they usually don't know what their doing. Go to North Shore Smart Bodies for that.
Mike,

I appreciate your thoughts as always. I think for the time being, I'm going to avoid doing more P.T. and just see what happens "naturally" between the fixed hips and yoga. Mostly because I'm trying to test the doc's hypothesis that NUCCA alone "solves it." And partly because of finances. . Nonetheless, given how valuable your advice has been up until this point, I am definitely keeping this on my radar if it seems like things begin to stall for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Gainer View Post
Judging from personal experience, always make sure your neck, mid back, and lower back are strong. I say this because a weak link in one can affect the other. Stability exercises(isometrics mainly) are a big plus to getting back in the game.
This is what my last two chiros, and the orthopedist/physical therapist I visited last year, all told me. I had been doing Crossfit WODs for about a year. Then I did strengthening exercises at my two straight chiros, 2-3x a week for a year (including manual therapy 1x/week for 6 months) . Finally, after I saw the ortho, I did 30 sessions of professionally prescribed physical therapy specifically meant to target weak core and back/shoulder muscles. None of this seemed to help my problem much at all (it certainly did not decrease the pain), which is what led me to try something a bit more "out there."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kulsoom Ahmed View Post
I am thinking to try at least one visit to an NUCCA. my problem has been on the right side, starting at the neck.

I dont know of anyone that has been to one in my city (atlanta)

I went to the directory and found there are three in my state. The one who is closest to me is also the only board certified one.

considering I have no referrals to this doc, is it worth giving a shot? They are out of network, and I think my out of network benefit is 70% coverage of the cost, first visit costs $130
(I sent you some stuff in a PM). I can't say 100% that it's going to be worth it to you, but I would definitely say that based upon my results so far, I don't regret doing it. Sorry I can't provide a more definitive answer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
I had my first visit last Friday with a NUCCA doc near me in NJ. He only took measurements and x-rays. They did not make any adjustments. They said that my atlas is displaced, and they thought that my problem is within their scope to help fix. But I have to go back for a second visit after they've "analyzed the data". Nothing wrong with that.
That's more or less how mine went, but your x-rays sound quite a bit cheaper. My doc did the analysis the same day (total appointment was around 4 hours for the x-rays, analysis, adjustment, and maintenance instructions).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
I think I wont get back there again for the follow up until 10/30. Overall, it still seems a bit hokey to me. Not the fact that my spine is not balanced and my muscles are in constant (but usually not painful) spasm, and that my atlas might be to blame. It just seems a bit odd that they can fix it so easily. But again - they haven't done anything yet. And in my case they didn't even specify what they think they can do for me.
Neal,

Believe me, I understand and share your skepticism 100%. Just wait until the actual adjustment! I have actually woken up in a cold sweat recently, wondering whether I'm in the process of losing my mind. This whole experience causes me a fair amount of cognitive dissonance and associated psychological stress. I've been an atheist and skeptic for a long time. I enjoy poking holes in news articles, (silently) identifying logical fallacies used in the arguments of those around me, and debunking those oft-uttered but nonetheless untrue statements made by just about everyone (it goes without saying that http://snopes.com/ (w/fs) is one of my regular destinations). I've never known anything approaching an "easy fix" for any problem in my life or those of anyone close to me. Right now I'm really struggling to understand if/how this could possibly be working. For the life of me, I can't, and it bothers me. Why would we have evolved with an atlas that is so easily displaced, to the point of causing major quality of life impairments? It just doesn't make sense.

I would say that you shouldn't expect a quick fix at all, no matter what they tell you. If it does what it's supposed to, your spine and hips will straighten out and then your body starts to heal. The amount of time this takes probably depends a lot on individual factors and physiology (including how long the underlying disorder has been there, and how "off" things were for that period).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
The cost was $147 out of pocket for that visit and apparently the next. I don't know if that price includes the first adjustment. I should be able to get some reimbursed by my insurance, to be honest I don't know. But I'll have to pay cash and file the claims - they don't.
Mine is the exact same way. I'm not sure how much trouble I will have getting reimbursed from BCBS since I've never done a claim on my own before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
In my case, I don't mind spending the money with the potential to become healthier. I'm still skeptical and if money were a (major) factor I might think differently. But I've got nothing to lose.
That's my exact attitude as well. If the treatment works, or at least unlocks the underlying problem as Mike has described it elsewhere in this thread, then I would consider it worth every penny and probably 100x that. In fact, if my back cracking and discomfort improves by 90% on a permanent basis, I will be making a sizable donation to their research organization.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal Carlson View Post
In my case, I don't mind spending the money
Note that I'm not the type that goes to doctors often. In fact I almost never go. But I recently had a change of heart…. I went to a dermatologist for a minor case of psoriasis which I've had for literally a decade. He gave me a cream almost eliminated it in a week. In this case, my back is much more important that the psoriasis and therefore I think worth chance.

I'll post again after my next visit.
Please do; I'm very curious to hear about your experience.

UPDATE

Last weekend (Oct. 10-11) was great. My back felt better than I can ever remember and there was very little cracking going on.

