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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 01-09-2011, 02:57 PM   #11
Bob D Pratt
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

IMO heart rate is not a great indicator of overall health.

I have a very low heart rate mostly due to endurance work.
Genetics also plays a part.
Are you taking your pulse first thing in the morning; before getting out of bed? Are you taking it for 15, 30 or 60 sec's?

Heart rate as a sign of overtraining is really only applicable if you have a good base measure and consistent variables.

Consult a doctor for more info. IMO heart rate is not a great indicator of overall health.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:00 PM   #12
Bob D Pratt
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

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Originally Posted by Bob D Pratt View Post
consistent variables.


That may sound like a oxymoron but I mean are you taking it the same time, place, amount of sleep etc......

My HR will be up @ 10BPM if I don't get a good nights sleep.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:16 PM   #13
Ian Strand
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

As Bob mentioned, RHR is often heavily influenced by genetics. Low rates usually run in the family. I wouldn't use it as an indicator of health.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:37 PM   #14
Shane Skowron
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

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Originally Posted by Kevin Simons View Post
I have been checking my resting heart rate the last few mornings out of curiosity. I was really surprised that it usually comes in around 72-75 bpm. On some of the sites I have checked, this puts me in the "below average" category for my age. This seems weird to me because I consider myself remarkably healthy. You can see some of the numbers in my signature, and I also have a 3:13 1k row and 35 rounds of Cindy. Body fat is a bit high right now, but not much different than my avatar. How good of a health indicator is resting heart rate, and what are some of your numbers?
You might want to try checking it first thing in the morning, lying down, and take some really deep slow breaths beforehand. Don't hold your breath but try to get to a point where you don't need to take much breath.

I have decent cardiovascular endurance but my RHR is usually between 59-65. Whatever.

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Originally Posted by Eric R Cohen View Post
I have heard a high resting heart rate is often a sign of over training...
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Originally Posted by Eric Montgomery View Post
Check it at various times during the day. If it's still that high, it sounds like a good sign of overtraining or at least something that should be checked out. I'm not in near as good a shape as your numbers indicate, and my RHR is usually in the 40s.

The high RHR thing and overtraining is only if it is higher than normal. For example if you're heart rate is always 72, it doesn't mean you're overtrained. But if your heart rate is always 45 and then one morning it jumps up to 75 without doing any activity, then you're overtrained. The idea is that the body is working harder to do the same activity, which means you're not making gains but rather regressing.

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Originally Posted by Marcel Zwinger View Post
personal experience: I have a higher heart rate, when I consume too much caffein.
also, when I drink too much
and normally it has something to do with potasium deficiency ...
Well, caffeine is a stimulant, so of course your heart rate will increase. Other stimulants like cocaine and amphetamines will do that too.


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Originally Posted by Sean Rooks View Post
Isn't a high resting heart rate considered a sign of overtraining for endurance athletes while vertical or broad jump is considered a better indicator of overtraining for strength athletes?
Sounds about right. Grip strength via dynamometer is probably a better one since it wouldn't be affected by leg fatigue/soreness, although it's hard to get that equipment.
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:07 PM   #15
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

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Isn't a high resting heart rate considered a sign of overtraining for endurance athletes while vertical or broad jump is considered a better indicator of overtraining for strength athletes?
"High" relative to what?

On the one hand, a strength athlete will probably have a higher resting heart rate than an endurance athlete in the first place. So a heart rate that would be high for a marathoner may be completely normal for a powerlifter.

On the other hand, if the strength athlete's heart rate jumps 50% from his baseline, that still seems to indicate some kind of problem to me.

Katherine
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:03 PM   #16
Donald Lee
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

Consistently elevated RHR can indicate sympathetic overtraining, while consistently depressed RHR can indicate parasympathetic overtraining.

Sympathetic overtraining always precedes parasympathetic overtraining...I think.
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Old 01-09-2011, 07:12 PM   #17
Quinn Walkley
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

First of all a HR between 60-100 is considered normal. Some people, whether they are endurance athletes or not have higher HR. Working in a hospital I you see sick people with low HR's as well. It is all relative to the person.
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Old 01-09-2011, 08:46 PM   #18
Chris Mason
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

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Healthy and fit are not the same. Looking at your numbers it is easy to see you are fast and pretty strong, but that HR is high. Good endurance athletes will have resting HR is the low to mid 50's. Mine is 65 ,ost mornings, and if I see 70 I will pull back the training intensity for the day. High HR is big sign of under-resting or lack of quality sleep.
Or the fact he carries a lot more muscle than the average Joe, and relative to his baseline physique. One reasons endurance athletes have such low heart rates is because they have so little muscle mass.
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Old 01-10-2011, 01:55 AM   #19
Doug Lantz
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

Check out "Sisu" to hear Mikko Salo's examining doctor's opinion of Mikko's resting heart rate, it's hilarious.

http://journal.crossfit.com/search.p...h=SISU&x=0&y=0 (WFS)
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Old 01-10-2011, 10:45 AM   #20
Jordan Derksen
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Re: Resting Heart Rate as an Indicator of Health

Hey, I agree with Pratt.

And really, don't compare yourself to endurance athletes because depending on they're endurance sport of choice I would say they aren't fit. I have the same deal as you, I'm 6'2, 180lbs, not as strong as you but still pretty fit and my RHR is usually 60-70 depending on time of day. I never really dip below 60. I asked my physiology prof at uni about it and he just said it comes down to genetics and training style. Mostly genetics.

And Katherines right as well. I mean, we actually have muscle mass. It makes a difference because it all takes upkeep.
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