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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 04-17-2011, 11:45 AM   #21
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Originally Posted by Sam Ser View Post
they still take thousands of steps each day. a few hundred more won't do much.
You'd be surprised, actually. 30 minutes of brisk walking will be about a mile and a half for most people. That's substantially more ground than a sedentary person will typically cover.

Katherine
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Old 04-17-2011, 12:08 PM   #22
Sam Ser
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
Completely agree with all of this. A nurse friend of mine pointed me to research showing that strength -- and particularly quadricep strength -- has a *huge* correlation with all kinds of quality of life issues in elderly people.

Unfortunately, that kind of training requires a lot more equipment and personal attention than walking around the neighborhood for half an hour, which means it's a lot more expensive and Medicare won't cover it. :-(

Katherine
the study i'm thinking of, as i recall it, did involve leg press and leg extension machines, but such equipment is by no means necessary for developing strength in the quads. squats to a chair, low step-ups and the like are a fine starting point. a few dumbbells and some padded flooring round out the equipment.

as for guidance/training, it's pretty much a wash. if we're talking about movement restriced elderly folks, then they're likely to be in an assisted living facility anyway, not out jogging on the beach. so the manpower and sophistication are not an issue.

besides, medicare should be doing cartwheels over this. a functional training room costs almost nothing to outfit and to maintain. commercial grade treadmills, on the other hand, are quite expensive.
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Old 04-17-2011, 12:27 PM   #23
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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as for guidance/training, it's pretty much a wash. if we're talking about movement restriced elderly folks, then they're likely to be in an assisted living facility anyway, not out jogging on the beach. so the manpower and sophistication are not an issue.

besides, medicare should be doing cartwheels over this. a functional training room costs almost nothing to outfit and to maintain. commercial grade treadmills, on the other hand, are quite expensive.
Wrong on both counts, alas. First, there are plenty of people who are muddling along fine on their own, but have no margin for error. They sprain their wrist, say, and suddenly they can't get out of a chair because they can't use that hand to help. Improved strength *should* be how you keep people out of nursing homes, not something that only gets attention once they're too far gone to take care of themselves, but that's not the way the system works.

Furthermore, Medicare won't pay for preventative care, only for rehabilitation and therapy once an injury has already occurred. And it certainly won't pay for gym memberships or other means for unsupervised exercise. Even in an assisted living setting, it only pays for skilled nursing care, not "activities of daily living" like washing and dressing, and not physical therapy unless medically necessary.

Yet someone who is so mobility-limited that squats and getting up off the floor are issues simply won't embark on this kind of training without help. Nor should they, as it isn't safe. But help costs money, and walking is free.

(Yes, I unfortunately have very recent experience with this, on behalf of an elderly family member. Smoke is still coming out of my ears.)

Katherine

Last edited by Katherine Derbyshire : 04-17-2011 at 12:29 PM.
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Old 04-17-2011, 01:10 PM   #24
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Power walking is an effective form of steady state aerobic exercise. It is also very effective, when combined with diet, for weight loss in some individuals. I would challenge you to find a very hilly course and walk it as hard as you can for half an hour. It can be humbling.
Humbling? Power walking in hilly terrain doesn't even warm me up and I'm 52 years old. My VO2 max is about 57 and my resting heart rate is 40. It didn't get there from walking. Most of my 5km rowing workouts are done at a pace greater than 1,000 calories/hour. Walking is a rest day in comparison. For someone younger and fitter power walking becomes an even more ludicrous exercise prescription.

However, a slow walk from one end of a shopping mall to the other is a big deal for my 88-year old mother. Squats? That's a lot of hip and back pain for her. For her walking is a good option.

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Old 04-17-2011, 01:59 PM   #25
Ryan Dell Whitley
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Humbling? Power walking in hilly terrain doesn't even warm me up and I'm 52 years old..
Then you're not walking fast enough.
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Old 04-17-2011, 02:14 PM   #26
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

Any faster and they call it "running".
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Old 04-17-2011, 02:22 PM   #27
Donald Lee
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
Humbling? Power walking in hilly terrain doesn't even warm me up and I'm 52 years old. My VO2 max is about 57 and my resting heart rate is 40. It didn't get there from walking. Most of my 5km rowing workouts are done at a pace greater than 1,000 calories/hour. Walking is a rest day in comparison. For someone younger and fitter power walking becomes an even more ludicrous exercise prescription.

However, a slow walk from one end of a shopping mall to the other is a big deal for my 88-year old mother. Squats? That's a lot of hip and back pain for her. For her walking is a good option.
I didn't think walking was a big deal either, until I tried joining the military.

I usu. use walking on a treadmill for cardio when I want to lose weight. I can get my HR to stay at about 120-130 if I'm walking at 3.7 mph at a slight incline to mimic being outside. And I have a RHR of about 42 lying down.
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Old 04-17-2011, 04:09 PM   #28
Jamie Gowens
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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then you start with squats to a chair and push-ups from the knees.

most movements are scalable.
You obviously greatly overestimate the activity level of the average American.
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Old 04-17-2011, 05:45 PM   #29
Robert D Taylor Jr
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Any faster and they call it "running".
Then your ruck is too light.
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Old 04-17-2011, 05:48 PM   #30
Shane Skowron
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
Humbling? Power walking in hilly terrain doesn't even warm me up and I'm 52 years old. My VO2 max is about 57 and my resting heart rate is 40. It didn't get there from walking. Most of my 5km rowing workouts are done at a pace greater than 1,000 calories/hour. Walking is a rest day in comparison. For someone younger and fitter power walking becomes an even more ludicrous exercise prescription.

However, a slow walk from one end of a shopping mall to the other is a big deal for my 88-year old mother. Squats? That's a lot of hip and back pain for her. For her walking is a good option.

With regard to walking, there is a huge difference between brisk walking and power walking/race walking.

Brisk walking is what I do when I get to work, get my groceries, go shopping, and so forth.

I've recently added some power walking into my regimen to help me in my ultramarathons (which has worked, apparently). After a set of heavy squats I put up the incline to 15% and walk at 3-3.5mph for anywhere from 20-60 minutes. It is really tough, and being only 5'8" does not help.

I agree with Ryan that if you don't think walking is hard, you need to go faster -- much faster -- and you'll see that it's a very effective cardiovascular workout.

Rowing is great, too, but less practical for many people.



Race walking is no joke. The best racewalkers can walk 50k faster than most people can run a marathon (42k).





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Originally Posted by Mauricio Leal View Post
This also reminds me of something I saw on an affiliate's FB page recently, which apparently was originally posted by Glenn Pendlay (although he might've borrowed it from elsewhere too).

If you're looking for a reductionist philosophy on the low end spectrum of fitness and nutrition, it's practically that simple.
Awesome, and probably true.
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