On Tuesday night (Oct. 13), I was lying in bed (on my back) and squirming around a little bit. I ended up subconsciously using my head/neck to lift my body up and shift it a little to one side, a pretty common thing I imagine lots of people do without thinking about it. As soon as I did this I felt something shifting inside the back of my neck and the sensation was quite unsettling (but not painful). I remember thinking "Oh sh**" right when it happened. The next couple of days I felt like absolute crap - back was back to being painful again, my energy levels were shot, and the ever-present sinus congestion came back in full force.

I had a scheduled follow-up on Friday (Oct. 16). Before the appointment I told him about the incident Tuesday night. He checked my leg lengths and said there was an inch difference again (it had been 1.5 inches on the first visit, and 0 after the correction). My hip level was also off by 5 degrees. So he confirmed the correction was lost. He did another adjustment that day and it seemed to fix it (leg lengths and hip level were back to 0). Back to feeling great (with increased energy, comfortable back, and clear sinuses) by Saturday night (Oct. 17). He said it hadn't cost me anything except money (it's basically a trivial amount extra if he does an adjustment versus just a check up) and time (a week of lost recovery time, plus however long it's been since the loss of correction, so around 10 days total). This sequence of events along convinces me to continue giving it the benefit of the doubt.
__________________
www.jeffevans.us (occasional bad language, otherwise w/fs)
Food log

Last edited by Jeff Evans : 10-19-2009 at 04:12 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2009, 12:17 PM   #30
Kulsoom Ahmed
Member Kulsoom Ahmed is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Atlanta  GA
Posts: 113
Re: Ongoing back problems: a new hypothesis

I had my first visit today. It only included the measurements (lying down on a table, measuring leg length differences), the standing laser thing (where you put your heels into a base and they use that to figure out if you are off center vertically and horizontally), then the 2-3 X-rays taken from the side and front. This was where they taped two metal pellets near my ears, used a string to figure out alignment I assume. The one to the front I remember putting my chin into something.

So after the discussion, consultation and X-rays.. I was told I was off center to one side, and twisted towards the other. I had an MRI one year ago, so I already knew that some of the discs in my neck are compressed. In the X-ray this was seen as some spacings were closer together than the others. One good thing I noted on my own was in an X-ray I had taken last year, the cervical discs looked too straight (which I was told was due to muscle strain/pulling on it) but in this one I saw today had more curve.

He noted the compression seen in the discs and said if I did not take care of it, it could become worse where I would need to get surgery which involved putting metal inside. He then mentioned that running is bad and I should not do it and then he asked if I ran. I said I do run sometimes but not long distances (aka Crossfit). He said that this does not mean I can never run, but to stop running now and while I get treatment because I could lose my adjustments or get worse.

I was not given a proposed number of visits (which I did not expect - because I know that is not always predictable) or an adjustment. I am supposed to go to another visit which would include his estimate of what I would need to correct my issue, possible number of visits needed, an adjustment and some other films/X-rays.

I would consider going on the next visit but two things are making me doubtful... the first is the major one

1) Money. This visit was $130 and assuming I get full 70% coverage for out of network, then my cost will be $39 when I get reimbursement. This second visit, I was told, they do not know what it would cost because they do not know what number of things he will need to do. After saying I do not need to make an appointment till I get reimbursed for this current visit, I was told minimum it might cost $475, $75 for the adjustment and $400 for the films/X-rays.

My concern is having to pay $475 or more up front and waiting to get reimbursed. Also, I might not get a full 70% because the costs have to fall in a reasonable range that the insurance company uses. For example if they charge me $100 for something, but the insurance company says no a reasonable cost should not be more than $75, they will only reimburse me for 70% of $75 while I pay the remainder of $25.

I will work on getting this information from the insurance company.. I just wonder, are NUCCA's this expensive normally?

2) When he started talking about running and metal rods in my neck, was when I started getting doubtful. I have been doing Crossfit for 1.5 years actively (before that 6 months on and off). I have had this tightness pulling issue on the right side of my neck for a long time and I do realize my posture has not been great but over time with other care I have had, getting stronger etc, I would say that my issue with my neck is better, just not 100% gone. So I do not know if I would agree with the running comment, I mean maybe it would ruin an alignment? I don't know, but the way he talked about running (and I assume he might have a similar opinion of other crossfit movements) is that its messing up my spine or cervical discs.

As for metal rods and surgery, I do understand this is a reality for people but just because someone has compressed discs and try to be active, they all do not have to go get surgery because activity is going to shatter their spine. It is possible I misunderstood him, or he wanted me to convince me to go forward with treatment.

At this point, I am not sure what to do. It would be nice to be 100% as opposed to 90% better. I have already spent time and money on this issue, hence my cynicism but the cost for this treatment is going to be the most I have spent, unless subsequent visits are cheaper.

I still have my appointment as the receptionist said that for me to just come talk to him about what he thinks and proposed treatment, it would not cost anything.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Self Help for Low Back Problems Rick West Injuries 9 11-28-2008 12:00 PM
Back problems Maddie Melnick Fitness 6 07-02-2008 09:23 AM
Sarah's CrossFit Success Story...ongoing of course Sarah Childs Testimonials 14 05-22-2007 08:44 AM
Back problems Ryan Norman Injuries 8 11-26-2005 04:11 AM
Back problems Paul Symes Injuries 3 01-31-2005 04:59 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.