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Old 06-05-2007, 08:19 PM   #11
Michael Tong
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Amy,

In case it helps, I'll weigh in a bit more about Costco. They have some decent deals on some items but it's not the end of the world if you don't have one close. Here are some of the better deals they have (prices may vary, obviously):

- 3lb bag of almonds for ~ $10
- 3lb bag of walnuts for ~ $10
- grass-fed lamb from down-under for $3.99/lb
- broiler chickens that I've already mentioned
- 400 ct of fish oil for ~ $9
- pork tenderloin ~ $1.99/lb.
- lean ground turkey $1.99/lb.
- 3lb bag of wild blueberries for ~ $6
- big bags for frozen strawberries and various veggies
- 1.5 dz organic eggs for $3.69
- wild-caught salmon burger patties, 12 patties (3 lbs) for IIRC $11 - they are yummy
- 5 lb bag of baby carrots $4.99 (they use to have organic for the same price but I haven't seen them at my store lately)

They have large quantities of fresh produce but I find the prices are just so-so. It is convenient for me to buy like that in bulk but sometimes prices are same or better at the regular market.

Hopefully, this will help even if you aren't able to scope things out yourself. Send your hubby on a recon mission if these might be products you would use for your family.

For me, the almonds and walnuts by themselves are almost worth the price of admission. They are usually $7/lb at a regular supermarket, and I eat a lot of it.
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Old 06-05-2007, 08:24 PM   #12
Michael Tong
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Oh, by the way, does anyone in your family hunt? Venison is very paleo. I don't hunt myself but am thinking about taking it up this fall.
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Old 06-05-2007, 10:46 PM   #13
Ryan Tonkinson
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I was going to mention the same thing as Michael. Even if you don't hunt, perhaps you could register for a dear tag and "go hunting" with friend or family, letting them kill and you tag. It's a grey area legally in some states, but a $20 dollar tag and butcher costs are a lot cheaper than store bought (and it is truly wild game).

I will be looking to go Elk hunting soon for this very reason. A tag and butcher are A LOT cheaper than the $20+ a pound I see Elk meat going for online.

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Old 06-06-2007, 12:09 AM   #14
Brandon Oto
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One caveat I'd mention, being a recent kid myself, is that you don't want to get so vehement about forcing an alien diet onto your kids that they feel constrained, rebel, and in a few years are living on pizza. Almost any of the CF-related health activities I've started doing, were they forced on me when I had less autonomy, I'd probably have hated. That's why I'm a little wary of pushing them on kids... sure, I've made certain decisions for my health, but it would be absurd to expect everyone to agree with them.
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Old 06-06-2007, 05:16 AM   #15
Chris Honnon
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Michael - I've been thinking about your chicken breast example ever since reading your post the other day so thought I'd follow-up even if for no better reason than to be able to move on! lol.

The average fryer is 3 to 5 lbs. Take the middle road at 4 lbs times .79 and that's 3.16. The breast on a 4lb bird is going to be about a pound. The way I see it, since the rest goes to your well fed dog buddy, you pay $3.16/lb for your chicken breast.

On the other hand your example was not lost on me as I am a big believer in disassembling a whole chicken because of the tremendous savings overall. I actually tend to use all of the bird, including the bones (making stock for soups) but I don't have a dog giving me those "I'm starving" eyes anymore :-P

The same mentality can be applied to carving your own steaks out of a full roast, chops out of a full loin, etc. Great savings there. Costco has a lot of vacumn packed whole cuts waiting for people like us to come along and turn them into steaks!

On the produce, I have had a different experience in that the stuff I buy is much cheaper there than the grocery store. However, I'm sounding a bit like a Costco commercial and I'm probably beating this thread to death so enough from me!

Chris
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:11 AM   #16
Michael Tong
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Chris,

Huh? If I didn't buy Costco fryer chickens for my dogs, I'd still be buying raw chicken parts for them to eat, so there would still be an expense somewhere. Chicken frame parts from a butcher or grocer still costs money.

If I use your method of calculation, then I'd be paying $3.16 for chicken breast while getting free dog food. While I believe your method is only accounting for the cost of human-consumed food and therefore wrong, either way, it works for me. No matter where the food goes, the money comes from the same wallet.
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:13 AM   #17
Ben Kaminski
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Meat:
In my area, chicken breast goes on sale for $2/pound at the grocery store. Also, canned salmon is $1.36 for a 15 ounce can. Eggs are one of the cheapest and most healthy animal products one can buy. It's not paleo, but whey protein is another of the cheapest proteins money can buy.

Fat:
I like the canned salmon because one can has 7 grams of omega3's. That is equivalent to 14 standard fish oil capsules. I also get lard from a local farm. Eggs also have good fats. I eat nuts only occasionally lately, I much prefer animal fat.

Carbs:
I buy fruit that is on sale when I go shopping. This usually means the fruit is in season. Sweet potatoes can be as cheap as 79 cents per pound in my area, and they are very healthy. I would love to have a garden to grow my own veggies and greens, because these might be the most expensive part of my paleo diet. I don't eat too many carbs to be honest, but I make sure to eat my veggies each day.

I made up a chart of all of the meats, fats, and carbs that I had access to buy in my area. I listed the price per zone block for each food, and refined my diet to minimize the price while keeping nutrition and intake at optimal levels. I still splurge sometimes on dried blueberries or similar things, but the foundation of my diet is very cheap.

Hopefully this helps!
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:39 AM   #18
Chris Honnon
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Michael,

Understood and didn't mean to offend if I did. As I said I don't have a dog any longer but I did have one for fourteen years (up until last year). She didn't get fresh chicken parts for meals, she got dry dog food which cost about $20/mo when I bought it on sale at a local PetSmart. I would argue that my calculations may have been wrong for you however they would be accurate for someone like me.

In any regard I appreciated your comments and suggestions in this thread and I stand corrected.

Thanks.

Chris
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:54 AM   #19
Michael Tong
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Chris,

No offense taken. It's all good.

I like to think that my dogs are on a paleo diet as well :wink:. Commercial dog food is SOOOOOOO bad for man's best friend. Ever wonder why so many dogs get cancer, yet they have none of the vices (tobacco, alcohol, drugs) that their human counterparts have?

Sorry Amy... :focus:
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Old 06-06-2007, 07:44 AM   #20
Ron Fielder
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A word on the venison.
If you live in an area where there are seasonal hunts. Then you might check with the local butcher. Sometimes people will drop a deer for processing and then fail to pick it up. The butcher will want to move the product and will sell it after a time. So you get a box of cut and packaged meat, without having to sit in the cold rain and then gut the thing. Though some of us enjoy that part too.
Anyways I think you will find this to be an affordable expense if it is available, but it may only be seasonable.

I, too, spend a ton of money on food. Its frustrating but I have refined my diet down to a few things that I eat most of the time, and will only buy more expensive things like berries occassionally.
Good luck!
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