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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 11-18-2005, 09:30 PM   #1
Ross Hunt
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If I am going to do a front tuck off an unyielding surface (e.g., hard wood floor as opposed to a trampoline, a spring-loaded gymnastics floor, or even mats, should I bend my knees to jump, or should I land with knees locked in a hollow position, as I would on a more yielding surface?

Right now I am jumping on to a mat one or two layers thick; I land in the standing hollow position, bounce off without bending my knees (as far as I can tell), and immediately tuck, landing on mats stacked more thickly.
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Old 11-19-2005, 12:16 AM   #2
Christopher Sommer
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Rebounding with the knees locked straight, as is commonly recommended, is somewhat of a misnomer. To completely lock the knees during a rebound could result in a hyper-extension.

During the rebound for roundoffs, back handsprings, front handsprings etc., the knees will surprisingly actually bend up to nearly a 1/4 squat (as evidenced by a recent film evaluation of world class tumblers at the Olympic Training Center that I attended).

During a rebound for a single somersault, or somersaults in a series, the knees will be VERY slightly bent and then rapidly explode to full extension. The difficulty in perception arises from the fact that high level athletes are so fast and powerful, that unless the tumbling is reviewed in slow motion, they present the illusion that the legs are completely straight.


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Old 11-19-2005, 11:08 AM   #3
Ross Hunt
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Thank you, Coach.
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Old 11-19-2005, 04:36 PM   #4
Roger Harrell
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I want to also add that on a wood floor tumbling technique will vary from what you would do on a spring floor. There will definately be more absorption in the legs, but it is still a dynamic "punching" vs a "jump".
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