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Old 04-12-2012, 11:00 AM   #1
Glenn Pasewicz
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fitness and the generation gap

Seems like people I know who are of the Baby Boom generation, those who experienced the amazing rise in the standard of living from the 1950s through the late 70s, are more likely than subsequent generations to rely less on health and fitness as a personal responsibility and more on medical care and 'creature comforts' to compensate for poor health.

Thoughts?

As in, "Why should I exercise? Life's more enjoyable if I watch TV, eat ice cream, and take a pill."
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:15 PM   #2
Nik Nichols
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

I'm 45yo, born in 1967, workout up to 4 times a day, don't take meds. Squat 320lbs on a daily basis, just pulled 380lbs on deads for my 5/3/1 strength work. Doing deadhang muscle ups for fun today.

That is just me. I can't speak for anyone else.
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Old 04-12-2012, 03:40 PM   #3
Jeremy Moss
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

Not really, at least not in that way. It's the adjustment that a lot of people are trying to make to the big curve in technology and science advances which affect the ease of dealing with/completing tasks in every aspect of our lives.

Also, the majority of people got their daily exercises from work back then where today, the majority of peoples exercises need to come from self discipline.

We also have people living longer from medical advances.

Combine that all together, and you still have probably the same ratio of procrastinators vs. hard workers. It's just the combination of stale growth in hard labor job markets, more inexpensive 'quality of life' luxuries, and longer lives equal out to a more pronounced division of lazy to hard working people.
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Old 04-12-2012, 03:41 PM   #4
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

The Baby Boom ended in 1960. People born in the late 60s and 70s have totally different life experiences.

Since I'm 46 and more fit than I was in my 20s, I'm definitely not an example of your thesis. But you won't find a representative sample on the Crossfit board anyway.

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Old 04-12-2012, 06:02 PM   #5
Mark Patterson
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

I know what you are saying, but i am 53 and only have had a check up because my insurance co required it. My wife and i are trainers that run boot camps and personal training. We can Bury most 20 year old kids with met cons or strenth training. No winers here! I see many people running to the doc with minor issues that diet and exercise could resolve. I do not believe it is a generational issue, but we have become very soft in this country.
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Old 04-12-2012, 06:31 PM   #6
David Meverden
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

I have noticed a generation gap with my grandma's generation (I'm 29). I don't think "working out" was seen as something that regular people did. People trained for the military, worked hard on farms, or were athletes, but regular people didn't do extra exertion for (seemingly) no purpose. My grandma, for example, doesn't understand why I work out so hard but then don't want to do something like mowing the lawn.

I'm sure their are exceptions, but that has been my experience.
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Old 04-12-2012, 09:54 PM   #7
Clifton Mack
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

I love mowing the lawn!!! Lol
Full body workout, if you aren't using a riding mower. Mowed mine today and was sweating like crazy.
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Old 04-12-2012, 10:18 PM   #8
Jason Wallis
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

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Originally Posted by Clifton Mack View Post
I love mowing the lawn!!! Lol
You're welcome to come cut mine anytime. 3.5 hrs on a riding mower isn't my idea of fun!
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:31 AM   #9
Cliff Miller
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

i just got ****ed off at my lawn since i could never get it to turn into the perfect golf course putting green so i just graveled over the entire yard.

in the town that i live in the people over 50 may be more active than the people under 30.

i have organized a mountain bike race for the past 17 years it attracts 800 riders and the age catagroies are in 5 year incraments. it has been interesting to see a "buldge" in the male entrants starting in the mid 30's and now into the mid '50s this "buldge" has always for the past 17 years been the largest catagory.

every year i look at that and think to my self thank god i don't have to race with these guys they are fast.

generality yes but i know out here in b.c. by and large we are a fairly fit bunch of old people.
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:57 AM   #10
Robert Beckett
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Re: fitness and the generation gap

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Pasewicz View Post
Seems like people I know who are of the Baby Boom generation, those who experienced the amazing rise in the standard of living from the 1950s through the late 70s, are more likely than subsequent generations to rely less on health and fitness as a personal responsibility and more on medical care and 'creature comforts' to compensate for poor health.

Thoughts?

As in, "Why should I exercise? Life's more enjoyable if I watch TV, eat ice cream, and take a pill."
This rings true, although I don't know if there is a specific cutoff point generation-wise. I would say that, in general, the earlier a person was born, the less likely they are to value exercise rather than medical interventions.

My mom was born in 1937 and the very idea of choosing physical exertion for its own sake is foreign to her. She grew up in a time when medicine was coming up with very effective cures for then-serious health issues like polio and bacterial infections. And at the same time, most people did a lot of physical toil and didn't have effortless access to unlimited high-calorie food like today. So the idea of eat-less-move-more wasn't really there, whereas medical research seemed to offer increasingly reliable solutions to health problems. I think that culturally it's taking a while to come to terms with the limits of medical interventions vs the surprising, non-intuitive dangers of inactivity and lack of dietary vigilance.

My mom is obese and now bedridden due partly to poor diet & exercise habits. She never really believed in her heart-of-hearts that exercise is "for her". On the other hand she will take anything said by a man in a white lab coat as gospel.

For a generation raised on Stallone and Schwarzenegger (I was born in '67), we "get" that there are benefits to time spent in the gym. But in my mom's time, exercise was a very optional fringe interest. And the perception on fitness was that kids are inherently energetic and active, but as adults age, it's just "natural" and inevitable that they steadily become less physically capable. Those perceptions are hard to change once they are ingrained.

Last edited by Robert Beckett : 04-13-2012 at 08:08 AM.
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