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Old 06-30-2008, 06:44 PM   #1
Jeremy Campbell
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High Blood Pressure!

Hey CFers,

I'm experiencing a little High Systolic Pressure, 140-149. However, my Diastole is 62-70. Wondering if anyone had experienced this before or if it is normal to experience this. Any projections or reasons to explain this would be great.
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Old 06-30-2008, 07:25 PM   #2
Robert Pierce
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Re: High Blood Pressure!

If your BP was repeatedly taken correctly, you have hypertension.

Don't ignore it. Morbidity and mortality starts to rise with systolic BPs over 120.
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Old 06-30-2008, 08:04 PM   #3
George Mounce
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Re: High Blood Pressure!

Nutrition then CrossFit.

Problem will solve itself.
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Old 06-30-2008, 08:05 PM   #4
Chris Butner
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Re: High Blood Pressure!

If you don't have a doctor then you should get a good one. Have a open dialog, but be careful many doctors like meds as a easy fix. Do you have family history of high BP. If so maybe no avoiding meds. How is your diet ? Stay away from salts, and processed food. You work out I assume. Do you relax ? Do things to mellow you out. Take time to unwind after busy/stressful days. Try yoga, meditation things of this nature. Do you have funds for acupuncture. Acupuncture doctors can be very beneficial, but you need to find one that knows what they are doing. For now my last advice would be get a home BP kit. Take your pressure once a week. Don't just rely on doctor visit readings usually they can be high from the stress of the visit. BP is always the highest in the morning. So you could check it a different times of the day. Maybe log it for a few weeks before going to a doctor. This is a process. As long as you don't have strong family history of BP. You should be able to bring that # down. If you have the motivation, and a supportive doctor to do it without drugs.......Oh yeah don't stress over it. That will make your BP worse. Monitor it weekly, and actively work on improving it. It IS possible to lower it on your own. Trust me I have gone down this road, beat it. 140 is a bit high, but 149 is definitely high. Get it down to 130 at least. If you can get into the 120's even better. The medical community keeps lowering the # that is considered high so it can be kind of confusing on what is really a high number. If you can get it to stay at 130 you will be out of the red zone for the most part. Of course the more you reduce it the better.

Last edited by Chris Butner : 06-30-2008 at 08:13 PM.
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Old 06-30-2008, 11:33 PM   #5
Frank E Morel
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Re: High Blood Pressure!

lets discuss this one in turn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
If you don't have a doctor then you should get a good one. Have a open dialog, but be careful many doctors like meds as a easy fix.
NO, its not the doctors chris, its the patient population, Fast food generation expects this of modern medicine " I have a problem, and I want it fixed NOW in the easiest way possible. Many peoples' compliance to lifestyle changes is near zero. Many people with high blood pressure do not exercise in any form, reduce caffeine intakes to realistic levels, reduce sodium intake to within a more beneficial level, or of course quit smoking.
So what is a Md, to do, let their patient go on with an elevated bp which now places him in the high risk percentile of serious heart disease, or stroke even kidney failure?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
Do you have family history of high BP. If so maybe no avoiding meds.
Not true, if a conscious effort and awareness is truly made, being medication free is very possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
How is your diet ? Stay away from salts, and processed food. You work out I assume. Do you relax ? Do things to mellow you out. Take time to unwind after busy/stressful days. Try yoga, meditation things of this nature.
That is very helpful, if there no other physiological problems to your elevated BP, and you have alter the lifestyle aspects as well. Stress would be a likely cause.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
Do you have funds for acupuncture. Acupuncture doctors can be very beneficial, but you need to find one that knows what they are doing.
Whatever works, the power of the mind is strong.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
For now my last advice would be get a home BP kit. Take your pressure once a week. Don't just rely on doctor visit readings usually they can be high from the stress of the visit.
Nicknamed white coat syndrome. bp fine at home.. office.. up.
Taking your own blood pressure is technique reliant.. ie left arm always, at the level of your heart, no wiggling or squeezing of hand or fingers during the inflation of the cuff. These impact the reading. Also, the machine itself there is such a wide variance how the thing works its almost hard to say what is true vs false.
Ask your pharmacist what brands are top shelf vs buying el cheap at walmart. Take it with you to your office and ask THE RN to teach you to use it. NOt the medical assistant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
BP is always the highest in the morning. So you could check it a different times of the day. .
NO.. bp is always at the lowest in the morning. Basal Metabolic Rates which influences BP are low in the morning and raise thru the day, with early afternoon as being the highest and from there it goes downwards as the metabolism begins to unwind.
There is a reason why when your in hospital the nurse wakes you up from a dead sleep to take your bp at 6 am. The standard routine: 6 am 10 am 2pm 6 pm 10pm


