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Old 12-22-2006, 12:23 PM   #1
James Falkner
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I've been cursed with short ceilings in my garage. I think mine are 8 or maybe 8.5 feet. I have total garage envy with my neighbor who has 12' ceilings and doesn't use it for CF (yeah, what's up with that!).

Anyway, just wondering if anyone has given any thought or actually raised their ceilings? I have mostly dead space above the garage (we store some junk in there). I was thinking I could just raise the "middle" of the garage, and not have to cut any trusses in the attic. I'm not sure if this is worth it though, since it wouldn't be a huge space. Thoughts? Anyone care to venture a guess as to how expensive this would be?
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Old 12-22-2006, 01:13 PM   #2
Mark Miller
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James-questions
1. Do you have carpentry skills?
2. Do you know if the roof structure is a web type truss system or a rafter system?
3. Can you send photos?
4. Is the ceiling finished?
5. Think about code requirements as well. Not a big deal until you sell then you have to bring it back to code.
Depending on what you are dealing with you may be able to raise the entire ceiling area without any real structural changes. This is more labor intensive than expensive. If you have a truss system things get tricky. You can't vault the ceiling without some real thought into engineering and structural changes. Which = $$$$. With out visuals I can't say what your best option is. You can always consult a structural engineer. Hope that helps.
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Old 12-22-2006, 01:17 PM   #3
Paul Findley
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If there are trusses, it is not clear how you could not disturb them since they would be equally spaced.

Whatever you do, keep your ability to re-sell in mind.

You could have the current roof framing removed and replaced with a vaulted ceiling. I bet you would be the only house in the neighborhood to boast a vaulted garage ceiling.
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Old 12-22-2006, 04:19 PM   #4
paul arestan
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I'm doing a job at my girlfriend's place where the ceiling height in the garage was too low to turn it into a living area. Because of local building regulations, we could not raise the ceiling in the garage, so we excavated instead and gained about 3 feet in ceiling height.
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Old 12-22-2006, 05:52 PM   #5
James Falkner
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Mark,

1. Some. Chances are it's out of my league (I'll send pics later). I've made lots of CF equipment and a sweet, way WAY over-engineered workbench.

2. Not sure, I'm guessing it's a rafter system. Pics later (it's beer thirty here).

3. Stay tuned.

4. Ceiling is finished with typical drywall.

5. Yeah, code issues will likely make me seek professional help and a permit. I appreciate your advice though!

Paul F.,

Vaulted ceiling would probably be the only thing I'd really want, as that would maximize my space for hanging things and swinging :-)

Paul A.,

Good idea, but we're on a concrete slab here in central florida, so I think that rules out excavation.
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Old 12-23-2006, 12:47 PM   #6
Frank M Needham
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James, likely those ceiling heights have been designed by a licensed structural engineer who stamped the drawings as required by the local Building and Safety Dept who then approved the drawings for construction. It is their way of holding the engineer responsible for the structural integrity & design of your home. To alter that legally would require that a new structural design for the ceilings be submitted by a licensed engineer to the same Dept which would then approve the permit for the space to be rebuilt. If you do not do this you will incur problems later upon resale as it is the responsiblity of the Real Estate Agent involved in the sale to research such matters and then disclose them to the potential buyer. Check with your B&S Dept to find out what they require before proceeding. In the Vegas area a PE, SE will not touch a set of plans for stamping for less than $500. Another consideration you may have to deal with in the case of engineered plans is that your B&S Dept may require you to use a licensed contractor as they may consider you, as a homeowner attempting to do such work, unqualified.


(Message edited by fmn on December 23, 2006)
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Old 12-23-2006, 01:22 PM   #7
Roger Smith
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All this makes it sound like the city owns the property LOL.....
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Old 12-26-2006, 05:18 PM   #8
James Falkner
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As promised, some pics from my attic. So, is it just plain dumb to try and vault this thing? Anyone care to venture a ballpark guestimate on how much this would be, in the southeast (central Florida). Say, $5k? $10k? It's a 2-car garage sized area.

http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/26/34526.jpghttp://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/26/34527.jpg
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Old 12-27-2006, 07:43 AM   #9
Frank M Needham
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Those are engineered trusses. I'd use a minimum of $100/ft for costing which works out to 32k for a 16x20 garage. Basically what you are talking about doing is replacing the whole frikkin roof. Not worth it. Buy a another home with a higher roof.

(Message edited by fmn on December 27, 2006)
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Old 12-27-2006, 04:39 PM   #10
James Falkner
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Ouch. No way am I sinking that kind of cash into a garage mod that no one in their right mind would pay a premium for (well, except for CF'ers, but not sure they count ;) )

Thanks for the honest answer. Back to the drawing board (figuratively).
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