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Old 04-30-2004, 11:34 AM   #1
Greg Beesch
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In the video clip it indicates that there are 8 cycles of 10sec on/10sec off, which works out to about 2 and a half minutes. Someone suggested 4 to 5 minutes (I’ve been doing 10 on/10 off for 5 minutes), is that all right? And, in other iterations is it better to do 20 on/10 off or 20 on/20 off. . . etc. Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
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Old 04-30-2004, 11:58 AM   #2
Paul M
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Hey Greg,

The Tabata protocol is 20 seconds on, 10 seconds off, so one set of 8 "reps" would last just shy of 4 minutes. Been a while since I looked at the video - but I'd assume that's what they were doing.

Tabata has a nice balance of work to rest which will wipe you out in the 4 minutes when done all out. Going to other work/rest times would add variety, but might not be "tuned" as well as the 20/10. Worth a try, though!

Clarence Bass has good overviews of the Tabata protocols on his website. Here's one that talks about the work/rest ratio that Tabata came up with vs other intervals:

http://www.cbass.com/SEARCHOF.HTM


-Paul
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Old 04-30-2004, 02:15 PM   #3
Mark Roughton
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Quick follow-up question: I thought I saw somewhere a 2- or 3-week routine to help you work into a Tabata protocol for specific movements. It went something like 60 seconds on/30 off for a week, then 40/20, etc. Has anyone seen anything like that?

I think the reasoning behind the "ease into it" routine was that in some movements or activities, you might not be able to work at full capacity right away, so you do it at a slower rate, but longer, to help prepare your system. I think it kind of makes sense for things like full-out sprints; I mean, I run a lot, but I wouldn't want to go out and blast out 20 seconds at top speed without adapting to it a little more gradually. I'd blow a hamstring. But if I were to do a few 60/30s at 1/2 speed for a week, then 40/20 at 3/4 speed, or whatever, it might help prepare my legs to work at the higher rate.

Any thoughts on this? Or is the consensus here more along the lines of, just do the 20/10 at whatever speed you can handle?
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Old 04-30-2004, 02:36 PM   #4
Larry Lindenman
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I think you just want to complete the Tabata squats (or whatever) at an intensity level you could handle. Best not to mess with the parameters of the WOD, beyond modifications in weight (lowering prescribed weights if you can't handle the load).
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Old 04-30-2004, 02:51 PM   #5
Paul M
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In the "official" Tabata protocol, its actually not all-out. Its at a very particular value of your VO2max which is somewhat less than all out (170%, I think) which Tabata measured by having the athletes hooked up to machines. In the real world, its a bit trickier to know what intensity level you should work at. Probably you should start too low and gradually increase the speed until you're wasted by the end of the 7th or 8th "rep" (Tabata's athletes did between 6 and 8 reps, not always 8)

Tabata squats (or other exercises like it) are a bit different than the original Tabata protocol, and dialing down the intensity usually means doing fewer squats per "rep" -- which, at least for me, means having a split that's more like 18/12. I see Tabata squats as a different beast than Tabata sprints.

-Pal
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Old 04-30-2004, 06:47 PM   #6
James Taft
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Mark. That is a very good observation about Tabata and Sprinting. I can tell you from first hand experience that starting a sprint program based on Tabata type intervals going "all out" with little to no physical preparation will probably end in a pulled hamstring. This happened to me. I agree that you might want to work up to a good intensity gradually.
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Old 04-30-2004, 08:15 PM   #7
Mark Roughton
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Thanks for the feedback, all.

I agree that squats and sprinting are much different. Seems like a lot of the adjustment period depends on the kind of activity; I wonder if the distinction might be between endurance and strength-endurance activities. Building the intensity gradually for endurance activities like sprinting and rowing seems to make sense, but doing fewer reps or a lower weight for the 20/10 interval seems like a better approach for strength-endurance activities like squats, push-ups, pull-ups, etc. Interesting.

I'll keep looking for that other article and I'll post the link if I can find it.
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Old 05-04-2004, 03:18 PM   #8
Pat Janes
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Mark,

The article you describe sounds like Taku's Intervals (http://www.trainforstrength.com/Endurance1.shtml) explained on Scrapper's site.

The intervals get gradually more intense over a period of 4 weeks. Taku's intervals are used by a lot of MMA guys (see references to them on msg boards all over the place).

--pat
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Old 05-05-2004, 08:04 AM   #9
Dan John
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No, it's four minutes:
20 seconds on (and don't cheat and count unracking the bar on the time), ten seconds off is 30 Seconds. Repeat that once, one minute. For Tabata Front Squats, typical reps look like this for me:
8
8
7
6
7
5
5
8
I always make sure I get the 8 on the last set and ignore the clock. Most people don't use the right weights on these or BS themselves on the rest. 10 seconds is barely enough time to rack the bar. I only step back...really I just clear the rack...enough so I can dump the bar back in the rack and get a second or two more rest. In my life I have cleaned 402, but 65 pounds is my standard Tabata Front Squat weight...I can do 95 and hold reps, too, but I lose a few hours of life. I have tried as high as 155 and that was simply nothing but doubles in the last minute.

I always tell people not to mess with this "protocol"...how I hate that word. Try doing it my way and go deep and don't lock out the squats at the top, just drop back down. I had someone tell me they were doing these with 135 and "I got nothing." Well, they did 8 sets of 8, with free, open ended rest periods. (Back Squats, too...I coach high school freshman girls that can do that and not break a sweat either...)

The key is the ten seconds...I think a straight set of 64 or 50 reps would be easier than the ten second rests as, if you are really striving for 8's...the intensity of the 20 seconds is driving the engine here.
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Old 05-05-2004, 01:49 PM   #10
Greg Beesch
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Thank you, this info has been really helpful
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