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
Maybe log it for a few weeks before going to a doctor. This is a process.
agreed, a log is great for tracking and understanding what going on. Any self management of a health problem is a process. It can be done, its up to the person to be interested, willing, and apply themselves to the process.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
As long as you don't have strong family history of BP
You should be able to bring that # down. If you have the motivation, and a supportive doctor to do it without drugs
Again see the first comment, Any md worth their salt is going recommend usual diet, exercise, lifestyle. But if the bp is 210/109, counselling about eating spam daily or the 2 pack a day habit is too late. keeping the patient from ending up in a wheelchair with half the body paralysed is the goal and requires medication til the root of the problem is found.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
.......Oh yeah don't stress over it. That will make your BP worse. Monitor it weekly, and actively work on improving it. It IS possible to lower it on your own.
great advice here... no question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
Trust me I have gone down this road, beat it. 140 is a bit high, but 149 is definitely high. Get it down to 130 at least. If you can get into the 120's even better.
that should be the goal.. 120s

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
The medical community keeps lowering the # that is considered high so it can be kind of confusing on what is really a high number.
The reason being for the changes as ... even at 130s the risk for bad outcomes like heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure, were occuring. But at 120s, the risks are near controllable. For every 15 point reduction from your systolic; your reducing your risk factors by 10 percent. Assuming you are looking at the whole picture. ie. taking medication for bp but still smoking 1 pack a day is not going to as effective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Butner View Post
If you can get it to stay at 130 you will be out of the red zone for the most part. Of course the more you reduce it the better.
NOt true.. the whole picture is required to be looked at.
jermey
you need to look at yourself a bit more ..and see all the factors. YOU DONT HAVE TO ANSWER THEM HERE. just reflect on them.

ie .. age, wt (overwt?) smoker? caffeine usage, over the counter medication usage ie allergy medication? fat burners? energy drink consumption( many have herbal stimulants that as potent as caffine, and cocaine use)
past use of street drugs.
family history of heart disease, kidney disease.

your md screening your heart ie echo cardiogram for efficiency of the heart valves. Looking at your kidney function?

consider seeing an internal medicine doctor that has a interest in blood pressure management, if your primary doctor is not providing sufficient information to you. ( sorry Robert.. some primary care practises are a sausage factory.. patient in .. then out with a prescription. )

If you have questions, feel free to inbox or email me. Be more than willing to explain something.
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:21 AM   #6
Robert Pierce
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Re: High Blood Pressure!

No offense taken, Frank. Excellent post.
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Old 08-29-2008, 01:18 PM   #7
Adam Drake
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Re: High Blood Pressure!

You should examine spurious systolic hypertension. If you're tall and athletic that's probably what's going on.

My systolic BP often read in the 140s (never below 135) until I started using a wrist monitor and now it's usually around 116-125. My resting heart rate averages in the low-mid 40s.

The brachial BP cuff is probably reading a false peak in your pulse wave. Go get a wrist monitor and if you still have the same issues I would see a doctor.

Feel free to email me or IM me if you'd like to talk specifics.

===
edit: here is the abstract from an article in the American Journal of Hypertension
===
BACKGROUND: We examined the role of high pulse pressure (PP) amplification in spurious systolic hypertension (SSH). METHODS: We recorded demographic characteristics, brachial blood pressure (BP) (Omron Model HEM-705 CP, Vernon Hills, IL), aortic BP, and arterial wave reflection (Sphygmocor, AtCor Medical, version 6.2, NSW, Australia) and PP amplification in 174 healthy medical students (87 male) and 22 young male hypertensive subjects. RESULTS: Eleven subjects had SSH (147 +/-2 v control 114 +/-1 mm Hg, mean +/- SEM,), normal aortic and brachial diastolic BP with an aortic pressure waveform that was normal in contour and amplitude. All were male, tall, nonsmokers, and active in sports, with slower heart rate, reduced arterial wave reflection (-8 +/- 3 v -0.7 +/-1) and enhanced PP amplification (31 +/-1 v 18 +/-1 mm Hg, P <.01. In contrast, male hypertensive subjects had reduced amplification (14 +/-0.9 mm Hg) and enhanced arterial wave reflection (17 +/-1.9). CONCLUSIONS: The SSH of youth, with raised brachial but normal aortic systolic BP, is commonly seen in tall men who are active in sports and are nonsmokers. It may be explained by the exaggerated first systolic peak in the brachial artery pressure waveform, which is due to very high PP amplification and low arterial wave reflection due to elastic arteries.

Last edited by Adam Drake : 08-29-2008 at 01:20 PM. Reason: added abstract
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