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Old 05-18-2006, 05:34 AM   #21
Ben Kaminski
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Carl, as I said, the muscle meat was not ignored when the food supply was small enough.

David, In the section of Weston Price's book that studies diets in africa, he describes a tribe in which two young men killed an elephant as a rite of passage. The kill benefited the entire village, but only two people were needed to accomplish it. I guess an animal like that weighs approximately 6 tons, and I imagine in Africa they would not have a surplus of food, and so would not ignore the muscle meat of an animal. In fact, they often drink the blood, process the bones, and try to use as much of an animal as possible.
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Old 05-18-2006, 07:01 AM   #22
Garrett Smith
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Due to fascia, it would seem to me that muscle meat would be a significant amount of work to obtain with primitive tools, as opposed to the comparative ease of organ meats (once inside the abdominal cavity).

We don't tend to see the fascia much anymore, the butchers have already taken care of that for us.
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Old 05-18-2006, 09:08 AM   #23
Jibreel Freeland
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Good point DocG, I'd never thought of that.
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Old 05-18-2006, 11:26 AM   #24
Garrett Smith
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Thanks, Jibreel. The deer and elk meat my parents shared with me reminded me of what a pain the fascia is to deal with, and that's with modern cutlery!

I couldn't imagine trying to use a sharp rock on the stuff.

No wonder vultures have such razor-sharp beaks. They have to in order to deal with what's left over!
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Old 05-18-2006, 12:18 PM   #25
Jibreel Freeland
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Yeah, I have dealt with a few elk/deer carcassas and the fascia is a pain for sure. I had never thought that that might be another incentive for consuming organ meats but that does make sense.

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Old 05-20-2006, 06:52 AM   #26
Marc Moffett
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A few random points.

First, talking about saturated fats in a blanket manner is almost certainly going to lead to error. Would you generalize everything about unsaturated fats or would draw distinction between mono and polyunsaturated fats (and O3s and O6s)? Talking about the saturated fat composition of wild animals is a start, but only that. I would be willing to bet big bucks that the fatty acid composition of various saturated fats is quite different, for instance, in game animals vs grass fed animals. (I DON'T mean that there is more of it, but that the types of SFAs is different.)

Second, it is important to take a very long view of paleolithic nutrition. For most of hominoid history, humans have been scavengers, not top-level predators. They weren't scavenging organ meats (which are preferentially eaten by other top predators)--accept maybe the brain. Most likely left over muscle and bone marrow. I don't know how significant this is, but it needs to be factored in.

Third, in more recent history humans were widely dispersed. This suggests that for the last 50,000 years or so there has been differences in diet between various subpopulations simply due to the fact that there were differences in the available megafauna.

Finally, as I recall HGs preferentially eat fatty parts of the carcass. But since survival is the main objective, selectively eating fatty components only occurs during periods of excess meat procurement. In the buffalo jumps here in Wyoming, for instance, a very large number of animals were killed at one time. The Native Americans, consequently, preferentially ate the tongues and fatty hump. (The rest went to "waste" because they couldn't utililze it effectively.) But such kills typically occurred seasonally. The rest of the time, they ate as much as they could of the animals they killed.

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Old 05-20-2006, 09:26 AM   #27
Neal Winkler
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This is why it's all a bit of speculation to try and ascertain any sort of recommendations on this matter. In the end, you have to let the controlled studies do the talking. What do they say?

(Message edited by trianglechoke7 on May 20, 2006)
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