CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Health and Medical Issues
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health and Medical Issues For other than injuries

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-19-2008, 07:42 PM   #1
Tom Seryak
Member Tom Seryak is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Dublin  Ohio
Posts: 389
attention cardiologists

I have a friend with several congenital heart defects that is interested in starting crossfit. Her defects include: dextracardia, pulmonic stenosis, septal wall defect, aortic leakage, and cyanosis. she is a personal trainer and has been active her whole life including gymnastics; however, her cardiologist has restricted her from doing anything that will cause a spike in blood pressure (so I guess max effort lifts are out? what if she doesn't hold her breath?). Her cardiologist has placed no restrictions on doing activities that increase her heart rate. I plan on discussing the crossfit training program with her cardiologist, but chances are he/she has no experience with Crossfit.

Are there any cardiologists out there that Crossfit? Can you offer me any insight on potential risks of her Crossfitting with these conditions? We plan to take an extended introduction to Crossfit to allow her the ability to re-define her limits, but i'm curious if there are some aspects of Crossfit that are just not worth the risk. Thanks ahead of time for your feedback/advice!
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2008, 06:57 PM   #2
Jon Harvey
Member Jon Harvey is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lynchburg  VA
Posts: 79
Re: attention cardiologists

Tom, first off, as my sig says, I am a Congenital Heart Defect Survivor (Double Outlet Right Ventricle/Tetralogy of Fallot), and not a cardiologist (yet...). That said, one of my big interests is exercise/fitness and how it relates to CHD.
Now I don't know your friend, so I can't Dx her condition or history (repaired vs unrepaired, medications, etc). In short, everyone's heart is different, especially amongst CHD. I don't know what type of cardiologist she sees, but if its a general adult cardiologist, I wouldn't listen to a word they say. Most adult cardiologists don't and won't deal with CHD patients, and if they do, they normally don't know what they're talking about and won't admit it. If she doesn't already she should see a an Adult Congenital Cardiologist, which are few and far between. I recommend going to achaheart.org (wfs) b/c they have a ACHD clinic directory.
All this being said many, if not most CHD patients are inactive, overweight and in general poor health due to chronic medical conditions, medication, and lifestyle. And b/c of that, many ACHD doctor's don't know much about exercise tolerance in the population, b/c they are already so deconditioned. I remember having one tell me only to lift light weights (>10lbs) and walk everyday: I promptly fell to the floor and banged out 50 pushups in his face.
Her best bet is to talk to an ACHD cardiologist who can specifically and correctly treat her condition and understand the hemodynamics of it.
Feel free to PM me about anything concerning CHD and exercise, its nice to hear about healthy CHD'ers for a change.
__________________
25/5'6/145
Use the Force
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2008, 07:49 PM   #3
Tom Seryak
Member Tom Seryak is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Dublin  Ohio
Posts: 389
Re: attention cardiologists

thanks jon i appreciate it! i will check out the resources that you mentioned and see what i can find out. i will update this post as things progress with any significant findings.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2008, 12:27 AM   #4
Frank E Morel
Member Frank E Morel is offline
 
Frank E Morel's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Santa Rosa  CA
Posts: 2,328
Re: attention cardiologists

tom your going to find the reason if you look up each of her sub diagnosi ...

one or two by themselves are bad.. but the whole gambit... that is really bad.
Her cardiologist most likely is trying to tell her... not to challenge herself overtly .. otherwise bad outcome could come sooner vs later.
__________________
Creating heaven on earth: one deadlift session at a time.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2008, 10:09 AM   #5
Jon Harvey
Member Jon Harvey is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lynchburg  VA
Posts: 79
Re: attention cardiologists

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank E Morel View Post
tom your going to find the reason if you look up each of her sub diagnosi ...

one or two by themselves are bad.. but the whole gambit... that is really bad.
Her cardiologist most likely is trying to tell her... not to challenge herself overtly .. otherwise bad outcome could come sooner vs later.
Actually it depends on the severity of each sub defect. Dextrocardia is normally accompanied by several defects such as many of these. Her stenosis could be mild or severe (like mine was, or it could have been corrected). Same with the Aortic Insufficiency, mine is minor and her's could be anywhere from trace to wide open. A VSD (or ASD) normally causes right to left shunting which is what leads to the cyanosis. Again, I'm not a doctor (and am not sure about you), but having dealt with these issues personally I can provide some insight, yet I won't try and provide some blind Dx via the internet and sans M.D.
__________________
25/5'6/145
Use the Force
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2008, 07:08 AM   #6
Brian De Mio
Member Brian De Mio is offline
 
Brian De Mio's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Charleston  SC
Posts: 79
Re: attention cardiologists

Jon your point is well taken.

I would, however, suggest extreme caution here. That client is not you and their medical history isn't enough to be able to tell on this board how bad the condition is. I would encourage any trainer to ask their client if they would present the types of workouts to their Cardiologist and discuss it with them. If a Cardiologist has the time he will suggest to the client what they may be able to do. I will tell you that they are going to err on the side of caution. One thing to understand here is that they have to worry about liability in a significant way. If I as a clinician give you permission to crossfit and you die in the gym I'm liable and I know that I will be in court soon.

I would say the same priniciple applies here to the trainer. I'm assuming you have no medical background and are relying on what the client is telling you. Remember that you are liable also and I would highly encourage you to get an approved physical from their Cardiologist with a list of approved exercises. You may not agree with his/her decision but then again do you really want to go to court or (god forbid) have the client die in front of you?

Everyone remember the Rhabdo case that went to court? That client won because the court determined the trainer and gym were negligent. It matters not what everyone else thinks or how they feel about the person or their condition. We live in a country where people sue for everything and I believe you really need to tread water carefully.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Attention C2 market value gurus John Kuhlman Equipment 10 11-01-2008 10:41 PM
****ATTENTION Ft. Benning CF!!! Rick Merrill In Search of CrossFitters 1 09-22-2008 02:02 PM
Attention Firefighters...!!! Adam Cordonnier Exercises 13 01-12-2008 09:11 PM
Attention Ruggers Russell Biser Community 14 03-28-2006 03:58 PM
Attention Firefighters Roy Starting 4 01-12-2004 04:37 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.