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Old 11-17-2008, 11:27 AM   #1
Christian Mason
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"Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

So this morning I received an email link to a WebMD article on “Ten Diet Myths” (wfs: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/...Health_4555658)

This frustrated me enough to get me to write a blog rant about it. This is someone who is at least attempting to educate themselves about healthier habits, and they’re running into this. I fear this, well intentioned, but not overly well informed person is going to use this as justification for continuing their habits.

What got me, is that most of the information was arguably correct on a point-by-point basis, but seemed to be missing the big picture. How does one address this? Especially in light of the fact that I lack any of the educational credentials the original author has, which, at least in the eyes of most, significantly undermines my credibility.

I also want to note that this isn’t case of me going out and trying to convert people – I’ve moved passed those arguments some time ago. This is someone who sent me a link to an article and asked for my thoughts. Thoughts on the blog response (wfs: http://fitnessfail.com/webmd-article-on-10-diet-myths/) are appreciated as well.

Mods – should this be in community?
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Old 11-17-2008, 01:05 PM   #2
Sara Fleming
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

The article is disturbing, your response pretty much describes why.

I'll further it by saying this: The response by the dietiticians would be fine if everyone ate well-balanced whole-foods based diets and occasionally treated themselves to refined grains and sugars. However, the majority of
Americans center their diets around foods whose main ingredients are refined grains and sugars and saying that these foods are okay for them is like telling an alcoholic that its okay to have some whiskey now and then.

Pretending that most Americans don't subsist solely on crap and then telling them that the crap isn't really that bad for them "in moderation" when they don't even understand what "in moderation" is, is just plain irresponsible.
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Old 11-17-2008, 01:20 PM   #3
Brad Kuper
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

I started a similar thread awhile back because I have the same issues as you. here it is:

http://www.board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=38399
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Old 11-17-2008, 01:23 PM   #4
Brad Kuper
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

Here is another one that I just saw this morning (pay close attention to slides #3 and #10):

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders...ow-sleep-foods

WebMD specializes in this type of "advice."
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Old 11-17-2008, 03:05 PM   #5
Jamie J. Skibicki
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

If I have some some carbs before bed, it helps me fall asleep.

As for the diet tips, they are mostly crap. But you also have to understand who this is written for. Some one who does some bosu ball stuff with 5 lb dumbells doesn't need the protien a CFer or someone doing SS does.
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Old 11-17-2008, 04:04 PM   #6
Christian Mason
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie J. Skibicki View Post
If I have some some carbs before bed, it helps me fall asleep.

As for the diet tips, they are mostly crap. But you also have to understand who this is written for. Some one who does some bosu ball stuff with 5 lb dumbells doesn't need the protien a CFer or someone doing SS does.
I agree with you about the intended audience. But at the same time, that's part of what strikes me as so irresponsible about it. If you VERY carefully read what is said, they don't advocate eating sugar filled, processed crap.

But, a less than precise reading of this article easily comes out to "HFCS is fine" and "sugar is fine for kids". The intended audience of this article actually takes it as an authority, which is why I feel this kind of advice is so harmful.

I'm nearly certain that someone out there is using this kind for writing as justification for another crispy creme.
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Old 11-17-2008, 08:16 PM   #7
Jamie J. Skibicki
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

You got me there. I agree that HFCS isn't much worse for you than regular sugar, but thats sort of like saing it's better to get shot with a .40 than a .50, they both suck.

I get tired of dealing with this, fighting all the feel good, it's not your fault, you don;t really have to change your lifestyle, keep doing what made this way diet and fitness advice. I've tried giving people advice, but they don't want to hear about it. Screw them.
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Old 11-18-2008, 07:19 AM   #8
Christian Mason
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

To be honest, I'm rapidly getting to the same point.

Last week I watched a guy "deadlift" (technically a low rack pull) 405lbs with straps and fully rounded lumbar spine. He had 2 or 3 hitches to get it up.

You know the youtube video, "The Worlds Perfect Deadlift"? It seriously looked like that. Awhile ago I probably would've said something, politely pointed out that he was setting up a recipe for disaster.

Now, I just shook my head and keep working out. My patience for people who won't take the time to learn for themselves is starting to wean. I get that.

Self professed authorities giving people dangerous advice DO still get to me though. I mean, honestly the majority of people aren't going to become serious athletes, study this stuff to the extent that we do, etc...but when someone does make an effort to change their habits, and encounters this kind of crap I find it really depressing.
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Old 11-18-2008, 08:27 AM   #9
Mike ODonnell
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

Once I started doing and talking about IF.....I stopped reading all mainstream media news...as I am obviously doing everything wrong now. (note sarcasm)
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Old 11-18-2008, 09:29 AM   #10
Shane Skowron
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Re: "Half-correct" information in mainstream news sources

"Rosenbloom recommends that after weight training , athletes consume a little bit of protein - about 8 grams, the amount in a small carton of low-fat chocolate milk - to help their muscles rebuild. "

Once again they ruin the world's most perfect beverage by suggesting the low-fat version!



Christian, I've read your blog, and it has good points. Make your "grains experiment" a sample size of 2 now. I'm an endurance athlete of sorts also, and I've noticed increases in strength, stamina, speed, and a decrease in bodyfat and improved body composition since switching out of grains entirely (except for cookies ... mmm).

Last edited by Shane Skowron : 11-18-2008 at 09:33 AM.
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