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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 05-12-2007, 09:06 PM   #1
Lucas Salvatore
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Hello,

I'm new to CF and I came across this forum while searching for some solutions or the cause of sore joints and wrists after hitting a heavy bag. I saw a post and was reading replies and everyone was very helpful and courteous to the poster. That being said, I still have a problem of my own :-)

I'm Male, 17 and I am around 5'10" or 5'11". I weigh about 225lbs. I usually can't stick to diets too well and I thought of just working out regularily. (I read somewhere that most teens can keep a respectable weight off of excercising alone and not necessarily having a diet (for weight loss))

Anyways, So I bought myself a 70LB heavy bag and I had a 25LB double end bag from before. I bought some heavy bag gloves and gelwrap gloves from everlast and started hitting the bag and exercising with that, lifting some weights, skipping rope and squats.

My problem is that always after 10 minutes or so of hitting the bag, I get pains in the palms of my hands and my wrists hurt. There is considerable pain if I were to move my hand in a 'waving' motion as if waving hello quickly. I'm assuming it's from hitting the bag awkwardly and not having proper technique. Is there any tips you could give a guy like me to avoid these injuries?

And more importantly, do i really need to try to 'kill' the bag? or can I can just moderately hit it and move around? (keep in mind this is for cardio and weight loss)

Any information you can give me is appreciated,

Cheers, Lucas
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Old 05-13-2007, 06:59 AM   #2
Elliot Royce
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Welcome. This was recently covered in another post from Peter Queen. Get full wrist wraps and use them. It's as simple as that, plus make sure when you punch that your wrist is straight, not cocked.

The best workout and training is going to come from learning to be smooth and rapid. Bas Rutten (search on internet) sells a boxing training CD with combinations you can work on (it's hard). If you work combinations, then you will be punching hard but also punching with a purpose.
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Old 05-13-2007, 07:33 AM   #3
Lucas Salvatore
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Thank you for the post. Actually, the post that I saw that brought me to this forum was that exact topic by Peter Queen, sorry for bringing up an old issue.

One other thing i'm curious about is how are you supposed to hit the bag at a spot higher than your own height? Won't this result in hitting the bag with a cocked fist?

Thanks
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Old 05-13-2007, 12:13 PM   #4
Artem Sivak
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If you're using heavy bag gloves, hitting a bag above your own height shouldn't be a problem. The surface area of the impact is large enough not to cause any trouble to the wrist.

Some help for your wrist pains.

Do stretches for your wrists. Hold each for 15-20 secs for a 3-4 sets.

Knuckle push-ups also help with wrist development.

Hope this helps.
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Old 05-14-2007, 08:22 AM   #5
Elliot Royce
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when I say cocked, I mean the wrist departing from what I would call the lateral plane (up or down). When you punch up, you're going to keep your wrist aligned with your arm, you'll just hit with the glove at an angle. Does that make sense? The basic principle is that your wrist is transfering the full force of your body through to the hand and you want it braced in its strongest position. Same idea as locking out your arms when you do a snatch or jerk.
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Old 05-14-2007, 08:32 PM   #6
Keegan Yentsch
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Hi Lucas,

I'd actually suggest that you not get wrist wraps (or at least don't put them on until you start to get tired). Wrist wraps are great for protecting your wrist, but like a weight belt, if you always wear them you will not develop the strength in your wrists to be able to punch hard without them.

The most important thing that you can learn to do is to learn how to align your wrist correctly while punching. This and actually performing resistance training exercises for the muscles of your wrists/forearms will go a long way to eliminating wrist soreness from punching.

Good training,

Keegan
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Old 05-14-2007, 11:06 PM   #7
Adam Stanecki
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I'd highly recommend finding someone to teach you to punch correctly. More people than not punch incorrectly and this is the cause of a lot of unnecessary pain and injury.
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Old 05-15-2007, 11:04 AM   #8
Elliot Royce
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Getting a trainer is good advice. However, my trainer started with wrist wraps. I disagree with Keegan in that I don't think the wrist can ever be strong enough to deal with a really heavy punch that happens to land slightly off (the bag is swinging or your opponent is moving). Say you weigh 220lbs. If you're punching correctly, you're probably going to transmit more than 150lbs multiplied by the speed of your body and arm through the weak link of your wrist. I'm not a physicist but I would guess that 300lbs or more of pressure could be at stake. I think it's an injury waiting to happen.

I suppose if you're training for street fighting then it makes sense. I read a book about a hockey goon who punched cement blocks until his knuckles (and wrists) could take any amount of punishment.
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Old 05-15-2007, 11:21 AM   #9
Matthew Nielsen
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lol, get yourself a pair of good wraps and gloves...
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Old 05-15-2007, 04:22 PM   #10
Lucas Salvatore
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Thank you all very much for the comments,

Artem, thanks for stretching tip & suggestion with knuckle pushups, past few days I've been working that into my training

Elliot, I understand what you mean now, yes. I thought that hitting the back at an angle was bad for the wrist so I tended to not align my wrist with the rest of my arm, I think this is what has caused the majority of the wrist pain. That and inexperience :-)

Keegan, thank you also for the tip, I've changed now from trying to really hit hard, to performing consistant punches, this already has helped.

I was asking around as well and I'm going to get a trainer so I can learn to punch properly.

Thank you all for comments :-)
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